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I have a rather specific question about how to exclude items of one list from another. Common approaches such as Except() won't do and here is why:

  • If the duplicate within a list has an "even" index - I need to remove THIS element and the NEXT element AFTER it.
  • if the duplicate within a list had an "odd" index - I need to remove THIS element AND one element BEFORE** it.
  • there might be many appearances of the same duplicate within a list. i.e. one might be with an "odd" index, another - "even".

I'm not asking for a solution since I've created one myself. However after performing this method many times - "ANTS performance profiler" shows that the method elapses 75% of whole execution time (30 seconds out of 40). The question is: Is there a faster method to perform the same operation? I've tried to optimize my current code but it still lacks performance. Here it is:

private void removedoubles(List<int> exclude, List<int> listcopy)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < exclude.Count(); j++)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < listcopy.Count(); i++)
        {
            if (listcopy[i] == exclude[j])
            {
                if (i % 2 == 0) // even
                {
                    //listcopy.RemoveRange(i, i + 1);
                    listcopy.RemoveAt(i);
                    listcopy.RemoveAt(i);
                    i = i - 1;
                }
                else //odd
                {
                    //listcopy.RemoveRange(i - 1, i);
                    listcopy.RemoveAt(i - 1);
                    listcopy.RemoveAt(i - 1);
                    i = i - 2;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

where:

  • exclude - list that contains Duplicates only. This list might contain up to 30 elements.
  • listcopy - list that should be checked for duplicates. If duplicate from "exclude" is found -> perform removing operation. This list might contain up to 2000 elements.

I think that the LINQ might be some help but I don't understand its syntax well.

share|improve this question
2  
Bold and upper case, too much screaming in my opinion. – Uwe Keim May 10 '12 at 8:54
    
it's to show the main idea. anyway, edited the issue – Alex May 10 '12 at 8:56
3  
AHHH - never ever change the loop variable within a for loop! Use a while loop instead! – Thorsten Dittmar May 10 '12 at 8:56
2  
You're calling the Count() method, which is part of LINQ. This may be slower than simply using the Count property which is alread built into the List class. – Thorsten Dittmar May 10 '12 at 9:01
up vote 5 down vote accepted

A faster way (O(n)) would be to do the following:

  1. go through the exclude list and make it into a HashSet (O(n))
  2. in the checks, check if the element being tested is in the set (again O(n)), since test for presence in a HashSet is O(1).

Maybe you can even change your algorithms so that the exclude collection will be a HashSet from the very beginning, this way you can omit step 1 and gain even more speed.

(Your current way is O(n^2).)


Edit:
Another idea is the following: you are perhaps creating a copy of some list and make this method modify it? (Guess based on the parameter name.) Then, you can change it to the following: you pass the original array to the method, and make the method allocate new array and return it (your method signature should be than something like private List<int> getWithoutDoubles(HashSet<int> exclude, List<int> original)).


Edit:
It could be even faster if you would reorganize the input data in the following way: As the items are always removed in pairs (even index + the following odd index), you should pair them in advance! So that your list if ints becomes list of pairs of ints. This way your method might be be something like that:

private List<Tuple<int, int>> getWithoutDoubles(
              HashSet<int> exclude, List<Tuple<int, int>> original)
{
    return original.Where(xy => (!exclude.Contains(xy.Item1) &&
                                 !exclude.Contains(xy.Item2)))
           .ToList();
}

(you remove the pairs where either the first or the second item is in the exclude collection). Instead of Tuple, perhaps you can pack the items into your custom type.

share|improve this answer
    
This is great, too, as it only requires one loop and removes doubles from the "to be deleted" list automatically. – Thorsten Dittmar May 10 '12 at 9:03

Here is yet another way to get the results.

var a = new List<int> {1, 2, 3, 4, 5};

var b = new List<int> {1, 2, 3};

var c = (from i in a let found = b.Any(j => j == i) where !found select i).ToList();

c will contain 4,5

share|improve this answer

Can you convert the List to LinkedList and have a try? The List.RemoveAt() is more expensive than LinkedList.Remove().

share|improve this answer

Reverse your loops so they start at .Count - 1 and go to 0, so you don't have to change i in one of the cases and Count is only evaluated once per collection.

share|improve this answer
    
brilliant ideas! *went coding – Alex May 10 '12 at 8:59
2  
He's not calling Count, he's calling Count(). The first is just a property of the List class, the other is LINQ - I guess, changing the code to use the property instead of the method would be a great improvement in the first place. – Thorsten Dittmar May 10 '12 at 9:00
1  
@Alex: Mind that if you are counting backwards, you'll need to change your index calculations for the items to remove. – Vlad May 10 '12 at 9:03

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