Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I coded a .NET C# windows service that runs on our server for a very long time (several months).

Yesterday i checked and i found out it uses 600MB of memory. I Restarted the service and now it uses 60MB ram.

I've started to check why it is using so much memory. Will the following function cause a memory leak?

I think its missing .Close() for StreamReader.

As a test , I've run the following function in a loop for 1000 times and i didn't see the memory going up.

private static string GetTemplate(string queryparams)
{
    WebRequest request = HttpWebRequest.Create(uri);
    request.Method = WebRequestMethods.Http.Get;
    WebResponse response = request.GetResponse();
    StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream());
    string tmp = reader.ReadToEnd();
    response.Close();
}
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code does not produce memory leak.

The code is not ideal as everyone points out (will cause closing resources later than you expect), but they will be released when GC get around to run and finalize unused objects.

Are you sure you see memory leak OR you just assume you have one based on some semi-random value? CLR may not free memory used by managed heap even if no objects are allocated, GC may not need to run if you don't have enough memory pressure (especially in x64).

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure at all about the memory leak , i just see the service in the Task Manager using 600mb of ram (i have just 4gb total) and it doesn't really make sense to me. –  RuSh May 10 '12 at 16:18
    
Fix you code anyway :). To confirm if it is a leak - better to use memory profiler for .Net (search - plenty of info), but you can cheat by adding call to GC.Collect often enough for investigation and see if memory usage growth all the time or just stabilizes at some value. Make sure you know how to reproduce the condition - otherwise how would you know if behavior changes. –  Alexei Levenkov May 10 '12 at 16:25
    
Alexei, is there something special about StreamReader, etc that can doesn't cause a memory leak without disposal? If the app exits, sure, the entire process will get killed along with whatever resources were allocated. But, in a service that runs for indefintely long periods of time this can be a real concern. Am I missing something? –  David Lively May 10 '12 at 21:30
    
No CLR objects leak memory if not disposed (bugs not count). All CLR classes that manage native resources (like FileStream) have both Dispose and finializer, so in case you failed to dispose the object it will eventually be garbage collected and release non-manged resource anyway. For pure managed objects (like most XXXXReader classes) there is no native portion and they don't even have finializers. In either case GC eventually will happen and memory will be marked as free. (Consider reading something on how GC and IDisposable work together... ) –  Alexei Levenkov May 10 '12 at 21:46

Your code is closing the response, but not the reader.

var tmp = string.Empty;

using(var reader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream())
{
    tmp = reader.ReadToEnd();  
}

/// do whatever with tmp that you want here...
share|improve this answer

All objects that implement IDisposable such as WebResponse and StreamReader should be disposed.

private static string GetTemplate(string queryparams)
{
    WebRequest request = HttpWebRequest.Create(uri);
    request.Method = WebRequestMethods.Http.Get;
    using(var response = request.GetResponse())
    using(var reader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream())
       string tmp = reader.ReadToEnd();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Stream also implements IDisposable. –  spender May 10 '12 at 16:00
    
@spender Disposing the StreamReader will close (and dispose) the underlying stream. –  Magnus May 10 '12 at 16:03
1  
Agreed. However, generally I include it too in case I decide later to move to another reading implementation where disposal is not implicit. –  spender May 10 '12 at 16:07

I would suggest a lot more than 1000 iterations if you want to see if the memory would increase. Each iteration would only take up a small bit of memory, if it is your memory leak.

I'm not sure if that is the source of your memory leak, but its good practice to .Close() your StreamReaders when you're done with them.

share|improve this answer

With StreamReader it's good practice to use 'using' then the IDisposable interface is implemented when the object is no longer in scope.

using (var reader = new StreamReader(FilePath))
  {
    string tmp = reader.ReadToEnd();
  }

As for your issue 1000 times is not very many recursions. Try leaving the app for a couple of hours and clock up a few 100 thousand and this will give you a better indication.

share|improve this answer

It could, potentially, depends how frequently you use it, cause you don't use esplicit call to Dispose() of Reader. To be sure that you did whatever you can in these lines, write them down like :

private static string GetTemplate(string queryparams)
{
    WebRequest request = HttpWebRequest.Create(uri);
    request.Method = WebRequestMethods.Http.Get;
    WebResponse response = request.GetResponse();

    using(StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream())){

         string tmp = reader.ReadToEnd();
         response.Close();
    }

    // here will be called Dispose() of the reader 
    // automatically whenever there is an exception or not.
}
share|improve this answer
    
How about the ResponseStream and the Response? Both implement IDisposable and should be disposed. As such, your code is missing 2 using statements. –  spender May 10 '12 at 15:59
    
i understand im missing a close on the reader :) . the big question is , can this cause a 600mb ram usage? –  RuSh May 10 '12 at 16:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.