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How can you enumerate a enum in C#?

e.g. the following does not compile:

public enum Suit
{
    Spades,
    Hearts,
    Clubs,
    Diamonds
}

public void EnumerateAllSuitsDemoMethod()
{
    foreach (Suit suit in Suit)
    {
        DoSomething(suit);
    }
}

It gives the compile time error:

'Suit' is a 'type' but is used like a 'variable'

It fails on the Suit keyword, the 2nd one.

share|improve this question
6  
See also ... stackoverflow.com/questions/972307/… –  SteveC Aug 4 '09 at 14:10
4  
It might be easiest just to use Enum.GetValues(typeof(Suit)).Cast<Suit>(). That will give you an IEnumerable<Suit>. –  sircodesalot Mar 17 '13 at 4:16
    
Use the DescriptionAttribute on enum values msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… (example code: codeproject.com/Articles/13821/…) to iterate trough user friendly descriptions of the enum's value. –  Mike de Klerk Aug 21 '13 at 11:40
1  
You may want to check out The ins and outs of C# enums, which discusses this as well as other useful enum tidbits –  ChaseMedallion Jul 20 at 20:00

21 Answers 21

up vote 1872 down vote accepted
foreach (Suit suit in (Suit[]) Enum.GetValues(typeof(Suit)))
{
}
share|improve this answer
9  
This doesn't work if you have duplicate values in the enumerator list. –  Jessy Jun 17 '12 at 3:50
    
@Jessy if you need all the names (including the ones with duplicate values), maybe try Enum.GetNames in conjunction with Enum.Parse. It's going to be a little slow though, I recommend doing it once during initialization (or the first time it's needed) and caching the results into an array. –  BrainSlugs83 Aug 13 '13 at 2:05
1  
I just want to point out that this, unfortunately won't work in silverlight, since the silverlight library don't comprise enum.GetValues. You have to use reflection in this case. –  Giacomo Tagliabue Oct 17 '13 at 5:50
5  
@Jessy this does work in case of duplicate situations like enum E {A = 0, B = 0}. Enum.GetValues results in two values being returned, though they are the same. E.A == E.B is true, so there is not distinction. If you want individual names, then you should look for Enum.GetNames. –  nawfal Nov 7 '13 at 9:25
1  
Then if you have duplicates/synonyms in your enum, and you want the other behavior, you can use Linq's Distinct extension (since .NET 3.5), so foreach (var suit in ((Suit[])Enum.GetValues(typeof(Suit))).Distinct()) { }. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jun 12 at 8:46

It looks to me like you really want to print out the names of each enum, rather than the values. In which case Enum.GetNames() seems to be the right approach.

public enum Suits
{
    Spades,
    Hearts,
    Clubs,
    Diamonds,
    NumSuits
}

public void PrintAllSuits()
{
    foreach (string name in Enum.GetNames(typeof(Suits)))
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine(name);
    }
}

By the way, incrementing the value is not a good way to enumerate the values of an enum. You should do this instead.

I would use Enum.GetValues(typeof(Suit)) instead.

public enum Suits
{
    Spades,
    Hearts,
    Clubs,
    Diamonds,
    NumSuits
}

public void PrintAllSuits()
{
    foreach (var suit in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Suits)))
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine(suit.ToString());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
16  
var is a new keyword in C# 3.0 (.NET 3.5) that says I don't feel like typing out the type of this variable (or don't know it), I want the compiler to infer it for me. You can only use it with assignment in the same statement as the declaration. –  Mike Brown Oct 21 '08 at 23:26
16  
@Mike Brown: Hmmm, unknown variable types. Sounds like we're going back to the dark days of typeless and variant languages. shiver –  Ian Boyd Jun 1 '10 at 17:45
29  
The variable is still typed in the same way as other variables. It's just that you allow the compiler to infer the type from the RHS of the assignment (it can only be used with assignments, you can't just do var foo;). This is particularly important with LINQ, as the returned types can be quite complex, and not easy to work out yourself. –  Matt Sach Jun 3 '10 at 14:36
4  
@Matt Sach: It's fine as long as the type inferred by the compiler is the type i inferred when i wrote it. –  Ian Boyd Oct 1 '10 at 21:31
3  
@IanBoyd: Graphain is right, in C#, var is what you need when you may get different types from different queries. but if what you are shivering about is called dynamic typing, then I don't get your point. –  Luka Ramishvili Nov 11 '11 at 7:02

I made some extensions for easy enum usage, maybe someone can use it...

