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I'm wondering if there's an easy way to 're-write' the value displayed by a JavaScript variable on a HTML5 canvas when the actual value of the variable has been updated by the user?

For example, I'm using the HTML5 canvas and JavaScript to write a very simple game to teach users some basic Welsh.

Currently, I have two arrays: one containing 10 .png images for the numbers 1-10, and the other containing 10 strings for the Welsh words for the numbers 1-10.

When the user views the page, the canvas displays a 'start game' button, which when clicked, draws one random element from the images array, and one random element from the words array, as well as an image of a tick and a cross.

If the image and the word represent the same number, the user should click the tick, if they do not, the user should click the cross. If the user makes the right selection- I have a currentScore variable whose value is increased by 5 (initiated at 0), if they make the wrong selection, the value of currentScore remains the same.

When I view the page in the browser, and play the game, if I click on the tick when the image and word represent the number, I can see that the value of currentScore is increased by 5 in the console, but the value of currentScore displayed on the canvas remains the same. Similarly, if I click the cross when they do not match, the score is increased in the console, but not on the canvas.

So the logic behind the code is right, and it works, I'm just not sure how I can get the value displayed for currentScore to be updated on the canvas each time its actual value is updated.

The function I'm using to do this is below:

function drawLevelOneElements(){
            /*First, clear the canvas */ 
            context.clearRect(0, 0, myGameCanvas.width, myGameCanvas.height);
            /*This line clears all of the elements that were previously drawn on the canvas. */
            /*Then redraw the game elements */
            drawGameElements(); 

            /*Create an array of words for numbers 1-10 */
            var wordsArray = new Array();
            wordsArray[0] = "Un";
            wordsArray[1] = "Dau";
            wordsArray[2] = "Tri";
            wordsArray[3] = "Pedwar";
            wordsArray[4] = "Pump";
            wordsArray[5] = "Chwech";
            wordsArray[6] = "Saith";
            wordsArray[7] = "Wyth";
            wordsArray[8] = "Naw";
            wordsArray[9] = "Deg";

            /*Use Math.random() to generate a random number between 1 & 10 to draw the word and image to the canvas */
            var drawnImage = Math.floor(Math.random()*10);
            var drawnWord = Math.floor(Math.random()*10);

            /*Draw an image and a word to the canvas just to test that they're being drawn */
            context.drawImage(imageArray[drawnImage], 100, 30, 30, 30);
            context.strokeText(wordsArray[drawnWord], 500, 60);

            /*Now draw the tick and cross to the canvas */
            context.font = "30pt Calibri"; /*Set text font and size */
            context.drawImage(tick, 250, 200, 50, 50);
            context.drawImage(cross, 350, 200, 50, 50);

            /*Add an event listener to the page to listen for a click on the tick or the cross, if the user clicks
                the right one to indicate whether the image and word relate to the same number or not, increase the
                user's score*/
            myGameCanvas.addEventListener('click', function(e){
                console.log('click: ' + e.pageX + '/' + e.pageY);
                var mouseX = e.pageX - this.offsetLeft;
                var mouseY = e.pageY - this.offsetTop;
                /*If the tick is clicked, check whether or not the image and word represent the same number, if they do,
                    increase the score, if not, leave the score as it is*/
                if((mouseX > 250 && mouseX < 300) && (mouseY > 200 && mouseY < 250) && (drawnImage == drawnWord)){ 
                    currentScore = currentScore + 5;
                    console.log('Current Score = ' + currentScore);
                } else if((mouseX > 250 && mouseX < 300) && (mouseY > 200 && mouseY < 250) && (drawnImage != drawnWord)){
                    currentScore = currentScore; 
                    console.log('Current Score = ' + currentScore);

