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I am trying to write a program that displays the integers between 1 and 100 that are divisible by either 6 or 7 but not both.

Here is my code:

import acm.program.*;

public class Problem4 extends ConsoleProgram
{
    public void run()
    {
        for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++)
        {
            boolean num = ((i % 6 == 0) || (i % 7 == 0));

            if (num == true)
            println(i + " is divisible");
        }
    }
}

The above code shows the following answers: 6,7,12,14,18,21,24,28,30,35,36,42,48,49,54,56,60,63,66,70,72,77,78,84,90,91,96,98

Now the bold numbers 42 and 84 are both divisbile by 6 and 7. Now If I change the || to && in the above code, the result shows only 42 and 84.

What change should I do to remove these 2 numbers from the final result?

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you should change the num == true to just num –  Woot4Moo Feb 26 '11 at 3:36

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

you have to make your condition look like:

boolean num = (i % 6 == 0 || i % 7 == 0) && !(i % 6 == 0 && i % 7 == 0);

that's basically converting "but not both" to Java code :)

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Dang, i had this in my mind but did not try it out. –  Ibn Saeed Jun 27 '09 at 19:24
4  
You can almost translate it to words: (divisible-by-6 OR divisible-by-7) AND NOT (divisible-by-6 AND divisible-by-7) –  Yuval Adam Jun 27 '09 at 19:29
    
Thanks Yuval, that helps as well. –  Ibn Saeed Jun 27 '09 at 19:33
2  
Why not use the XOR operator "a ^ b" which is equivalent to "(a || b) && !(a && b)" –  oxbow_lakes Jun 28 '09 at 13:16
    
the XOR version is more cryptic, although it works the same. –  cd1 Jun 28 '09 at 15:01

XOR is the way to go.

import acm.program.*;

public class Problem4 extends ConsoleProgram {
  public void run() {
    for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++) {
      if ( (i % 6 == 0) ^ (i % 7 == 0) ) {
        println(i + " is divisible");
      }
    }
  }
}
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2  
I think I will return my developer license. –  kd304 Jun 27 '09 at 19:29
    
My book only defines 3 logical operators: 1). ! 2). && 3). || It did not mention XOR (^) –  Ibn Saeed Jun 27 '09 at 19:30
1  
Xor is a binary operator. A ^ B means A or B but not both. != can be used as equivalent on booleans if ^ looks too alien to you, Ibn Saeed. –  ggf31416 Jun 27 '09 at 19:34
1  
I woud remove the == true –  ggf31416 Jun 27 '09 at 19:37
1  
@duffymo: This is why they don't use XOR gates to build chips, or use XOR for cryptographic purposes. Not to mention image manipulation through XOR. "Make everything as simple as possible, but not simpler." - Albert Einstein ;) –  kd304 Jun 28 '09 at 10:14

You need an extra check for "but not both". I think it should be:

boolean num = ((i % 6 == 0) || (i % 7 == 0)) && (i % 42 != 0);

share|improve this answer
    
I already have that in my code boolean num = ((i % 6 == 0) || (i % 7 == 0)); –  Ibn Saeed Jun 27 '09 at 19:20
    
Hit the enter too quickly. See edited result. Your problem isn't Java, it's logic. –  duffymo Jun 27 '09 at 19:21
    
But your code is more of a hack rather than a solution as 42 and 84 are not known in advance. –  Ibn Saeed Jun 27 '09 at 19:23
1  
yes they are. "but not both" says it all. mine will catch 42, 84, and every other multiple of 6*7. That's what "but not both" means. –  duffymo Jun 27 '09 at 19:55
1  
I like this. 42 isn't a hack, as suggested above. It's the LCM of 6 and 7, so any number that's divisible by 42 will, of course, be divisible by both 6 and 7. Nice. –  mtnygard Jun 27 '09 at 20:15

you can also try

boolean num = ((i % 6 == 0) != (i % 7 == 0));
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For booleans, ^ does the same thing as != (see truth tables). After all, logical bicondition (xnor) is logical equality, and exclusive or is its negation. I happen to prefer !=, mainly because some languages I use don't have boolean xor, and != more-than-suffices. Many of the other examples include duplicate mod calculations, which is not terrible, but mod can slow tight code down :) –  Gracenotes Jun 27 '09 at 21:45
    
wonderful....... with just NOT_EQUAL to operator and mod... XOR of two no. implementation....... –  CoolEulerProject Mar 2 '13 at 9:07

Think about what it means to be divisible by 6 and 7... the answer to life the universe and everything.

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1  
"The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy" rocks) –  Rorick Jun 27 '09 at 19:36
    
I agree :). Thank you. –  kd304 Jun 27 '09 at 20:49
import acm.program.*;

public class Problem4 extends ConsoleProgram
{
    public void run()
    {
        for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++)
        {
            boolean num = ((i % 6 == 0) || (i % 7 == 0));
            boolean both = ((i % 6 == 0) && (i % 7 == 0));

            if ((num == true) &&  (both == false))
            println(i + " is divisible");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Rorick, it was right in front of me :) This solved the problem. –  Ibn Saeed Jun 27 '09 at 19:22
    
You're welcome) –  Rorick Jun 27 '09 at 19:37

Here is a snippet that should work as well- in C++ but change to boolean...

int value;
if ((value % 6 == 0 && value % 7 != 0) || (value % 6 != 0 && value % 7 == 0))
    cout << "Is " << value << " divisible by 6 or 7, but not both? true" << endl;
  else
    cout << "Is " << value << " divisible by 6 or 7, but not both? false" << endl;
share|improve this answer

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