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I have a collection of Animal objects.

My core code wants to treat all of these as Animals, all the same. Each Animal needs to be processed in some way. The nature of the processing depends on the sub-type of the Animal (bird, mammal, etc).

My code currently looks as follows.

public interface Animal {
    public String getTaxonomyClass(); 
}

public abstract class Bird implements Animal {

    @Override
    public String getTaxonomyClass() {
        return "aves";
    }

    // Specific to birds
    public abstract float getWingspan();

}

public abstract class Mammal implements Animal {

    @Override
    public String getTaxonomyClass() {
        return "mammalia";
    }

    // Specific to mammals
    public abstract int getToothCount();

}

public interface AnimalProcessor {
    public String getSupportedTaxonomyClass();
    public void process(Animal a);
}

public class MammalProcessor implements AnimalProcessor {

    @Override
    public String getSupportedTaxonomyClass() {
        return "mammalia";
    }

    @Override
    public void process(Animal a) {
        System.out.println("Tooth count is " + ((Mammal)a).getToothCount());
    }

}

public class BirdProcessor implements AnimalProcessor {

    @Override
    public String getSupportedTaxonomyClass() {
        return "aves";
    }

    @Override
    public void process(Animal a) {
        System.out.print("Wingspan is " + ((Bird)a).getWingspan());
    }

}

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;

public class ZooKeeper {

    Map<String, AnimalProcessor> registry = new HashMap<String, AnimalProcessor>();

    public void registerProcessor(AnimalProcessor ap)
    {
        registry.put(ap.getSupportedTaxonomyClass(), ap);
    }

    public void processNewAnimals(List<Animal> newcomers)
    {
        for(Animal critter : newcomers)
        {
            String taxonomy = critter.getTaxonomyClass();
            if(registry.containsKey(taxonomy))
            {
                // if I can process the animal, I will
                AnimalProcessor ap = registry.get(taxonomy);
                ap.process(critter);
            }

        }
    }
}

import java.util.LinkedList;
import java.util.List;

public class MainClass {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        ZooKeeper keeper = new ZooKeeper();
        keeper.registerProcessor(new MammalProcessor());
        keeper.registerProcessor(new BirdProcessor());

        List<Animal> animals = new LinkedList<Animal>();

        animals.add(new Mammal() {  // badger

            @Override
            public int getToothCount() {
                return 40;
            } } 
        );

        animals.add(new Bird() {  // condor

            @Override
            public float getWingspan() {
                return 2.9f;
            } }
        );

        keeper.processNewAnimals(animals);

    }
}

Generally this is easy to understand and works nicely! I can add plug-in new processors and animal types at my leisure without changing the ZooKeeper class or any of the interfaces. You can imagine a more advanced main class, loading the Animals from a database, and processing them all in turn.

However, I worry about the downcasts inside the AnimalProcessor subclasses! This strikes me as something which should not be there, and may be a violation of OO principles. After all, at the moment I can pass a Bird to a MammalProcessor's process() method, and there will be a ClassCastException.

Can anyone suggest a design pattern to solve this? I looked at the Visitor pattern, but couldn't quite figure out how to apply it in this case! The key is to make the core code (ZooKeeper) treat all animals the same, and make it so that support for new Animals can be added trivially. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
For the record, the real life system is sadly not a zoo-keeping system.. it is the core of a system for handling general numerical models (think, different kinds of templates which need to be evaluated)! I stripped it down to the basics for this example. –  pjm56 May 10 '12 at 15:43
1  
Sadly I don't get to play with penguins on a daily basis. –  pjm56 May 10 '12 at 15:43
    
By the way, I believe this is OK from a Liskov Substitution Principle point of view... anywhere where the code currently uses Animal, you can substitute Mammal or Bird without breaking it. –  pjm56 May 11 '12 at 11:03
    
If your question has been answered, or if it is no longer valid, please 'tick' to choose the most appropriate answer so everyone knows that the problem has been resolved. Thanks. –  WATTO Studios May 14 '12 at 13:41
1  
It was never truly resolved, but I've given credit to the most complete assistance. –  pjm56 May 15 '12 at 9:22

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would suggest the following:

public interface Animal {
    public AnimalProcessor<? extends Animal> getProcessor();
}

so each animal will return it's matching processor.

