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I'm struggling to get the following done:

Example dataset:

   belongID   uniqID   Time   Rating  
   1           101       5      0  
   1           102       4      0  
   2           103       4      0  
   2           104       3      0  
   2           105       2      5
   3           106       4      2  
   3           107       5      0  
   3           108       5      1 

The problem is: I would like to extract the most recent entry (largest value for time) per belongID, unless this rating is 0. If the rating of the most recent entry is 0 however. I want the first entry with a rating (not the highest rating, just the first value with a rating that is not zero). If all other entries are also zero, the most recent one needs to be selected.

The end result should than be:

   belongID   uniqID   Time   Rating  
   1           101       5      0  
   2           105       2      5
   3           108       5      1  

The dataset is pretty large and is ordered by belongID. It is not ordered by time, so more recent entries may come after older entries with the same belongID.

Without having the "0 Rating" constraint, I used the following function to calculate the most recent entry:

>uniqueMax <- function(m, belongID = 1, time = 3) {
    t(
      vapply(
         split(1:nrow(m), m[,belongID]), 
         function(i, x, time) x[i, , drop=FALSE][which.max(x[i,time]),], m[1,], x=m, time=time
      )
    )
 }

I do not know how to incorporate the "0 Rating" constraint.

EDIT: A follow up question:

Does anyone know how the getRating function should be altered if not only rating zero, but more ratings need to be taken into account (for instance 0,1,4 and 5)? Thus assign to most recent, unless Rating 0 or 1 or 4 or 5? If Rating is 0,1,4,5 assign to most recent entry with a different rating. If all ratings are 0,1,4 or 5 assign to the most recent of those. I tried the following, but that did not work:

getRating <- function(x){
  iszero <- x$Rating == 0 | x$Rating == 1 | x$Rating == 4 | x$Rating ==5
  if(all(iszero)){
    id <- which.max(x$Time)
  } else {
    id <- which.max((!iszero)*x$Time) 
            # This trick guarantees taking 0 into account
  }
  x[id,]
}
# Do this over the complete data frame
do.call(rbind,lapply(split(Data,Data$belongID),getRating)) 
     # edited per Tyler's suggestion'
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a solution that uses data.table for ease of filtering and performing my function getRecentRow separately for each belongID.

library(data.table)

# Load the data from the example.
dat = structure(list(belongID = c(1L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 3L, 3L, 3L), 
          uniqID = 101:108, Time = c(5L, 4L, 4L, 3L, 2L, 4L, 5L, 5L),
          Rating = c(0L, 0L, 0L, 0L, 5L, 2L, 0L, 1L)), 
          .Names = c("belongID", "uniqID", "Time", "Rating"),
          row.names = c(NA, -8L), class = c("data.table", "data.frame"))

dat = data.table(dat) # Convert to data table.

# Function to get the row for a given belongID
getRecentRow <- function(data) {
    # Filter by Rating, then order by time, then select first.
    row = data[Rating != 0][order(-Time)][1]

    if(!is.na(row$uniqID)) {
        # A row was found with Rating != 0, return it.
        return(row)
     } else {
          # The row was blank, so filter again without restricting. rating.
          return(data[order(-Time)][1])
        }  
}

# Run getRecentRow on each chunk of dat with a given belongID
result = dat[,getRecentRow(.SD), by=belongID]

     belongID uniqID Time Rating
[1,]        1    101    5      0
[2,]        2    105    2      5
[3,]        3    108    5      1
share|improve this answer
    
Just seen this answer, nice +1. It should be faster than the accepted answer I would have thought. Btw, instead of data[order(-Time)][1], data[order(-Time)[1]] should be much faster. The first way reorders all columns, then takes the first row of that. The 2nd way finds the row needed and just takes it. The more the number of columns, the faster the 2nd way should be. –  Matt Dowle Jun 15 '12 at 17:25

Here's my crack at it (interesting problem):

Reading in your data:

m <- read.table(text="belongID   uniqID   Time   Rating  
   1           101       5      0  
   1           102       4      0  
   2           103       4      0  
   2           104       3      0  
   2           105       2      5
   3           106       4      2  
   3           107       5      0  
   3           108       5      1 ", header=T)

Extracting the rows you asked for:

m2 <- m[order(m$belongID, -m$Time), ]                 #Order to get max time first
LIST <- split(m2, m$belongID)                         #split by belongID
FUN <- function(x) which(cumsum(x[, 'Rating'])!=0)[1] #find first non zero Rating
LIST2 <- lapply(LIST, function(x){                    #apply FUN; if NA do 1st row
        if (is.na(FUN(x))) {
            x[1, ]
        } else {
            x[FUN(x), ]
        }
    }
)
do.call('rbind', LIST2)                              #put it all back together

Which yields:

  belongID uniqID Time Rating
1        1    101    5      0
2        2    105    2      5
3        3    108    5      1

EDIT With so many people answering this problem (fun to solve IMHO) it begged for a microbenchmark test (Windows 7):