public static class EnumExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Gets all items for an enum value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="value">The value.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static IEnumerable<T> GetAllItems<T>(this Enum value)
    {
        foreach (object item in Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)))
        {
            yield return (T)item;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets all items for an enum type.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="value">The value.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static IEnumerable<T> GetAllItems<T>() where T : struct
    {
        foreach (object item in Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)))
        {
            yield return (T)item;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets all combined items from an enum value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="value">The value.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    /// <example>
    /// Displays ValueA and ValueB.
    /// <code>
    /// EnumExample dummy = EnumExample.Combi;
    /// foreach (var item in dummy.GetAllSelectedItems<EnumExample>())
    /// {
    ///    Console.WriteLine(item);
    /// }
    /// </code>
    /// </example>
    public static IEnumerable<T> GetAllSelectedItems<T>(this Enum value)
    {
        int valueAsInt = Convert.ToInt32(value, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);

        foreach (object item in Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)))
        {
            int itemAsInt = Convert.ToInt32(item, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);

            if (itemAsInt == (valueAsInt & itemAsInt))
            {
                yield return (T)item;
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines whether the enum value contains a specific value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="value">The value.</param>
    /// <param name="request">The request.</param>
    /// <returns>
    ///     <c>true</c> if value contains the specified value; otherwise, <c>false</c>.
    /// </returns>
    /// <example>
    /// <code>
    /// EnumExample dummy = EnumExample.Combi;
    /// if (dummy.Contains<EnumExample>(EnumExample.ValueA))
    /// {
    ///     Console.WriteLine("dummy contains EnumExample.ValueA");
    /// }
    /// </code>
    /// </example>
    public static bool Contains<T>(this Enum value, T request)
    {
        int valueAsInt = Convert.ToInt32(value, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
        int requestAsInt = Convert.ToInt32(request, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);

        if (requestAsInt == (valueAsInt & requestAsInt))
        {
            return true;
        }

        return false;
    }
}

The enum itself must be decorated with the FlagsAttribute

[Flags]
public enum EnumExample
{
    ValueA = 1,
    ValueB = 2,
    ValueC = 4,
    ValueD = 8,
    Combi = ValueA | ValueB
}
share|improve this answer
1  
how to use these extensions ? –  Khalil Dahab Jun 13 '10 at 23:47
5  
A one liner for the first extension method; it's no more lazy. return Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)).Cast<T>(); –  Leyu Jun 22 '10 at 9:29
2  
+1 for providing a full set of extensions :) –  Guillermo Gutiérrez Nov 21 '12 at 21:30
2  
Maybe someone could show how to use these extensions? The compiler do not show extension methods on enum EnumExample. –  Tomas Feb 12 '13 at 8:01
1  
+1 for reusable code: examples - save these extension methods in a library and reference it [Flags]public enum mytypes{name1, name2 }; List<string> myTypeNames = mytypes.GetAllItems(); –  Krishna Oct 22 '13 at 6:55

The .NET compact framework does not support Enum.GetValues. Here's a good workaround from Ideas 2.0: Enum.GetValues in Compact Framework:

public IEnumerable<Enum> GetValues(Enum enumeration)
{
   List<Enum> enumerations = new List<Enum>();
   foreach (FieldInfo fieldInfo in enumeration.GetType().GetFields(
         BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.Public))
   {
      enumerations.Add((Enum)fieldInfo.GetValue(enumeration));
   }
   return enumerations;
}
share|improve this answer
8  
Why not use the yield keyword here instead instantiating a list? –  Eric Mickelsen Jan 16 '11 at 22:18
    
The code I work with doesn't work well with yield return. If I was sure it worked I'd use yield return. –  Ekevoo Feb 14 '11 at 23:11
    
Also, yield return also instantiates an object, so there's no real benefit unless your enums have thousands of possible values. –  Ekevoo Mar 20 '12 at 15:58
    
or shorter: return type.GetFields().Where(x => x.IsLiteral).Select(x => x.GetValue(null)).Cast<Enum>(); –  nawfal Nov 7 '13 at 9:21
1  
@nawfal: Linq isn't available .Net CF 2.0. –  Gabriel GM May 23 at 15:16

I think this is more efficient than other suggestions because GetValues() is not called each time you have a loop. It is also more concise. And you get a compile-time error not a runtime exception if Suit is not an enum.

EnumLoop<Suit>.ForEach((suit) => {
    DoSomethingWith(suit);
});

EnumLoop has this completely generic definition:

class EnumLoop<Key> where Key : struct, IConvertible {
    static readonly Key[] arr = (Key[])Enum.GetValues(typeof(Key));
    static internal void ForEach(Action<Key> act) {
        for (int i = 0; i < arr.Length; i++) {
            act(arr[i]);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for novel use of generics and linq queries. Although i would smack anyone who used it in practice. –  Ian Boyd Feb 2 '12 at 19:02
2  
Ian, thanks for the +1. I am new to C# and I am keen explore and learn best practice. I do use it in practice; why I deserve a smack? –  James Feb 3 '12 at 11:46
4  
Careful with using generics like this. If you try to use EnumLoop with some type that is not an enum, it will compile fine, but throw an exception at runtime. –  svick Feb 6 '12 at 12:09
4  
Thank you svick. Runtime exceptions will actually occur with the other answers on this page... except this one because I have added "where Key : struct, IConvertible" so that you get a compile time error in most cases. –  James Feb 7 '12 at 12:13
2  
No, GetValues() is called only once in the foreach. –  Alex Blokha Jul 30 '12 at 11:25

You won't get Enum.GetValues() in Silverlight.