public interface AnimalProcessor<T extends Animal> {
     public void process(T a);
}

so the processors will be typed with their matching type it's should process. so the implantation will be like this:

public abstract class Bird implements Animal {
    private BirdProcessor processor = new BirdProcessor();
    public abstract float getWingspan();
    @Override
    public AnimalProcessor<Bird> getProcessor() {
        return processor; 
    }
}

public class BirdProcessor implements AnimalProcessor<Bird> {
    @Override
    public void process(Bird b) {
        System.out.print("Wingspan is " + b.getWingspan());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Shem - this approach takes me so close to getting the whole thing working, but then I run into problems in keeper.processNewAnimals(..). I get warnings with the code as it stands, because of the raw types. However, if I try to parameterise, I invariably run into a type conflict somewhere. –  pjm56 May 11 '12 at 11:01
1  
yap, this is still not perfect, because some programmer can return a AnimalProcessor<Bird> on Mammal.getProcessor(). you probably gonna have to live with this raw typing warnings (although you know that you not getting type cast exception), until java will implement the it's generic better. –  shem May 11 '12 at 12:40

I suggest the following :

public interface Animal {
    public String getTaxonomyClass(); 
    public void process();
}

Now each animal class implementing Animal should implement its own processing logic. For example :

public class Bird implements Animal {

    public Bird(float wingSpan) {
        this.wingSpan = wingSpan;
    }

    @Override
    public String getTaxonomyClass() {
        return "aves";
    }

    @Override
    public void process() {
         System.out.print("Wingspan is " + wingSpan);
    }

    // Specific to birds
    private float wingspan;
}

Now you can have only one AnimalProcessor which processes as follows :

 public void process(Animal a) {
      a.process();
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Using a generic name like process() is good assuming no Animal can have two different processes. For example, "Sea Bass" could "has scales" and a "Flying Fish" could "has scales" and "has a wingspan". If you want to know only about wingspans, you're stuck. –  Tony Ennis May 10 '12 at 13:29
    
but you want to separate the processing from the data object, so it's should be in other class. –  shem May 10 '12 at 13:31
    
maybe process is not the most fitting name but the idea that each animal type knows how to handle itself and access its own properties, otherwise casting cannot be avoided –  giorashc May 10 '12 at 13:32
1  
@giorashc, +1 I agree with you, I like this approach. I would have called it getDetails() instead, but that's just a nit-picky detail. This approach could be taken one step further, using a Template Design Pattern, but that would require changing the Animal interface to an Abstract Class. –  Brady May 10 '12 at 13:35
1  
process is confusing. getDetails as @Brady suggested might be more sutiable for the cause. The point is a specific animal should encapsulate its own specific properties within its own class otherwise you gonna find yourself doing alot of casting and ifs. –  giorashc May 10 '12 at 16:06

This is where generics work great.

First, you need to make AnimalProcessor generic:

public interface AnimalProcessor <T extends Animal> {
    public String getSupportedTaxonomyClass();
    public void process(T a);
}

Next, in your specific processors, you specify the generic type - eg for mammals:

public class MammalProcessor implements AnimalProcessor<Mammal> {

    public String getSupportedTaxonomyClass() {
        return "mammalia";
    }

    public void process(Mammal a) {
        System.out.println("Tooth count is " + a.getToothCount());
    }

}

Now, the process method only accepts Mammal objects, no birds here.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks like the answer - thank you! –  pjm56 May 10 '12 at 15:08
    
There is still something of a problem, when I reach this code: AnimalProcessor ap = registry.get(taxonomy); ap.process(critter); Then I get warnings because AnimalProcessor is a raw type. However, I cannot parameterise it because I don't know the sub-type of critter at this point. What is the right way to do this? –  pjm56 May 10 '12 at 15:32
    
You should change AnimalProcessor ap = registry.get(taxonomy); to AnimalProcessor<? extends Animal> ap = registry.get(taxonomy); –  Sorin May 10 '12 at 18:08
    
Unfortunately this does not work. In eclipse I get an error now... The method process(? extends Animal) in the type AnimalProcessor<? extends Animal> is not applicable for the arguments (Animal). –  pjm56 May 11 '12 at 10:36
1  
Indeed, you are right. I don't think my solution will work properly. –  Sorin May 11 '12 at 14:23

Make you AnimalProcessor generic;

public interface AnimalProcessor<T extends Animal> {
    public String getSupportedTaxonomyClass();
    public void process(T a);
}

public class MammalProcessor implements AnimalProcessor<Mammal> {

    @Override
    public String getSupportedTaxonomyClass() {
        return "mammalia";
    }

    @Override
    public void process(Mammal a) {
        System.out.println("Tooth count is " + a.getToothCount());
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Qwerky - several people have suggested this approach, and it almost works! Unfortunately I cannot figure out how to eliminate all errors and warnings from the ProcessNewAnimals method. The use of raw types produces warnings (a code smell) and then, when I try to parameterise, I always end up with type conflict error. Fundamentally this seems to be because we cannot rule out the possibility that registry will return an AnimalProcessor<Bird> when we are trying to pass in an Mammal. So have we gained nothing? –  pjm56 May 11 '12 at 11:08