                /*If the cross is clicked, check whether or not the image and word represent the same number, if they 
                    don't, increase the score, otherwise, leave the score as it is*/
                } else if((mouseX > 350 && mouseX < 400) && (mouseY > 200 && mouseY < 250) && (drawnImage != drawnWord)){
                    currentScore = currentScore + 5;
                    console.log('Current Score = ' + currentScore);
                } else if ((mouseX > 350 && mouseX < 400) && (mouseY > 200 && mouseY < 250) && (drawnImage == drawnWord)){
                    currentScore = currentScore; 
                    console.log('Current Score = '+ currentScore); 
                } else {
                    console.log('The click was not on either the tick or the cross.');
                }
            }, false);

I wouldn't have thought it would require too much code to do this, but I just can't work out how to do it. Any help would be much appreciated. Thanks!

*EDIT*

I've added the code in as you suggested, but the score displayed on the canvas is still not updated for some reason...

if((mouseX > 250 && mouseX < 300) && (mouseY > 200 && mouseY < 250) && (drawnImage == drawnWord)){ 
                    currentScore = currentScore + 5;
                    context.clearRect(currentScorePositionX, currentScorePositionY, 20, 20); /*Clear the old score from the canvas */
                    context.strokeText(currentScore, 650, 15); /*Now write the new score to the canvas */
                    console.log('Current Score = ' + currentScore);
                } else if((mouseX > 250 && mouseX < 300) && (mouseY > 200 && mouseY < 250) && (drawnImage != drawnWord)){
                    currentScore = currentScore; 
                    console.log('Current Score = ' + currentScore);

Any suggestions?

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4 Answers 4

Building on what Ed Kirk said, you can detect when the score variable has changed by comparing it against itself every so often (say, 50 milliseconds for starters).

Example:

var myScore = 0;
var myOldScore = myScore;

setInterval(function() { 
    if(myScore != myOldScore) {
        myOldScore = myScore;
        // the variable has changed, write it to the canvas
    }
}, 50); // will execute every 50 milliseconds
share|improve this answer
    
The problem I'm having is not detecting whether the score variable has changed or not- I know that it has, since it displays the updated value in the firebug console every time I click the tick or the cross. My problem is showing the updated value on the canvas... –  someone2088 May 10 '12 at 13:52
    
This is a better method for updating, it's more reliable in the long run and helps prevent too many screen updates from taking place and degrading performance. If your score starts changing every 2ms your soon gonna grind to a halt. –  Ed Kirk May 10 '12 at 14:02

You need to clear a part or all of your canvas and redraw it in order to update the canvas display. You are already doing this in the first line of drawLevelOneElements() - you clear the whole screen. To clear just a section you can do:

context.clearRect(x, y, scoreDigitWidth, scoreDigitHeight);

x and y are the coordinate of your score digit and scoreDigitWidth and scoreDigitHeight the width and height. Then you can fill this cleared area using context.drawImage(). You could initiate the process using a continually loop updating the frame or if it doesn't need updating often just run it after line:

currentScore = currentScore;

I.e when you know the new score.

You're normally better clearing and redrawing just what has changed on the canvas instead of all of it. Here's a good article on performance. http://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/canvas/performance/.

It looks like quite a simple animation, you might be better off using just html elements (divs, imgs, etc) instead of the canvas, this will allow users with browsers that don't support the canvas element to still use it, namely IE8<.

share|improve this answer
    
I initally used context.strokeText() to to write the score there, rather than context.drawImage(), so presumable, I could just use strokeText again to write the new score there after clearing that rectangle? –  someone2088 May 10 '12 at 13:32
    
Yes, although you will need to be careful about whether your font uses a different width on different characters. If you replace a 1 with a 0 it might overlap the next digit. So you might want to draw each digit separately with appropriate spacing at the start or the lazier method, clear the whole score string and re-draw it. –  Ed Kirk May 10 '12 at 13:40
    
I'd also consider wether using canvas is essential or whether using standard html div and img elements is a better method. –  Ed Kirk May 10 '12 at 13:43
    
I'm at uni, and this is an assignment which is intended to give us experience of using the canvas... –  someone2088 May 10 '12 at 13:45
    
