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I have SQL Server 2005 and a table with 2 columns of type datetime.

My query is:

select 
    DocDate, 
    CONVERT(nvarchar, DocDate, 126), 
    _stamp, 
    CONVERT(nvarchar, _stamp, 126) 
from 
    dochead 
where 
    id = 4493130

Result is:

DocDate                   (no column name)      _stamp                    (no column name)
2011-08-31 00:00:00.000   2011-08-31T00:00:00   2011-08-31 16:01:17.243   2011-08-31T16:01:17.243

As you can see second column has not milliseconds. Why?

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You should always define a length for your (n)varchar column! Otherwise, you might end up with a 1-character long string at some point.... so use CONVERT(VARCHAR(50), ...) or something like that - just a good habit to adopt –  marc_s May 10 '12 at 9:58
    
Why do you think it important that the milliseconds be included when they are 0? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever May 10 '12 at 10:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is no milliseconds part at all, you can add .000 manually:

select 
    DocDate, 
    left(CONVERT(nvarchar, DocDate, 126) + '.000', 23)
    _stamp, 
    left(CONVERT(nvarchar, _stamp, 126) + '.000', 23)
from 
    dochead 
where 
    id = 4493130

Live example: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!3/d41d8/955

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It's a valid ISO 8601 datetime representation, which is all that format 126 says that you get. Hate to quote Wikipedia, but:

  • For reduced accuracy,[5] any number of values may be dropped from any of the date and time representations, but in the order from the least to the most significant. For example, "2004-05" is a valid ISO 8601 date, which indicates May (the fifth month) 2004. This format will never represent the 5th day of an unspecified month in 2004, nor will it represent a time-span extending from 2004 into 2005.

  • If necessary for a particular application, the standard supports the addition of a decimal fraction to the smallest time value in the representation.

So the decimal fraction of a second (e.g. milliseconds) are an optional part of this format.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Damien. I've got. I've thought (accordig to sql books) that part (milliseconds) is mandatory. In a part of our system this date is parsed as ParseExact. That was the problem. –  IVerzin May 11 '12 at 11:43

try this

select 
DocDate, 
CONVERT(nvarchar, DocDate, 126), _stamp, 
CONVERT(nvarchar, _stamp, 126) 
from  dochead where 
id = 4493130
share|improve this answer

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