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I tried to data both in mongodb and mysql. A rows has field list_id, there can be very many rows with one list_id. It looks like deleting multiple documents in mongdb is much faster that deleting multiple rows in mysql. I use innodb engine in mysql. Mysql and mongdb are on the same server. For example,

DELETE FROM contacts WHERE list_id = 100

is much slower than

return self::remove(array('LISTID' => $listId), array('safe' => true));

I use safe mode for driver in php, so it should wait until it deletes all data.

Here is info about mongodb collection:

 "count" : 23456989,
        "size" : 4391452160,
        "avgObjSize" : 187.21295218239646,
        "storageSize" : 5727051776,
        "numExtents" : 32,
        "nindexes" : 2,
        "lastExtentSize" : 961069056,
        "paddingFactor" : 1.0099999999950207,
        "flags" : 1,
        "totalIndexSize" : 2983806672,
        "indexSizes" : {
                "_id_" : 787504144,
                "LISTID_1_EMAIL_1" : 2196302528
        },
        "ok" : 1
}

For example, if there 100K rows that meet condition, in mongodb it's about 30 times faster, in mysql it took about 99 seconds to delete all 100K rows that meet this condition.

Indexes are used in both mysql and mongodb.

EXPLAIN SELECT *
FROM `subscribers`
WHERE list_id =118

id  select_type     table   type    possible_keys   key     key_len     ref     rows    Extra
1   SIMPLE  subscribers     ref     FK_list_id  FK_list_id  4   const   1    

I don't make this operations online now, I put data in queue and do it background, deleting data by chunks.

But I wonder why the time of deleting differes so much, something like 20-30 times. Is deleting in mongodb is much faster because this operation is not atomic in mongodb?

This is what

SET PROFILING = 1;
DELETE FROM subscribers WHERE list_id = 118;
SHOW PROFILE FOR QUERY 1;

displays for deleting 100K rows:

starting    0.000052
checking permissions    0.000000
Opening tables  0.000000
System lock     0.000000
init    0.000000
updating    84.382015
end     0.000006
Waiting for query cache lock    0.000002
end     0.000006
query end   0.035284
closing tables  0.000021
freeing items   0.000040
logging slow query  0.000001
logging slow query  0.000002
cleaning up     0.000002
share|improve this question
    
Pointless question without numbers and details. It is obvious that removing stuff from a RDBMS can be more expensive since transactional integrity, dealing with foreign keys etc. is more expensive than in MongoDB. Especially MongoDB is fire-and-forget and you will not notice when the operation is not finished. –  Andreas Jung May 10 '12 at 10:43
    
In mongodb safe mode is used, so it should wait until deleting. –  Oleg May 10 '12 at 10:48
    
Since you didn't say what engine you're using (innodb, myisam or something else), it's difficult to say why exactly, but it's known that Mongo does less and delays fsync-ing, therefore gaining speed (and losing records every now and then). –  N.B. May 10 '12 at 10:54
    
I use innodb engine in mysql. –  Oleg May 10 '12 at 10:59
    
The question then expands to what are InnoDB's config values, what hardware are you running it at, is mongo on the same machine as mysql etc, but the bottom line is that mongo achieves its speed by delaying writes to disk. It also does way less I/O than mysql, plus it's not so CPU intensive. The scenarios are endless here, the best way to determine what's happening is to check how many IOs are being done when you delete from each of them and that will give you your answer. –  N.B. May 10 '12 at 11:03

2 Answers 2

You could verify if the bottleneck is the query. How long does this take?

SELECT FROM contacts WHERE list_id = 100

If it's fast then some usual approaches would be

  • Delete in chunks as long as rows_affected is > 0

    DELETE FROM contacts WHERE list_id = 100 LIMIT 1000

  • Drop indexes (except list_id), DELETE, recreate indexes. MySql has to rebuild indexes every time you delete.

  • Add a logical delete column. Respect that in your queries. Run a cron job that deletes old records from time to time.

    UPDATE contacts SET deleted = true WHERE list_id = 100

  • Try another storage engine (MyISAM)

share|improve this answer
    
I said that field is indexes, so SELECT FROM contacts WHERE list_id = 100 is fast. –  Oleg May 10 '12 at 11:09
    
In my question I wrote that I don't make this operations online now, I put data in queue and do it background, deleting data by chunks, script is run by cron. The question is why the time of deleting in mongodb and mysql differs so much. I can't use MyISAM as I need transactions, all indexes that are create are necessary to query data. –  Oleg May 10 '12 at 11:13
    
InnoDB needs to rebuild it's indexes everytime you insert/update/delete a row. For inserts MySQL supports the INSERT DELAYED ... command which solves this problem for bulk inserts. There is nothing like that for deletes. As InnoDB uses transactions and it could happen that the query fails for record 99,999 of 100,00 0 and InnoDB has to rollback the complete transaction, that is a big task (let's say contacts has a FK-Relation to contact_numbers with on delete cascade it is even more to rollback. So try, deleting something between 1000 to 10,000 rows at a time, that should improve the speed –  SchlaWiener May 10 '12 at 12:19
    
Mongodb has to update collection indexes as well, right? –  Oleg May 10 '12 at 13:15
    
I don't know mongodb in detail. But I suppose safe = true does only mean, the call waits until the job is done. What happens, if the operation fails for record 70,000 of 100,000? Is the complete operation rolled back for every record that has been deleted? I suppose no. –  SchlaWiener May 14 '12 at 12:51

Pointless question without numbers and details. It is obvious that removing stuff from a RDBMS can be more expensive since transactional integrity, dealing with foreign keys etc. is more expensive than in MongoDB. Especially MongoDB is fire-and-forget and you will not notice when the operation is not finished

share|improve this answer
    
In mongodb safe mode is used, so it should wait until deleting. –  Oleg May 10 '12 at 10:49
    
What numbers and details do you want? –  Oleg May 10 '12 at 10:57
    
I have 2 cars. Car A is 30 times faster than car B. What numbers would you want? –  N.B. May 10 '12 at 11:03
    
In my question I wrote that in mysql it took about 99 seconds to delete 100K rows. –  Oleg May 10 '12 at 11:06

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