I've done what you suggested- and added those two lines in, but the score on the canvas is still not updated... I've edited my original post to show the code I've added in. –  someone2088 May 10 '12 at 13:49

I've made a few changes to my function, and now have the follwing code:

/*Add an event listener to the page to listen for a click on the tick or the cross, if the user clicks
                the right one to indicate whether the image and word relate to the same number or not, increase the
                user's score*/
            myGameCanvas.addEventListener('click', function(e){
                console.log('click: ' + e.pageX + '/' + e.pageY);
                var mouseX = e.pageX - this.offsetLeft;
                var mouseY = e.pageY - this.offsetTop;
                /*If the tick is clicked, check whether or not the image and word represent the same number, if they do,
                    increase the score, if not, leave the score as it is*/
                if((mouseX > 250 && mouseX < 300) && (mouseY > 200 && mouseY < 250) && (drawnImage == drawnWord)){ 
                    currentScore = currentScore + 5;
                    var scorePositionX = currentScorePositionX;
                    var scorePositionY = currentScorePositionY;
                    context.clearRect(scorePositionX, scorePositionY, 30, 30); /*Clear the old score from the canvas */
                    context.strokeText(currentScore, 650, 50); /*Now write the new score to the canvas */
                    console.log('Current Score = ' + currentScore);
                } else if((mouseX > 250 && mouseX < 300) && (mouseY > 200 && mouseY < 250) && (drawnImage != drawnWord)){
                    currentScore = currentScore; 
                    console.log('Current Score = ' + currentScore);

                /*If the cross is clicked, check whether or not the image and word represent the same number, if they 
                    don't, increase the score, otherwise, leave the score as it is*/
                } else if((mouseX > 350 && mouseX < 400) && (mouseY > 200 && mouseY < 250) && (drawnImage != drawnWord)){
                    currentScore = currentScore + 5;
                    context.clearRect(currentScorePositionX, currentScorePositionY, 20, 20); /*Clear the old score from the canvas */
                    context.strokeText(currentScore, 500, 50); /*Now write the new score to the canvas */
                    console.log('Current Score = ' + currentScore);
                } else if ((mouseX > 350 && mouseX < 400) && (mouseY > 200 && mouseY < 250) && (drawnImage == drawnWord)){
                    currentScore = currentScore; 
                    console.log('Current Score = '+ currentScore); 
                } else {
                    console.log('The click was not on either the tick or the cross.');
                }
            }, false);

This is now displaying the current score, and updating it every time the user correctly selects the tick or the cross, however, when drawing the new score to the canvas each time, rather than removing the previous drawing of the score and writing the new score in its place, it simply writes it over the top, so both the old score and the new score are displayed in the same location- which is a bit of a mess, and makes it hard to read.

Also, the location and font & size of the score are not where I had intended- I had intended that it be displayed in my 'score bar' as previously mentioned, however, it is now displayed below the score bar, on the main 'display' section of the canvas. Also the font is different- the numbers are not displayed as usual characters, i.e. 5, 10, etc, but the font is larger, and is like 'bubble writing', with white space in the middle of the digits. The font is also much larger- at least twice the size of the text I have displayed in the 'score bar'.

Could someone point out to me what I'm doing wrong here? Thanks very much!

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This should be asked in a new question. –  Elliot Bonneville May 10 '12 at 23:11
    
@danp You said "Something that may not have occurred to you, is that canvas elements can be transparent, and stacked on top of each other. This way, you could have a GUI only canvas, and an action canvas, and keep them separate. Absolute positioning will make this work, if you're not confident in css, and want an example, just say." Would it be possible to have an example of this? –  Someone2088 May 10 '12 at 23:48

Something that may not have occurred to you, is that canvas elements can be transparent, and stacked on top of each other. This way, you could have a GUI only canvas, and an action canvas, and keep them separate. Absolute positioning will make this work, if you're not confident in css, and want an example, just say.

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