So you've got a class like this...

public abstract class Bird implements Animal {

    @Override
    public String getTaxonomyClass() {
        return "aves";
    }

    // Specific to birds
    public abstract float getWingspan();

}

All Birds will have a wingspan, even if the wingspan is 0. So, why don't you change the class to something like this...

public class Bird implements Animal {

    float wingspan = 0.0f;

    public Bird(float wingspan){
        this.wingspan = wingspan;
    }

    @Override
    public String getTaxonomyClass() {
        return "aves";
    }

    // Specific to birds
    public float getWingspan(){
        return wingspan;
    }

}

So, to create a new Bird, instead of doing this...

    animals.add(new Bird() {  // condor

        @Override
        public float getWingspan() {
            return 2.9f;
        } }
    );

You would just do this...

animals.add(new Bird(2.9f)); // condor

This would seem to make the whole thing a lot simpler and nicer for your purposes. You would do a similar change for your Mammal class too.

Now, for the processing of animals... if all Animals are going to be processed, you could just implement process() in Bird rather than needing a separate BirdProcessor class. To do this, in Animal, declare a method public void process();. Your Bird would implement it like this...

public void process() {
     System.out.print("Wingspan is " + getWingspan());
}

and you would change your AnimalProcessor to simply do this (note: no longer an interface)...

public class AnimalProcessor {
    public void process(Animal a) {
        a.process();
    }
}

Your AnimalProcessor class would then be able to handle all Animals.

Alternatively, if you want to leave AnimalProcessor as it is, it would probably be good to change the following though, to avoid the ClassCastException (this code here is for the BirdProcessor)...

public void process(Animal a) {
    if (a instanceof Bird){
        System.out.print("Wingspan is " + ((Bird)a).getWingspan());
    }
}

Is this kinda what you were looking for?

share|improve this answer
    
The way @WATTO does his constructors is the best way IMO. –  Tony Ennis May 10 '12 at 13:31

Your problem are methods such as

   public abstract int getToothCount();

...aren't defined in Animal. Instead, they are defined in specific subclasses of Animal. This means you can't treat Animals generically since they are fundamentally different.

To overcome this, the one approach would be to create abstract methods for all these in the Animal class.

Bird might respond to getToothCount() with "0".

Since all animals could respond to getWingspan(), getTootCount(), etc, you would not have to perform any type-specific checking. If this isn't good enough, create abstract implementations of "boolean hasWings()", "boolean hasTeeth()" etc etc in Animal.

Now you could say, for some animal a:

if (a.hasWings()) System.out.println("My wingspan is "+a.getWingSpan());

which would work for any animal. Of course, each subclass of Animal would have to implement all the various methods.

Another option is to add non-abstract methods to Animal. These methods would supply default answers. For example, getWingSpan() would return 0, getToothCount() would return 0, etc. Shark would override getToothCount(). Eagle would override getWingSpan()...

Then your subclasses would only have to override (or even know about) methods related directly to them.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey downvoter, What's wrong with the answer? –  Tony Ennis May 10 '12 at 13:41
    
To me it doesnt seem very intuitive nor cohesive for a dog object to have the method getWingspan() available, or for a turtle to have getToothCount(), even though they return 0. I was considering answering myself, but it would have been a bit of a repeat of @giorashc. I would have put getDetails() in Animal, and implemented a Template Pattern in Mammal, Bird, Amphibian, etc, whereby they implement getDetails() and call an abstract method doGetDetails() implemented in the concrete classes. –  Brady May 10 '12 at 13:55
    
Then the 'put default methods into Animal' alternate would work better for you. A generic method such as getDetails() does not fulfill the requirement for implementing getToothCount(). Or being able to find a list of all animals with teeth, etc. This sort of thing is possible with the OP's solution, easily done with the solution I presented, and extremely ugly (at best) with the getDetails() solution. The getDetails() solution is a cop-out to me. It uses a word game to blur the fact that some animals are very different from others. –  Tony Ennis May 10 '12 at 14:05
    
that's a good point, but I didnt see any requirements for being able to get animals with teeth. Sounds a bit like feature creep. Im just imaging the API doc for such a class hierarchy and getWingspan() would be really odd in an Animal base class. I could imagine seeing methods like hasTeeth(), hasWings(), etc, but not getTeeth(). BTW, who is OP? –  Brady May 10 '12 at 14:19
    
OP = Original Poster. I supported the more explicit method names because the OP used those methods. There's no feature creep, though - the implementation I chose supports what the OP was doing. Since it doesn't smudge the facts, it more easily supports additional functionality. –  Tony Ennis May 10 '12 at 14:26

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