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my main purpose is to get this kind of a output: which shows the value and the number of times it appears in a array. Below is an example, but during the code, i will ask the user for input of data integers into an array

e.g. for the array: {-12, 3, -12, 4, 1, 1, -12, 1, -1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 2, 3, -12} The output should be:

 N  Count
 4  2
 3  3
 2  2
 1  4
-1  1
-12 4

below here is my own attempt, but for some reason i could not get the array to be stored, and used at other parts of the code:

import java.util.*;
public class Q4 
{    
    /**
     * @param args
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        int[] myarray = new int[50];

        System.out.println("Enter integers into the system, to quit enter -99");
        Scanner scan=new Scanner(System.in);

        for(int i = 0; i<myarray.length; i++)
        {
            int temp =scan.nextInt();
            if(temp!=(-99))
            {   
                myarray[i]=temp;
            }
            if(temp ==(-99))
            {
                System.out.println("Successfully terminated by inputting -99");
                System.out.println();
                break;
            }
            else if(i==(myarray.length-1))
            {
                System.out.println("successfully filled up array fully");
                System.out.println();
            }   
        }

        for(int i = 0; i<myarray.length; i++)
        {
            System.out.print(myarray[i]+",");
        }
        System.out.print("}");

        int temp=0;
        int number = 0;

        Arrays.sort(myarray);
        System.out.println("Array list: {");
        for (int i = 0; i < myarray.length; i++)
        {
            if(temp==0)
            {
                temp=myarray[i];
                number++;
            }
            else if (temp!=0)
            {
                if (temp==myarray[i])
                {
                    number++;
                }
                else
                {
                    temp=0;
                }
            }
        }
        System.out.print("}");  
        System.out.println();   
        System.out.println();   
        System.out.println("N"+"\t"+"\t"+"Count");
        System.out.println(temp+"\t"+"\t"+number);      
    }
}

here is My output, which isnt what i wanted,

Enter integers into the system, to quit enter -99
12
3123
3123
11
22
-99
Successfully terminated by inputting -99

Array list: {12,3123,3123,11,22,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,}Array list: {
}

N       Count
3123        48
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2  
If you are going to use a fixed size array you need to keep track of how many elements are actually in it. As far as the N - Count result, you didn't post the code that calculates / shows this, so we really can't speculate –  ControlAltDel May 10 '12 at 15:52
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4 Answers

up vote -1 down vote accepted

If this isn't a lesson how to use Arrays, I strongly advocate in making contact with List, and other collections - but preferably List, and concretely ArrayList. It is so convenient! And it is easy.

There are 3 or 4 basic operations: Constructor to define a List, add elements, remove elements, iterate over all elements.

And about 50 other not so frequently used methods, and methods which use Lists and so on.

public static void main (String [] args)
{
    List <Integer> myarray = new ArrayList <Integer> ();
    System.out.println ("Enter integers into the system, to quit enter -99");
    Scanner scan = new Scanner (System.in);

    while (scan.hasNextInt ())
    {
        int temp = scan.nextInt ();
        if (temp == -99)
        {
            System.out.println ("Successfully terminated by inputting -99");
            System.out.println ();
            break;
        }
        else {
            myarray.add (temp);
            if (myarray.size () == 50)
            {
                System.out.println ("successfully filled array fully up");
                System.out.println ();
            }
        }
    }
    for (int i : myarray)
    {
        System.out.print (i + ",");
    }
    System.out.print ("}");

    Set <Integer> hsi = new HashSet <Integer> (); 
    hsi.addAll (myarray);

    Collections.sort (myarray);
    System.out.println ("Array list: {");
    int idx = 0;
    for (int i: hsi) {
        System.out.println (i + "\t" + Collections.frequency (myarray, i));
    }
    System.out.println (myarray.size ());
}

See how short and simple? Just add the elements - you don't need to know in advance how many elements it contains. No marker-fields or external values to mark the end necessary!

Usage:

java Numbers
Enter integers into the system, to quit enter -99
4 44 0 33 2 2 7 9 1  4 3 90 -99 
Successfully terminated by inputting -99

4,44,0,33,2,2,7,9,1,4,3,90,}Array list: {
0   1
1   1
2   2
3   1
33  1
4   2
7   1
9   1
44  1
90  1
12

Your first idea for collecting values, you like to get by index or you want to iterate over, should be ArrayList, not a plain old array. Array is only useful in exceptional cases - when you surely know the size in advance to begin with.

ArrayLists are fast, believe it - no - don't believe it, test it!

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You increment number to attempt to count how many times the current array[i] has been seen, yet you never reset it's value to 0.

Also, at the end of your method, you are only printing a single row of the N Count table. If you want to print one row for each unique element of the index, don't you need to print more than one row?

There's an easier way to count the occurrences of elements in an array that doesn't require sorting it - hint, considering using a Map<Integer, Integer>.

share|improve this answer
    
If he's creating his own array I don't think he knows about List, ArrayList or any other collections (look at the homework tag) –  Luiggi Mendoza May 10 '12 at 15:54
    
@Luiggi, probably, but it never hurts to be told about easier ways to do something that lies outside of your current sphere of knowledge. That suggestion can be ignored. –  matt b May 10 '12 at 15:55
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You should try following thing.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Enumeration;
import java.util.Hashtable;
import java.util.Scanner;

public class NumberRepetion {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int[] myarray = new int[50];

        System.out.println("Enter integers into the system, to quit enter -99");
        Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);

        ArrayList<Integer> myarrList = new ArrayList<Integer>();

        while (scan.hasNext()) {

            int temp = scan.nextInt();
            if (temp != (-99)) {

                // myarray[i] = temp;
                myarrList.add(temp);
            }
            if (temp == (-99)) {
                System.out.println("Successfully terminated by inputting -99");
                System.out.println();
                break;
            }

        }

        Hashtable<Integer, Integer> result = new Hashtable<Integer, Integer>();

        System.out.print("Input Values  {");

        int currIndex = 0 ;
        for (Integer val : myarrList) {
            if (currIndex == ( myarrList.size() - 1 )){
                System.out.print(val);
            }else{
                System.out.print(val + ", ");
            }
            currIndex++ ;
            int currVal = val;
            Integer integer = result.get(currVal);
            if (integer == null || integer == 0) {
                result.put(currVal, 1);
            } else {
                result.put(currVal, ++integer);
            }
        }
        System.out.print("}");
        System.out.println()

        Enumeration<Integer> keys = result.keys();
        System.out.println("N\t\tCount");

        while(keys.hasMoreElements()){
            System.out.println(" " +  keys.nextElement() +"\t\t" + result.get(keys.nextElement()));
        }

        //System.out.println("\n\n\n Result  " + result);

    }

}

OUTPUT

Enter integers into the system, to quit enter -99
5
6
5
8
4
-99
Successfully terminated by inputting -99

Input Values    {5, 6, 5, 8, 4}
N       Count
 8      1
 5      1
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What I would do is to make a new node class that has two instances, the value and count. Every time you encounter a new number, make a new node with the its value, and increment its count by one. Have a List of the nodes and add the node to this list. For the next input, have a loop check if the value has already been seen before, eg.

for i = 0; i <list.size; i++
     if list.get(i).data == value // if it finds the value increment and break
            list.get(i).count++
            break;
     else if i==list.size-1//if it went through the list and didn't find the value, make a new node of the value and add it to the list
            make a new node
            add it to the list

After it has terminated, sort the list by comparing list.get(i).values and swapping (bubble sort comes to mind but there are many ways to sort)

After that just print the values and it's count

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