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I was wondering if it is 100% correct to write variable names inside quotation marks.

I mean, is there any reason to do

echo "Hello my name is " . $name;

instead of

echo "Hello my name is $name";

Thanks.

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1  
I personally use the first way with single quotes - most because of my IDE then showing text and variables in different colors. –  djot May 10 '12 at 9:10
1  
Sounds like a question out of boredom. –  itachi May 10 '12 at 9:14
    
itachi: I'm beyond that stage of boredom. Instead, I answer questions like these :) –  psynnott May 10 '12 at 9:16
1  
echo "Hello my name is " . $name; , this way is kinda easy to read for me –  neok May 10 '12 at 9:20
    
Yes it is 100% correct PHP syntax to write that way. PHP won't give you a syntax error. But you would have known that by executing your code and if uncertain, looking up the language in the manual. So -1. –  hakre May 10 '12 at 10:31
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closed as not a real question by Loz Cherone, Soner Gönül, hakre, random, Matt May 16 '12 at 12:35

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Actually, as I already commented, it is 100% correct PHP syntax to write that way. PHP won't give you a syntax error. But you would have known that by executing your code and if uncertain, looking up the language in the manual.

So the short answer is: Yes, 100% correct.

Then you asked "is there any reason to do" - and I'd like to highly suggest that you define the reason, because objectively, there ain't one. The "metrics" given in the accepted answer are misleading, because the problem has (and actually technically never can be strictly) not been isolated enough (even it could be) which leads to comparing wrong numbers.

If the difference between the two would be calculated, there literally is no difference that can be metriced - zero, nada, nothing.

Additionally, it even varies, sometimes even the one is faster, sometimes the other (if you run it, for code/demo see below):

10 runs à 100 000 iterations:

  single |  double  |   diff    |   real   
---------+----------+-----------+----------
0.014578 | 0.016206 | -0.001628 | -0.000000
0.015382 | 0.016352 | -0.000970 | -0.000000
0.015050 | 0.016156 | -0.001106 | -0.000000
0.015630 | 0.016280 | -0.000650 | -0.000000
0.015259 | 0.016220 | -0.000961 | -0.000000
0.015189 | 0.016190 | -0.001001 | -0.000000
0.014612 | 0.016264 | -0.001652 | -0.000000
0.015672 | 0.016257 | -0.000585 | -0.000000
0.015171 | 0.016251 | -0.001080 | -0.000000
0.014855 | 0.016166 | -0.001311 | -0.000000

Your "code" will get more improvement if you upgrade your PHP version constantly than wondering about which one is faster.

Rule of Thumb: Unless you don't run into a bottleneck, don't, never-ever "optimize" out of the blue. You will make your code more bad than good.

You give the reason why to write this or that way, because you need to read your code.

enter image description here

http://codepad.viper-7.com/z5p2xf

<?php
/**
 * @link http://stackoverflow.com/questions/10530798/variable-name-inside-quotation-marks
 */
header('Content-Type: text/plain');

$iterations = 100000;
$runs = 10;
printf("%d runs à %s iterations:\n\n", $runs, number_format($iterations, 0, '', ' '));

$plateaux = 0;
for ($r = 0; $r < $runs; $r++) {
    $time = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 1; $i < $iterations; $i++) {
        ;
    }
    $plateaux += microtime(true) - $time;
}
$plateaux = $plateaux / $runs;


$results = array();

for ($r = 0; $r < $runs; $r++) {
    $result = &$results[];
    $time = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 1; $i < $iterations; $i++) {
        "name$i";
    }
    $result[1] = microtime(true) - $time;


    $time = microtime(true);
    for ($i = 1; $i < $iterations; $i++) {
        "name" . $i;
    }
    $result[0] = microtime(true) - $time; #
    unset($result);
}

echo "  single |  double  |   diff    |   real   \n";
echo "---------+----------+-----------+----------\n";

foreach ($results as $result) {
    $delta1 = $result[0] - $plateaux;
    $delta2 = $result[1] - $plateaux;
    $diff = $delta1 - $delta2;
    printf("%f | %f | %f | %f\n", $delta1, $delta2, $diff, $diff / $iterations);
}
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Downvoted due to the silly picture. –  psynnott May 11 '12 at 8:39
    
@psynnott: Wait, I'll place that guy under a tire^^ –  hakre May 11 '12 at 8:40
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Both are fine and it's user preference which you find more readable - personally I prefer the first method of concatenating the variable.

However, bear in mind that:

echo "Hello my name is $name";

is not the same as

echo 'Hello my name is $name';

The second will output literally:

Hello my name is $name

Something to keep in mind.

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+1 for mentioning the single quote. One of the common mistakes new developers make. –  itachi May 10 '12 at 9:18
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The only difference is performance, inserting variable name into quotation uses more processor.
Demonstration:

<?php
$name='name';
$time = microtime(true);
for ($i=1; $i<100000; $i++){
    $name = "name".$i;
    echo "Hello my name is " . $name;
}
echo '<br>*** duration:'.(microtime(true)-$time).' milliseconds ***<br>';
$time = microtime(true);
for ($i=1; $i<100000; $i++){
    $name = "name$i";
    echo "Hello my name is $name";
}
echo '<br>*** duration:'.(microtime(true)-$time).' milliseconds ***<br>';
?>

Running this script on a Intel core I3-2120 3.3Ghz returns:
* duration:0.25428795814514 milliseconds
duration:2.8928861618042 milliseconds *

The difference is not big deal, but just to show the concept.

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Sure its 100000 loops but its still 10x difference, right? –  zaf May 10 '12 at 9:41
2  
FWIW on my MacPro with PHP 5.3.8 the interpolated version is (surprisingly) fastest, albeit only by ~ 20%. –  Alnitak May 10 '12 at 10:09
1  
Your answer is misleading therefore I've placed the warning. –  hakre May 10 '12 at 10:27
2  
@hakre: If an answer is misleading, downvote it and use comments to inform. Don't vandalize the answer directly. –  BoltClock May 11 '12 at 1:04
1  
Look at nikic's article Disproving the Single Quotes Performance Myth. There's the reason why it's unnecessary to optimize at that stage. –  Dan Lee May 11 '12 at 7:40
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it is purely a preference, both are 100% correct. i prefer first method of concatenation though for readability.

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