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While writing a simple library to parse a game's data files, I noticed that reading an entire data file into memory and parsing from there was significantly faster (by up to 15x, 106s v 7s).

Parsing is usually sequential but seeks will be done every now and then to read some data stored elsewhere in a file, linked by an offset.

I realise that parsing from memory will definitely be faster, but something is wrong if the difference is so significant. I wrote some code to simulate this:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Stopwatch n = new Stopwatch();

    n.Start();
    byte[] b = File.ReadAllBytes(@"D:\Path\To\Large\File");
    using (MemoryStream s = new MemoryStream(b, false))
        RandomRead(s);
    n.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Memory read done in {0}.", n.Elapsed);
    b = null;
    n.Reset();
    n.Start();
    using (FileStream s = File.Open(@"D:\Path\To\Large\File", FileMode.Open))
        RandomRead(s);
    n.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("File read done in {0}.", n.Elapsed);
    Console.ReadLine();
}
private static void RandomRead(Stream s)
{
    // simulate a mostly sequential, but sometimes random, read
    using (BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(s)) {
        long l = s.Length;
        Random r = new Random();
        int c = 0;
        while (l > 0) {
            l -= br.ReadBytes(r.Next(1, 5)).Length;
            if (c++ <= r.Next(10, 15)) continue;
            // simulate seeking
            long o = s.Position;
            s.Position = r.Next(0, (int)s.Length);
            l -= br.ReadBytes(r.Next(1, 5)).Length;
            s.Position = o;
            c = 0;
        }
    }
}

I used one of the game's data files as input to this. That file was about 102 MB, and it produced this result (Memory read done in 00:00:03.3092618. File read done in 00:00:32.6495245.) which has memory reading about 11x faster than file.

The memory read was done before the file read to try and improve its speed via the file cache. It's still that much slower.

I've tried increasing or decreasing FileStream's buffer size; nothing produced significantly better results, and increasing or decreasing it too much just worsened the speed.

Is there something I'm doing wrong, or is this to be expected? Is there any way to at least make the slowdown less significant?

Why is reading the entire file at once and then parsing it so much faster than reading and parsing simultaneously?

I've actually compared to a similar library written in C++, which uses the Windows native CreateFileMapping and MapViewOfFile to read files, and it's very fast. Could it be the constant switching from managed to unmanaged and the involved marshaling that causes this?

I've also tried MemoryMappedFiles present in .NET 4; the speed gain was only about one second.

share|improve this question
    
What are you measuring? Are you measuring the time it takes to read the whole file from disk and process it, or just the in-memory processing?\ –  Steven May 10 '12 at 13:05
    
Only way to make the slowdown less noticable is to switch to solid state drives. –  Brian May 10 '12 at 13:05
    
@Steven: I'm measuring the entire process of reading and processing, which when reading from disk would be quite intertwined together. –  angelsl May 10 '12 at 13:07
    
To be fair, you should also swap these two lines. byte[] b = File.ReadAllBytes(@"D:\Path\To\Large\File");n.Start(); You're not counting the time it takes to load the file into memory. –  Chris Haas May 10 '12 at 13:08
1  
"To put this into perspective, reading from L1 cache is like grabbing a piece of paper from your desk (3 seconds), L2 cache is picking up a book from a nearby shelf (14 seconds), and main system memory is taking a 4-minute walk down the hall to buy a Twix bar. "..."waiting for a hard drive seek is like leaving the building to roam the earth for one year and three months." duartes.org/gustavo/blog/post/… –  tMC May 10 '12 at 15:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is there something I'm doing wrong, or is this to be expected?

No, nothing wrong. This is entirely expected. That accessing the disk is an order of magnitude slower than accessing memory is more than reasonable.


Update:

That a single read of the file followed by processing is faster than processing while reading is also expected.

Doing a large IO operation and processing in memory would be faster than getting a bit from disk, processing it, calling the disk again (waiting for the IO to complete), processing that bit etc...

share|improve this answer
    
This does not answer the OPs question. Apparently there is a difference in time it takes between reading the whole file at once and then processing it, and reading bit by bit and processing it bit by bit (see his comment). –  Steven May 10 '12 at 13:10
    
@Steven - Fair enough. Explained why a single read would be faster than multiple reads as processing occurs. –  Oded May 10 '12 at 13:13

Is there something I'm doing wrong, or is this to be expected?

A harddisk has, compared to RAM, huge access times. Sequential reads are pretty speedy, but as soon as the heads have to move (because data is fragmented) it takes lots of milliseconds to get the next bit of data, during which your application is idling.

Is there any way to at least make the slowdown less significant?

Buy an SSD.

You also can take a look at Memory-Mapped Files for .NET:

MemoryMappedFile.CreateFromFile().


As for your edit: I'd go with @Oded and say that reading the file on beforehand adds a penalty. However, that should not cause the method that first reads the whole file to be seven times as slow as 'process-as-you-read'.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not answer the OPs question. Apparently there is a difference in time it takes between reading the whole file at once and then processing it, and reading bit by bit and processing it bit by bit (see his comment). –  Steven May 10 '12 at 13:10
    
I've actually also tried memory mapped files for .NET; the speed gain was only about 1 second, so there's still something wrong there. I'll include this in my question though. –  angelsl May 10 '12 at 13:13

I decided to do some benchmarks comparing various ways of reading a file in C++ and C#. First I created a 256mb file. In the c++ benchmarks, buffered means I first copied the entire file to a buffer then read the data from the buffer. All the benchmarks read the file, directly or indirectly, byte by byte sequentially and calculate a checksum. All times are measured from the moment I open the file until I am completely done and the file is closed. All benchmarks were run multiple times to maintain consistent OS file caching.

C++
Unbuffered memory mapped file: 300ms
Buffered memory mapped file: 500ms
Unbuffered fread: 23,000ms
Buffered fread: 500ms
Unbuffered ifstream: 26,000ms
Buffered ifstream: 700ms

C#
MemoryMappedFile: 112,000ms
FileStream: 2,800ms
MemoryStream: 2,300ms
ReadAllBytes: 600ms

Interpret the data as you wish. C#'s memory mapped files are slower than even the worst case c++ code, whereas c++'s memory mapped files are the fastest things around. C#'s ReadAllBytes is decently fast, only twice as slow as c++'s memory mapped files. So if you want the best performance I recommend you use ReadAllBytes and then access the data directly from the array without using a stream.

share|improve this answer
    
That's what I'm doing when reading purely from memory, but then I'd have to have the entire file in memory, and that's quite restrictive in terms of memory left to parse the file. –  angelsl May 10 '12 at 14:57

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