Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Following is my C code.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    int ch;

    do
    {
        printf("\n1.create\n2.display\n3.exit\n\t");
        printf("Enter your choice:: ");
        scanf("%d",&ch);
        printf("choice = %d\n\n", ch);
        if(ch==32767)
            return 0;
        switch(ch)
        {
            case 1:
                printf("\n Case 1 executed\n");
                break;
            case 2:
                printf("\nCase 2 executed\n");
                break;
            case 3:
                printf("\nExit\n");
                exit(0);
                break;
            default:
                printf("Wrong choice!!!");
                break;

        }
    }while(ch!=3);
    return 0;
}

Problem is that when I am inputting integer value for ch it is working fine. But when I am inputting any characters it is running in infinite loop.

Can any one solve it.

share|improve this question
4  
Run it through a debugger and then get back here if you don't understand what is happening. If you're on Linux, I'd recommend GDB... –  Fredrik Pihl May 10 '12 at 14:06
    
@Prabin Why do you want to input 'ch' as an integer type? Would you need that number later for some further processing? If no, then using int to parse not-strictly-integer input might not be the best solution. If you need the value for something other than switch-case, would inputing as a character/string be an option, and then extracting the integer value in case of a correct input? In any case, I strongly recommend not using only int type for input in case of possible non-numerical input. –  penelope May 11 '12 at 8:59

2 Answers 2

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Use scanf ("%*[^\n]\n");

Here you have used scanf("%d",&ch); which will read integer value correctly but as soon as you will give any value other then integer it will terminate or show different output. Why this is happening ? @It's happning because each time you entered some value either valid or invalid first it place in input buffer reader after that value read from there..

For further Info regarding scanf : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scanf_format_string

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    int ch;

    do
    {
        printf("\n1.create\n2.display\n3.exit\n\t");
        printf("Enter your choice:: ");

        scanf ("%*[^\n]\n");
        scanf("%d",&ch);
        switch(ch)
        {
            case 1:
                printf("\n Case 1 executed\n");
                break;
            case 2:
                printf("\nCase 2 executed\n");
                break;
            case 3:
                printf("\nExit\n");
                exit(0);
                break;
            default:
                printf("Wrong choice!!!");
                break;

        }
    }while(ch!=3);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Nishant, Thanks for posting the answer. I found a problem after running this code. When it is asking for input and, I am inserting a character it is showing blank. Again if I enter a character it is working fine. Can you fix it. –  Prabin May 11 '12 at 5:54
    
This code is not working. Example: try typing in 'j1E' 'jE' '1E' 'jE' where 'E' stands for the enter key. What happens after each enter: nothing, wrong_choice, case_1, case_1 . I don't think that is a desired behavior. Am I wrong? –  penelope May 11 '12 at 7:30

You should be using a char value instead of an int if you want to be able to handle characters.

In that case, you also have to modify your switch-case statement, because '1' - a character, is different than 1 - an integer number. Corrected code should be something like:

#include <limits.h>

int main()
{
    char ch;

    do
    {
        printf("\n1.create\n2.display\n3.exit\n\t");
        printf("Enter your choice:: ");
        scanf("%c",&ch);
        printf("choice = %c\n\n", ch);
        switch(ch)
        {
            case '1':
                printf("\n Case 1 executed\n");
                break;
            case '2':
                printf("\nCase 2 executed\n");
                break;
            // case 32767: - can not be stored in a char variable
            case 127:
            case CHAR_MAX: // these two are almost equivalent, but the
                           // second one is better because it relies on
                           // library defined constant from limits.h
            case '3':
                printf("\nExit\n");
                exit(0);
                break;
            case 'a':
                printf("\nA character case accepted!\n");
                break;
            default:
                printf("Wrong choice!!!");
                break;

        }
    }while();
    return 0;
}

Note that I also excluded the break condition from as the while() argument, because it is redundant - it will already be checked inside the switch statement.

I also added a non-error case of parsing a character so that you can see an example of that.

One other note: Your old code should accept both 01 and 1 as a valid choice, while the new code will parse 01 as two different choices (1 choice == 1 character):

  • 0 will be parsed as a wrong choice
  • 1 will be parsed as a correct choice for case 1

I have also commented on some other things from your code in the code comments in the corrected code snippets. I took out the "impossible" if (as Jerry Coffin pointed out in the comments), and put it in a more appropriate place, replacing the constant in to something meaningful.

share|improve this answer
    
now you spoiled all the fun :-) –  Fredrik Pihl May 10 '12 at 14:09
    
At least on most systems (where CHAR_MAX = 127 or 255) the comparison to 32767 can't possibly be true. –  Jerry Coffin May 10 '12 at 14:11
    
@Fredrik That's true, I usually don't answer this kind of questions with code-replies... Just felt especially nice today :) –  penelope May 10 '12 at 14:19
    
Nothing wrong with being nice :-) Good post –  Fredrik Pihl May 10 '12 at 21:07
    
Hi penelope, According to your answer I should declare ch as character type. But I want it to be of integer.Can you say how to free the memory location used by scanf. I think if we can free the memory used by scanf then the problem is solved. –  Prabin May 11 '12 at 6:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.