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Kinda of a noobie in PHP and Regex, I receive the following from a web service:

test:002005@1111@333333@;10205@2000@666666@;002005@1111@55555@;

The above line is a sequence of 3 numbers which repeats 3 times. I would like to get the 3rd number of each sequence and I believe the best course (besides 3000 explodes) would be preg_match_all but I am having a tough time wrapping my mind around RegEx.

The end result should look like this:

 Array
    (
        [0] => 333333
        [1] => 666666
        [2] => 55555
    )

Thanks in advance for any help.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
if(preg_match_all('/.*?(?:\d+@){2}(\d+)@;/',$s,$m)) {
        print_r($m[1]);
}

http://ideone.com/99M9t

or

You can do it using explode as:

$input = rtrim($input,';');
$temp1 = explode(';',$input);
foreach($temp1 as $val1) {
        $temp2 = explode('@',$val1);
        $result[] = $temp2[2];
}
print_r($result);

http://ideone.com/VH29g

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, that did the trick. I like this one due to defining the fact that there 2 "@XXXX" before the one that's needed. Great job! –  Alex May 10 '12 at 11:28

Use the function explode()

<?php

$pizza  = "piece1@piece2@piece3@piece4@piece5@piece6";
$pieces = explode("@", $pizza);
echo $pieces[0]; // piece1
echo $pieces[1]; // piece2

?>
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He asked for a version without explode, I assume his input is very large and he wants a fast/scalable solution. (I can't say anything on running times of either approach right now.) –  TaZ May 10 '12 at 11:21
    
@Taz: He asked for a version without 3000 explodes, I see only 1. this satisfies that requirement nicely I believe. Though this doesn't actually get the output he asked for... –  Kris May 10 '12 at 11:24
    
I believe he needs another explode to get the third item in every $piece. That explode would be in a loop so you get n+1 explode calls. –  TaZ May 10 '12 at 11:43

I don't remember exactly how the saying goes but...

"You have a problem and decide to use regular expressions... now you have two problems."

Your problem can easily be solved if we assume 'test:' isn't part of the actual string to be parsed.

<?php

$in = '002005@1111@333333@;10205@2000@666666@;002005@1111@55555@;';

function splitGroupsAndGetColumn($input, $groupSeparator, $columnSeparator, $columnIndex, $skipEmpty=true)
{
    $result = array();

    $groups = explode($groupSeparator, $input);
    foreach($groups as $group)
    {
        $columns = explode($columnSeparator, $group);
        if (isset($columns[$columnIndex]))
        {
            array_push($result, $columns[$columnIndex]);
        }
        else if (! $skipEmpty)
        {
            array_push($result, NULL);
        }
    }

    return $result;
}

var_dump(splitGroupsAndGetColumn($in, ';', '@', 2));

Output:

array(3) {
  [0]=>
  string(6) "333333"
  [1]=>
  string(6) "666666"
  [2]=>
  string(5) "55555"
}
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The saying must have come from somebody without knowledge of regular expressions ;-) ... at least: i wonder what makes someone think that loops are any better than regular expressions for such a simple task? –  aurora May 10 '12 at 11:26
    
I dunno, but I like regexes almost as much as the original saying. regexes are fine IMHO but not to be used like the proverbial hammer. –  Kris May 10 '12 at 11:28
    
I've seen a regexp in some book for validating e-mail addresses which spanned several pages. I think that would be a case where i would agree with you :-) –  aurora May 10 '12 at 11:31
    
A lot of code for a task that is resolves with a regex... –  Yago Riveiro May 10 '12 at 11:32
    
@harald: exactly. /([b]{2}|[^b]{2})/ –  Kris May 10 '12 at 11:59

You could use preg_match_all for this task, which makes the task quite simple:

$a = "test:002005@1111@333333@;10205@2000@666666@;002005@1111@55555@;";

preg_match_all('/@(\d+)@;/', $a, $m);

print_r($m);

$m[1] contains the output, you want.

Reference: http://php.net/manual/en/function.preg-match-all.php

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My version :)

The regex (\d+) means I want all that is a number one or more

php > $a = '002005@1111@333333@;10205@2000@666666@;002005@1111@55555@';
php > preg_match_all('/(\d+)/',$a,$matches);
php > var_dump($matches);
array(2) {
  [0]=>
  array(9) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "002005"
    [1]=>
    string(4) "1111"
    [2]=>
    string(6) "333333"
    [3]=>
    string(5) "10205"
    [4]=>
    string(4) "2000"
    [5]=>
    string(6) "666666"
    [6]=>
    string(6) "002005"
    [7]=>
    string(4) "1111"
    [8]=>
    string(5) "55555"
  }
  [1]=>
  array(9) {
    [0]=>
    string(6) "002005"
    [1]=>
    string(4) "1111"
    [2]=>
    string(6) "333333"
    [3]=>
    string(5) "10205"
    [4]=>
    string(4) "2000"
    [5]=>
    string(6) "666666"
    [6]=>
    string(6) "002005"
    [7]=>
    string(4) "1111"
    [8]=>
    string(5) "55555"
  }
}
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