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I have a simple function written to check for directories:

:direxist
if not exist %~1 (
    echo %~1 could not be found, check to make sure your location is correct.
    goto:end
    ) else (
    echo %~1 is a real directory
    goto:eof
    )

:end is written as

:end
endlocal

I don't understand why the program would not stop after goto:end has been called. I have another function that uses the same method to stop the program and it work fine.

:PRINT_USAGE
echo Usage:
echo ------
echo <file usage information>
goto:end

In this instance, the program is stopped after calling :end; why would this not work in :direxist? Thank you for your help!

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possible duplicate of Exit batch script from inside a function –  Nathan Aug 14 at 18:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I suppose you are mixing call and goto statements here.

A label in a batch file can be used with a call or a goto, but the behaviour is different.
If you call such a function it will return when the function reached the end of the file or an explicit exit /b or goto :eof (like your goto :end).

Therefore you can't cancel your batch if you use a label as a function.

However, goto to a label, will not return to the caller.

But there is also a way to exit the batch from a function.
You can create a syntax error, this forces the batch to stop.

@echo off
call :label hello
call :label stop
echo Never returns
exit /b

:label
echo %1
if "%1"=="stop" goto :halt
exit /b

:halt
call :haltHelper 2> nul

:haltHelper
() 
exit /b
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2  
Besides the inability to return to a calling batch script, this solution also prevents implicit ENDLOCAL that is supposed to occur upon batch termination, resulting in unwanted lingering envinronment changes. –  dbenham Dec 13 '12 at 15:25
    
See stackoverflow.com/a/25474648/1012053 for a clean technique to exit batch processing from within a CALLed routine that properly terminates SETLOCAL. –  dbenham Aug 24 at 18:56

jeb's solution works great. But it may not be appropriate in all circumstances. It has 2 potential drawbacks:

1) The syntax error will halt all batch processing. So if a batch script called your script, and your script is halted with the syntax error, then control is not returned to the caller. That might be bad.

2) Normally there is an implicit ENDLOCAL for every SETLOCAL when batch processing terminates. But the fatal syntax error terminates batch processing without the implicit ENDLOCAL! This can have nasty consequences :-( See my DosTips post SETLOCAL continues after batch termination! for more information.

The other way to halt a batch file within a function is to use the EXIT command, which will exit the command shell entirely. But a little creative use of CMD can make it useful for solving the problem.

@echo off
if "%~1" equ "_GO_" goto :main
cmd /c ^""%~f0" _GO_ %*^"
exit /b

:main
call :label hello
call :label stop
echo Never returns
exit /b

:label
echo %1
if "%1"=="stop" exit
exit /b

I've got both my version named "daveExit.bat" and jeb's version named "jebExit.bat" on my PC.

I then test them using this batch script

@echo off
echo before calling %1
call %1
echo returned from %1

And here are the results

>test jebExit
before calling jebExit
hello
stop

>test daveExit
before calling daveExit
hello
stop
returned from daveExit

>

One potential disadvantage of the EXIT solution is that changes to the environment are not preserved. That can be partially solved by writing the environent to a temporary file before exiting, and then reading it back in.

@echo off
if "%~1" equ "_GO_" goto :main
cmd /c ^""%~f0" _GO_ %*^"
for /f "eol== delims=" %%A in (env.tmp) do set %%A
del env.tmp
exit /b

:main
call :label hello
set junk=saved
call :label stop
echo Never returns
exit /b

:label
echo %1
if "%1"=="stop" goto :saveEnvAndExit
exit /b

:saveEnvAndExit
set >env.tmp
exit

But variables with newline character (0x0A) in the value will not be preserved properly.

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+1, Also nice, and you have the advantage that temporary variables are removed –  jeb May 10 '12 at 20:36
    
@jeb - I was thinking that the loss of environment variable settings might be a disadvantage. But I see your point. There might be any number of temp variable settings prior to the exit condition that shouldn't be preserved. If there are any variables that must be preserved, they can be selectively written to a temp file and restored when CMD returns. –  dbenham May 11 '12 at 2:46

Here's my solution that will support nested routines if all are checked for errorlevel I add the test for errolevel at all my calls (internal or external)

@echo off
call :error message&if errorlevel 1 exit /b %errorlevel%<
@echo continuing
exit /b 0
:error
@echo in %0
@echo message: %1
set yes=
set /p yes=[no]^|yes to continue
if /i "%yes%" == "yes" exit /b 0
exit /b 1
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I learned something new from your post. The echo of the %0 is something I never new about (for a function). Thanks! –  djangofan May 31 '13 at 15:07

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