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How can I use two devices in order to improve for example the performance of the following code (sum of vectors)? Is it possible to use more devices "at the same time"? If yes, how can I manage the allocations of the vectors on the global memory of the different devices?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <cuda.h>

#define NB 32
#define NT 500
#define N NB*NT

__global__ void add( double *a, double *b, double *c);

//===========================================
__global__ void add( double *a, double *b, double *c){

    int tid = threadIdx.x + blockIdx.x * blockDim.x; 

    while(tid < N){
        c[tid] = a[tid] + b[tid];
        tid += blockDim.x * gridDim.x;
    }

}

//============================================
//BEGIN
//===========================================
int main( void ) {

    double *a, *b, *c;
    double *dev_a, *dev_b, *dev_c;

    // allocate the memory on the CPU
    a=(double *)malloc(N*sizeof(double));
    b=(double *)malloc(N*sizeof(double));
    c=(double *)malloc(N*sizeof(double));

    // allocate the memory on the GPU
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_a, N * sizeof(double) );
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_b, N * sizeof(double) );
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_c, N * sizeof(double) );

    // fill the arrays 'a' and 'b' on the CPU
    for (int i=0; i<N; i++) {
        a[i] = (double)i;
        b[i] = (double)i*2;
    }

    // copy the arrays 'a' and 'b' to the GPU
    cudaMemcpy( dev_a, a, N * sizeof(double), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    cudaMemcpy( dev_b, b, N * sizeof(double), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);

    for(int i=0;i<10000;++i)
        add<<<NB,NT>>>( dev_a, dev_b, dev_c );

    // copy the array 'c' back from the GPU to the CPU
    cudaMemcpy( c, dev_c, N * sizeof(double), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);

    // display the results
    // for (int i=0; i<N; i++) {
    //      printf( "%g + %g = %g\n", a[i], b[i], c[i] );
    //  }
    printf("\nGPU done\n");

    // free the memory allocated on the GPU
    cudaFree( dev_a );
    cudaFree( dev_b );
    cudaFree( dev_c );
    // free the memory allocated on the CPU
    free( a );
    free( b );
    free( c );

    return 0;
}

Thank you in advance. Michele

share|improve this question
    
Using your GPU is useless unless you use threads with it. A thread per core of GPU will higly improve your code execution. –  Depado May 10 '12 at 8:18
    
@Depado: I can only assume that you don't understand that code based on your comment, because it runs 16000 threads in total in a perfectly valid way (although the block size should be a multiple of 32). –  talonmies May 10 '12 at 8:55
    
@talonmies Well I have to admit I have a very limited knowledge about Cuda and I didn't see that there were already trheads in it, sorry for useless comment :) –  Depado May 10 '12 at 9:00
4  
@Depado: So if you didn't understand what you were talking about, why comment at all? How does that help the person who asked the question? –  talonmies May 10 '12 at 9:44
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1 Answer

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Since CUDA 4.0 was released, multi-GPU computations of the type you are asking about are relatively easy. Prior to that, you would have need to use a multi-threaded host application with one host thread per GPU and some sort of inter-thread communication system in order to use mutliple GPUs inside the same host application.

Now it is possible to do something like this for the memory allocation part of your host code:

double *dev_a[2], *dev_b[2], *dev_c[2];
const int Ns[2] = {N/2, N-(N/2)};

// allocate the memory on the GPUs
for(int dev=0; dev<2; dev++) {
    cudaSetDevice(dev);
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_a[dev], Ns[dev] * sizeof(double) );
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_b[dev], Ns[dev] * sizeof(double) );
    cudaMalloc( (void**)&dev_c[dev], Ns[dev] * sizeof(double) );
}

(disclaimer: written in browser, never compiled, never tested, use at own risk).

The basic idea here is that you use cudaSetDevice to select between devices when you are preforming operations on a device. So in the above snippet, I have assumed two GPUs and allocated memory on each [(N/2) doubles on the first device and N-(N/2) on the second].

The transfer of data from the host to device could be as simple as:

// copy the arrays 'a' and 'b' to the GPUs
for(int dev=0,pos=0; dev<2; pos+=Ns[dev], dev++) {
    cudaSetDevice(dev);
    cudaMemcpy( dev_a[dev], a+pos, Ns[dev] * sizeof(double), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    cudaMemcpy( dev_b[dev], b+pos, Ns[dev] * sizeof(double), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
}

(disclaimer: written in browser, never compiled, never tested, use at own risk).

The kernel launching section of your code could then look something like:

for(int i=0;i<10000;++i) {
    for(int dev=0; dev<2; dev++) {
        cudaSetDevice(dev);
        add<<<NB,NT>>>( dev_a[dev], dev_b[dev], dev_c[dev], Ns[dev] );
    }
}

(disclaimer: written in browser, never compiled, never tested, use at own risk).

Note that I have added an extra argument to your kernel call, because each instance of the kernel may be called with a different number of array elements to process. I Will leave it to you to work out the modifications required. But, again, the basic idea is the same: use cudaSetDevice to select a given GPU, then run kernels on it in the normal way, with each kernel getting its own unique arguments.

You should be able to put these parts together to produce a simple multi-GPU application. There are a lot of other features which can be used in recent CUDA versions and hardware to assist multiple GPU applications (like unified addressing, the peer-to-peer facilities are more), but this should be enough to get you started. There is also a simple muLti-GPU application in the CUDA SDK you can look at for more ideas.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very very much talonmies!! Your suggestions will get me start well... sorry for my bad english –  micheletuttafesta May 10 '12 at 10:05
2  
Nothing to apologise for, I understood the question and the English it was written in perfectly. –  talonmies May 10 '12 at 12:29
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