Original Blog Post by Einar Ingebrigtsen:

public class EnumHelper
{
    public static T[] GetValues<T>()
    {
        Type enumType = typeof(T);

        if (!enumType.IsEnum)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Type '" + enumType.Name + "' is not an enum");
        }

        List<T> values = new List<T>();

        var fields = from field in enumType.GetFields()
                     where field.IsLiteral
                     select field;

        foreach (FieldInfo field in fields)
        {
            object value = field.GetValue(enumType);
            values.Add((T)value);
        }

        return values.ToArray();
    }

    public static object[] GetValues(Type enumType)
    {
        if (!enumType.IsEnum)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Type '" + enumType.Name + "' is not an enum");
        }

        List<object> values = new List<object>();

        var fields = from field in enumType.GetFields()
                     where field.IsLiteral
                     select field;

        foreach (FieldInfo field in fields)
        {
            object value = field.GetValue(enumType);
            values.Add(value);
        }

        return values.ToArray();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice solution, but some refactoring will be better! :) –  nawfal Nov 7 '13 at 9:10

Just to add my solution, which works in compact framework (3.5) and supports type checking at compile time:

public static List<T> GetEnumValues<T>() where T : new() {
    T valueType = new T();
    return typeof(T).GetFields()
        .Select(fieldInfo => (T)fieldInfo.GetValue(valueType))
        .Distinct()
        .ToList();
}

public static List<String> GetEnumNames<T>() {
    return typeof (T).GetFields()
        .Select(info => info.Name)
        .Distinct()
        .ToList();
}

- If anyone knows how to get rid of the T valueType = new T(), I'd be happy to see a solution.

A call would look like this:

List<MyEnum> result = Utils.GetEnumValues<MyEnum>();
share|improve this answer
2  
what about using T valueType = default(T)? –  Oliver Jul 7 '10 at 14:17
    
Great, I didn't even know that keyword. Always nice to learn something new. Thank you! Does it always return a reference to the same object, or does it create a new instance each time the default statement is called? I haven't found anything on the net about this so far, but if it creates a new instance every time, it kind of defeats the purpose I was looking for (having a one-liner ^^). –  Mallox Jul 8 '10 at 6:48
    
.GetValue(new T())? –  Jason Miesionczek Jun 21 '11 at 2:33
1  
Wouldn't this create a new instance for every iteration over the enumeration? –  Mallox Jun 28 '11 at 15:04
    
-1 for "supports type checking at compile time:". What type checking? This would work for any new() T. Also, you dont need new T() at all, you can select just the static fields alone and do .GetValue(null). See Aubrey's answer. –  nawfal Jan 30 at 4:47
public void PrintAllSuits()
	{
		foreach(string suit in Enum.GetNames(typeof(Suits)))
		{
			Console.WriteLine(suit);
		}
	}
share|improve this answer
1  
That enumerates a string, don't forget to convert those things back to an enumeration value so the enumeration can be enumerated. –  Ian Boyd Jun 1 '10 at 17:46
    
I see from your edit that you want to actually operate on the enums themselves, the above code addressed your original post. –  Joshua Drake Jun 4 '10 at 15:22

I think you can use

Enum.GetNames(Suit)
share|improve this answer
1  
Enum.GetValues(Suits) –  Ian Boyd Sep 22 '08 at 14:43
> foreach (Suit suit in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Suit))) { }

I've heard vague rumours that this is terifically slow. Anyone know? – Orion Edwards Oct 15 '08 at 1:31 7

I think caching the array would speed it up considerably. It looks like you're getting a new array (through reflection) every time. Rather:

Array ar = Enum.GetValues(typeof(Suit));
foreach(Suit temp_suit in ar) Do_Something(temp_suit);

That's at least a little faster, ja?

share|improve this answer

Why is no one using Cast<T>?

var suits = Enum.GetValues(typeof(Suit)).Cast<Suit>();

There you go IEnumerable<Suit>.

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What the hell I'll throw my two pence in, just by combining the top answers I through together a very simple extension

public static class EnumExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Gets all items for an enum value.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="value">The value.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static IEnumerable<T> GetAllItems<T>(this Enum value)
    {
        return (T[])Enum.GetValues(typeof (T));
    }
}

Clean simple and by @Jeppe-Stig-Nielsen s comment fast.

share|improve this answer

I use ToString() then split and parse the spit array in flags.