Unit: milliseconds
    expr       min        lq    median        uq      max
1   JIGR  6.356293  6.656752  7.024161  8.697213 179.0884
2 JORRIS  2.932741  3.031416  3.153420  3.552554 246.9604
3  PETER 10.851046 11.459896 12.358939 17.164881 216.7284
4  TYLER  2.864625  2.961667  3.066174  3.413289 221.1569

And a graph:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
I suspect that Jorris's solution would be even faster without the use of by and go with a split lapply approach instead as by can slow you down. –  Tyler Rinker May 10 '12 at 13:37
    
Suspicion confirmed :) –  Tyler Rinker May 10 '12 at 13:40
    
+1 for the comparison, that iss very interesting –  rengis May 10 '12 at 13:41
    
@TylerRinker : Very correct, but I was too lazy to add that to my solution. PS: My name is written with one R ;-) –  Joris Meys May 10 '12 at 13:42
    
@JorisMeyers sorry about that but I too am to lazy to fix it now :) For the future I will spell it correctly (less typing too). –  Tyler Rinker May 10 '12 at 13:46

One suggestion would be:

library(plyr)

maxV <- function(b) {
    if (b[which.max(b$Time), "Rating"]  != 0) {
        return(b[which.max(b$Time), ])
    } else if (!all(b$Rating==0)) {
        bb <- b[order(b$Rating), ]
        return(bb[bb$Rating != 0,][1, ])
    } else {
        return(b[which.max(b$Time),])
    }
}

a <- read.table(textConnection(" belongID   uniqID   Time   Rating  
   1           101       5      0  
   1           102       4      0  
   2           103       4      0  
   2           104       3      0  
   2           105       2      5
   3           106       4      2  
   3           107       5      0  
   3           108       5      1 "), header=T)

ddply(a, .(belongID), maxV)
  belongID uniqID Time Rating
1        1    101    5      0
2        2    105    2      5
3        3    108    5      1
share|improve this answer

EDIT :

As speed is your main concern, I edited my trick into your initial solution, which results in something like this:

uniqueMax <- function(m, belongID = 1, time = 3) {
  t(
    vapply(
      split(1:nrow(m), m[,belongID]), 
      function(i, x, time){ 
        is.zero <- x[i,'Rating'] == 0
        if(all(is.zero)) is.zero <- FALSE
        x[i, , drop=FALSE][which.max(x[i,time]*(!is.zero)),]
      }
      , m[1,], x=m, time=time
      )
    )
}

My original solution, which is a bit more readible than the previous one :

# Get the rating per belongID
getRating <- function(x){
  iszero <- x$Rating == 0
  if(all(iszero)){
    id <- which.max(x$Time)
  } else {
    id <- which.max((!iszero)*x$Time) 
            # This trick guarantees taking 0 into account
  }
  x[id,]
}
# Do this over the complete data frame
do.call(rbind,lapply(split(Data,Data$belongID),getRating)) 
     # edited per Tyler's suggestion

The result :

tc <- textConnection('
belongID   uniqID   Time   Rating  
   1           101       5      0  
   1           102       4      0  
   2           103       4      0  
   2           104       3      0  
   2           105       2      5
   3           106       4      2  
   3           107       5      0  
   3           108       5      1 ')

Data <- read.table(tc,header=TRUE)

do.call(rbind,lapply(split(Data,Data$belongID),getRating)) 

to give :

  belongID uniqID Time Rating
1        1    101    5      0
2        2    105    2      5
3        3    108    5      1

EDIT : Just for fun, I did a benchmarking as well (using rbenchmark) on a small data set with 1000 replications, and a big one with 10 replications :

The outcome :

> benchmark(Joris(Data),Tyler(Data),uniqueMax(Data),
+           columns=c("test","elapsed","relative"),
+           replications=1000)
             test elapsed relative
1     Joris(Data)    1.20 1.025641
2     Tyler(Data)    1.42 1.213675
3 uniqueMax(Data)    1.17 1.000000

> benchmark(Joris(Data2),Tyler(Data2),uniqueMax(Data2),
+           columns=c("test","elapsed","relative"),
+           replications=10)
              test elapsed relative
1     Joris(Data2)    3.63 1.174757
2     Tyler(Data2)    4.02 1.300971
3 uniqueMax(Data2)    3.09 1.000000

Here I just wrapped a function Joris() and Tyler() around our solutions, and created Data2 as follows :

Data2 <- data.frame(
  belongID = rep(1:1000,each=10),
  uniqID = 1:10000,
  Time = sample(1:5,10000,TRUE),
  Rating = sample(0:5,10000,TRUE)
  )
share|improve this answer
    
I corrected the wanted output in your question by now. –  Joris Meys May 10 '12 at 13:25
1  
I timed your solution (the fasted suggested by Tyler) by applying it to my current data set (170.000+ rows) and it took 174.063 seconds. Please note that the data file did not consist only of those field. It has a total of 19 columns. Thank you very much! –  Max van der Heijden May 10 '12 at 14:04
    
@MaxvanderHeijden You can get a small extra speedup by applying my little trick to your own solution, as shown in my second edit. Further optimization is possible, but requires a bit more index work. Maybe tonight I'll have another go. –  Joris Meys May 10 '12 at 14:26
    
Very Nice Follow Up –  Tyler Rinker May 11 '12 at 3:41

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