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I want to create an exact copy of a file(.bmp) in c

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    FILE *str,*cptr;

    if((str=fopen("org.bmp","rb"))==NULL)
    {
        fprintf(stderr,"Cannot read file\n");
        //return 1;
    }

    if((cptr=fopen("copy.bmp","wb"))==NULL)
    {
        fprintf(stderr,"Cannot open output file\n");
        //return 1;
    }

    fseek(str, 0, SEEK_END);
    long size=ftell(str);
    printf("Size of FILE : %.2f MB \n",(float)size/1024/1024);
    char b[2];

    for(int i=0;i<size;i++)
    {
        fread(b,1,1,str);
        fwrite(b,1,1,cptr);
    }

    fseek(cptr, 0, SEEK_END);
    long csize=ftell(str);
    printf("Size of created FILE : %.2f MB \n",(float)csize/1024/1024);
    fclose(str);
    fclose(cptr);

    return 0;
}

Although it creates a file of the same size but windows throws an error while trying to view the newly created copy of bitmap. Why is this happening?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have moved the file pointer for the input file to the end of the file before you start reading it. You need to restore it to the beginning.

Change:

fseek(str, 0, SEEK_END);
long size=ftell(str);

to:

fseek(str, 0, SEEK_BEGIN);
long size=ftell(str);
fseek(str, 0, SEEK_SET);

Note that your code is devoid of error checking - if you had at least checked the result of fread then your mistake would have been immediately apparent. Take-home message: don't cut corners when it comes to error-checking - it will pay dividends later.

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I general do error checking, i just got lazy there.Anyways thanks for the help. –  RAZER May 10 '12 at 13:57
    
How write the entire file by using a single call to fwrite other than looping through fread and fwrite ? –  RAZER May 10 '12 at 14:08
    
@RAZER: allocate a buffer that is the same size as the file. Or for larger files where this might be impractical, use a buffer of, say, 1024 chars, and read and write (up to) 1024 chars at a time. –  Paul R May 10 '12 at 14:13
    
It'll help if could give some examples. –  RAZER May 10 '12 at 14:18

You need to seek back to the start of the original file because you are continually reading at the EOF and therefore not making a copy of the file contents, just whatever happens to be in your b[] array.

You are not checking the return codes of fread() and fwrite(). If you had been doing that you might have solved this problem from the return codes.

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I am so stupid i forgot to rewind ,thanks for the answer. –  RAZER May 10 '12 at 13:54

If you check the size of the original file and the copy in bytes, it should tell you the issue.

This code reads a byte and writes a byte.

#include<stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

#define KB 1024

int main()
{
    unsigned int ifd,ofd,rcnt;
    char buf[KB];

    ifd=open("orig.jpg",O_RDONLY);
    if(ifd==0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr,"Cannot read file\n");
        //return 1;
    }

    ofd=open("copy.jpg",O_WRONLY|O_CREAT);
    if(ofd==0)
    {
        fprintf(stderr,"Cannot open output file\n");
        //return 1;
    }

    while(rcnt=read(ifd,buf,KB))
        write(ofd,buf,rcnt);
}

~

share|improve this answer
    
How write the entire file by using a single call to fwrite other than looping through fread and fwrite ? –  RAZER May 10 '12 at 14:14
    
Seems like with fread/fwrite one can't get actual bytes read/written. You can migrate to read/write, check my edited solution. Modify KB accordingly to have required buffer. –  tuxuday May 10 '12 at 14:39
    
To do in single shot you can get the file size using stat(), then allocating buffer as reqd. –  tuxuday May 10 '12 at 14:41

This is a nice function to copy files! Copy char by char is better than read the whole file because that result (if the file is to long) is a bufferoverflow!

double copy(char *input, char *output) {
    FILE *f_in = fopen(input, "r");
    FILE *f_out = fopen(output, "a");
    if (!f_in || !f_out) {
        fclose(f_in);
        fclose(f_out);
        return -1;
    }
    int c;
    while ((c = fgetc(f_in)) != EOF)
        fputc(c, f_out);
    fclose(f_in);
    fseek(f_out, 0, SEEK_END);
    long size = ftell(f_out);
    fclose(f_out);
    return (double)(size / 1024 / 1024); // MB
}

This function returns the MB of the output file. If it wasn't successfully it return 0.

Use this function like this:

double output;
if ((output = copy("What ever you want to copy", "Where ever it should be printed")) != -1)
    printf("Size of file: %lf MB.\n", output);

Hope this will help :)

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This will be very slow. Copying bigger numbers of bytes at once is usually much faster. –  FUZxxl May 10 '12 at 18:26

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