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I am coding a simple web based RPG to learn to program ASP.NET MVC. When I come to the point of spells/effects I have some basic design questions. Because spells/effects work in so many different ways that it would be impractical to define models to handle spells/effects. I could make simple spells/effects so they could fit nicely in a table, but I am more interested in better functionality.

My question is how to do this best with MVC?

Should I make a controller and a view model for every spell/effects or should I just define some basic C# classes to handle spells/effects and then call them from "within MVC"? (in case of a spell activating an effect I think it would be bad design to make controllers that call each other with HTTP calls, so does that not mean It need to be C# classes)

How do I make a reference to a controller or class (So I can link my spells to my Characters)?

I am sorry that this question is a bit vague, and that is probably also why I where not able to find any resources on this. But hope you are able to help me.

More details about the game (If you need this to answer the question): Turn based hack'n'slash, battles will be on a 2D map and spells will usually need different information from this map.

Spells could be like: Chain lightning where damage and amount of jumps is based on the casters INT, passive effects, summons, "aktivation on hit" effects, a chain of effects that calls each other, "on death"-effects ect. ect.

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1  
In fact this has nothing to do with MVC. The client would sent a request with a model that would contain the used spell and actor. The calculation methods for your spells/effect belong to the domain model (BI), not the view (controller). The results of these calculations would then be transformed into a viewmodel that can be represented by the client... –  whosrdaddy May 10 '12 at 11:41
    
In addition MVC is stateless and you are creating a realtime game that needs state. So IMHO I don't think MVC is the right technology to use in this case. That's one the reason that most games of this type are FLASH based. –  whosrdaddy May 10 '12 at 11:45
    
How is that not MVC? Where is this Model defines you say the Client returns, and would that not be defined in MVC? I am trying to find out how to design this the best way. –  RobbingDaHood May 10 '12 at 11:45
    
But would you not be able to save States in the session data? –  RobbingDaHood May 10 '12 at 11:46
    
Ok I forgot to read about the turn based character of the game. Anyway the mechanics of a game, an ordering system, ... are not the concern of MVC, that's the concern of your domain model. Start from there –  whosrdaddy May 10 '12 at 11:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You first need to layout your domain model. here's small example how it could be (warning sample code, just to show the principle)

public abstract class BaseSpell
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    //... all spell related stuff
    public abstract int CalculateDamage(BaseCharacter character);
}

public class FireballSpell : BaseSpell
{
    public override int CalculateDamage(BaseCharacter character)
    {
        //return the number of damagepoints
        if (character is WizardCharacter)
            return 0;
        if (character is BarbarianCharacter)
            return 100;
    }
}

public abstract class BaseCharacter
{
    public int HitPoints { get; set; }
    public int XP { get; set; }
    public int Mana { get; set; }
    public string DieQuote { get; set; }
    // add all character related properties 

    // implemented by child classes
    public abstract void UnderSpell(BaseSpell spell);
    public abstract void UnderDamage(int damage);
    public abstract void Die();
    //...

}


public class WizardCharacter : BaseCharacter
{
    // implement wizard
    public override void UnderSpell(BaseSpell spell)
    {
        // wizards are immune to spells
        UnderDamage(spell.CalculateDamage(this));
    }

    public override void UnderDamage(int damage)
    {
        HitPoints -= damage;
        if (HitPoints <= 0)
            Die();
    }

    public override void Die()
    {
        // do whatever necessary
        DieQuote = "All your base are belong to us!!!";
    }
}

public class BarbarianCharacter : BaseCharacter
{
    public override void UnderSpell(BaseSpell spell)
    {
        // barbarians are susceptible to spells
        UnderDamage(spell.CalculateDamage(this));
    }

    public override void UnderDamage(int damage)
    {
        HitPoints -= damage;
        if (HitPoints <= 0)
            Die();
    }

    public override void Die()
    {
        // do whatever necessary
        DieQuote = "I'll be back baby!";
    }
}

Then you need to create a service layer that interacts with the different entities in the domain (characters, spells, ...) and presentation layer that extracts the data needed for representation on your webpage. For example you could have a partial view where your show the status of your character (hitpoints, mana, XP,...) This is where the Viewmodel comes into play:

// presenter

public class CharacterPresenter 
{
   public CharacterViewModel MainCharacterViewModel(){
     // fill model with main character data (ie Character class)
   }
}
// controller
 public class CharacterController : Controller
    {
        private readonly CharacterPresenter characterPresenter;

        public CharacterController ()
        {
            characterPresenter = new CharacterPresenter;
        }

        public ActionResult Info()
        {
            var model = characterPresenter.MainCharacterViewModel();
            return View(model);
        }
        // and so on... 

    }

Viewmodels are used to convey data between your controller and service layer. Typically they don't expose behaviour, that's what domain models are for...

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Thank you, I just found out 2 hours ago that my understanding of the models where to narrow and that they can function as a class on its own completely. –  RobbingDaHood May 11 '12 at 12:16

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