[Flags]
public enum ABC {
 a = 1,
 b = 2,
 c = 4
};

public IEnumerable<ABC> Getselected (ABC flags)
{

 var values = value.ToString().Split(',');
 var enums = values.Select(x => (ABC)Enum.Parse(typeof(ABC), x.Trim()));
 return enums;


}

ABC temp= ABC.a | ABC.b;
var list = getSelected ( temp );
foreach (var item in list)
{
  Console.WriteLine(item.ToString() + " ID=" + (int)item);
}
share|improve this answer

I do not hold the opinion this is better, or even good, just stating yet another solution.

If enum values range strictly from 0 to n - 1, a generic alternative:

public void EnumerateEnum<T>()
{
    int length = Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)).Length;
    for (var i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
        var @enum = (T)(object)i;
    }
}

If enum values are contiguous and you can provide the first and last element of the enum, then:

public void EnumerateEnum()
{
    for (var i = Suit.Spade; i <= Suit.Diamond; i++)
    {
        var @enum = i;
    }
}

but that's not strictly enumerating, just looping. The second method is much faster than any other approach though...

share|improve this answer

Three ways:

1. Enum.GetValues(type) //since .NET 1.1, not in silverlight or compact framewok
2. type.GetEnumValues() //only on .NET 4 and above
3. type.GetFields().Where(x => x.IsLiteral).Select(x => x.GetValue(null)) //works everywhere

Not sure why was GetEnumValues introduced on type instance, it isn't very readable at all for me.


Having a helper class like Enum<T> is what is most readable and memorable for me:

public static class Enum<T> where T : struct, IComparable, IFormattable, IConvertible
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> GetValues()
    {
        return (T[])Enum.GetValues(typeof(T));
    }

    public static IEnumerable<string> GetNames()
    {
        return Enum.GetNames(typeof(T));
    }
}

Now you call:

Enum<Suit>.GetValues();
//or
Enum.GetValues(typeof(Suit)); //pretty consistent style

One can also use sort of caching if performance matters, but I dont expect this to be an issue at all

public static class Enum<T> where T : struct, IComparable, IFormattable, IConvertible
{
    //lazily loaded
    static T[] values;
    static string[] names;

    public static IEnumerable<T> GetValues()
    {
        return values ?? (values = (T[])Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)));
    }

    public static IEnumerable<string> GetNames()
    {
        return names ?? (names = Enum.GetNames(typeof(T)));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

here is a working example of creating select options for a DDL

var resman = ViewModelResources.TimeFrame.ResourceManager;
ViewBag.TimeFrames = from MapOverlayTimeFrames timeFrame in Enum.GetValues(typeof (MapOverlayTimeFrames))
                        select new SelectListItem
                            {
                                Value = timeFrame.ToString(),
                                Text = resman.GetString(timeFrame.ToString()) ?? timeFrame.ToString()
                            };
share|improve this answer

If you need speed and type checking at build and run time, this helper method is better than using Linq to cast each element

        public static T[] GetEnumValues<T>() where T : struct, IComparable, IFormattable, IConvertible
    {
        if (typeof(T).BaseType != typeof(Enum))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("{0} is not of type System.Enum", typeof(T)));
        }
        return Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)) as T[];
    }

and you can use it like below:

static readonly YourEnum[] _values = GetEnumValues<YourEnum>();

of course you can return IEnumerable<T>, but that buys you nothing here

share|improve this answer

The GetValues method is a static member of the Enum class. The method requires a single parameter holding the type of the enumeration to be processed. The GetValues method returns an array that contains a value for each member of the enumType enumeration.

public enum Suit
{
    Spades,
    Hearts,
    Clubs,
    Diamonds
}

foreach (Suit  s in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Suit)))
{
    DoSomething(s);
}

More about ... C# Enum

Zene

share|improve this answer
foreach (Suit suit in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Suit)))
{
}

(the current accepted answer has a cast that I don't think is needed (although I may be wrong)

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I know it is a bit messy but if you are fan of one-liners, here is one:

((Suit[])Enum.GetValues(typeof(Suit))).OfType<Suit>().ToList().ForEach(i => DoSomething(i));
share|improve this answer

A simple and generic way to convert a enum to something you can interact:

public static Dictionary<int, string> ToList<T>() where T : struct
{
   return ((IEnumerable<T>)Enum.GetValues(typeof(T))).ToDictionary(item => Convert.ToInt32(item), item => item.ToString());
}

and then:

var enums = EnumHelper.ToList<MyEnum>();
share|improve this answer

protected by ken2k May 1 '13 at 11:29

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