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I wanted to ask how to parse a String and add a Line break (\n) every 100 characters. I know that you can parse The String with Regex, but don't know how to proceed later on. Can somebody help?

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2  
Post us the code that you have, and we'll help you from there. –  Jon May 10 '12 at 8:26

8 Answers 8

up vote 27 down vote accepted

You could do something like so:

String str = "....";
String parsedStr = str.replaceAll("(.{100})", "$1\n");

This will replace every 100 characters with the same 100 characters and add a new line at the end.

The (.{100}) will capture a group of 100 characters. The $1 in the second will put the content of the group. The \n will be then appended to the 100 characters which have been just matched.

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Weird, never thought about it before... smart indeed. –  Buhake Sindi May 10 '12 at 8:32
3  
Very smart solution. +1 I like it. –  T.Grottker May 10 '12 at 8:32
    
Nice solution. I should really take some time to understand regex... +1 –  Wouter Konecny May 10 '12 at 8:39
    
@TheEliteGentleman: I only figured it out a few months ago, I think I've seen it for the first time on SO. –  npinti May 10 '12 at 8:41
    
@T.Grottker: I appreciate your comment. –  npinti May 10 '12 at 8:42

Quite simply:

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); i++) {
    if (i > 0 && (i % 100 == 0)) {
        sb.append("\n");
    }

    sb.append(str.charAt(i));
}

str = sb.toString();
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Nice one. I did a slightly different approach that doesn't iterate through each index. –  Kaushik Shankar May 10 '12 at 8:39

Could try this perhaps?

String stringToParse = "abcde";

for(int i = 0; i < stringToParse.size(); i = i + 100){
   stringToParse = ((StringBuffer) stringToParse ).insert(i, "\n").toString();
}
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string[i]? it's an array? –  keyser May 10 '12 at 8:27
3  
That's absolutely wrong, you're just replacing the character with a \n at index i. Besides, Java String can't be indexed. –  Buhake Sindi May 10 '12 at 8:27
    
OP is not trying to modify the original data. This does not work. –  Kaushik Shankar May 10 '12 at 8:28
    
I should probably clean the sleep out of my eyes before typing! Editing the answer now. –  David K May 10 '12 at 8:30
    
Can you implicitly convert from String to StringBuffer? –  Kaushik Shankar May 10 '12 at 8:38

I suggest using StringBuilder. It is efficient and can suit your task exactly.

String originalString = ... ;

// The new length of the string is
int newLength = originalString.length() +(int) Math.ceil ( originalString.length() / 100.0 );

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder ( newLength );

I'll refer to each 100 character part of the string as a "chunk" so that its easy to see what's going on.

int chunkStart = 0;

while ( chunkStart < originalString.length() )
{
    // We find the index of the end of the chunk.
    int endOfThisChunk = Math.min ( chunkStart + 100, originalString.length() );

    // and this chunk to builder
    builder.append ( originalString.substring( chunkStart, endOfThisChunk ) );

    // append the new line character
    builder.append ( '\n' );

    // set the next spot for chunkStart
    chunkStart = endOfThisChunk;
}

return builder.toString();

Hope that helps! If you need more explanation please let me know!

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i think this is a bit faster than % 100 and repeatedly appending

function(String input) {
    // array represantation of the String
    final char[] inputArray = input.toCharArray();
    // same length + amount of newlines (i.e. length / 100)
    final char[] outputArray = new char[inputArray.length + (inputArray.length/100)];
    int i = 0;
    int o = 0;
    while(i < inputArray.length) {
        // copy every 100th substring
        System.arraycopy(inputArray,i,outputArray,o,100);
        i += 100;
        o += 101;
        outputArray[o] = '\n';
    }
    // copy rest
    if(i < inputArray.length) {
        System.arraycopy(inputArray,i,outputArray,o,inputArray.length-i);
    }
    return(outputArray.toString());
}

though untested

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Then your assumption that it's a bit faster than % 100 is unfounded and wrong if it hasn't been tested and compared with other solutions here or you may know of. –  Buhake Sindi May 10 '12 at 11:17
    
well I said I think not it is so. Since op wanted a regex solution and my answer ist just another alternative, I didn't see any need for testing. I just wanted to hint, not to offense –  Hachi May 11 '12 at 18:04

No need for a regex since you're not trying to match any patterns. Simply iterate over the string or use one of the code samples posted here.

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As you cannot just add more charachters to a regular String in Java. You should use the StringBuffer to do this.

You can loop through the String with a for loop and then so something after every 100th character:

String string = "Some long string ...";
StringBuffer buffer = new StringBuffer();

for(int i = 0; i < string.length(); i++) {
    // Append a \n after every 100th character.
    if((i > 0) && (i % 100) == 0) {
        buffer.append("\n");
    }
    // Just adds the next character to the StringBuffer.
    buffer.append(string.charAt(i));
}

String parsedString = buffer.toString();
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It will add a \n at i = 0. See my post. –  Buhake Sindi May 10 '12 at 8:33
    
Stupid me, thanks for your comment. –  Wouter Konecny May 10 '12 at 8:37
1  
Why iterate through each i and add a character at a time? Wouldn't it be easier to add one full chunk at a time? (See my post) –  Kaushik Shankar May 14 '12 at 19:37
    
Didn't thought of that that quickly. Nice one. –  Wouter Konecny May 14 '12 at 21:12

There is no need to parse the String via regex, you can just split it.

String s = "your very long String";
String[] splited = new String[s.size() / 100 + 1];
for (int i = 0; i < splited.length(); i++) {
  splited[i] = s.subString(0, 100);
  s = s.subString(100);
}

EDIT

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
for(int i = 0; i< splited.size(); i++) {
  sb.append(splited[i]);
  sb.append("\n");
}
String stringWithNewLines = sb.toString();
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Split and then what? How do you add new lines and join it later? –  Buhake Sindi May 10 '12 at 8:31
    
Did you test your code? I can still see that (the updated code) you have never put a \n nor does it do what the OP asks. –  Buhake Sindi May 10 '12 at 8:34
    
I saved the substrings in an array. It is nearly trival to recombine it and add a newline, but I edit my answer. –  T.Grottker May 10 '12 at 8:51

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