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Very basic question. How do I do modify Linq results?

To expound further, I selected an order list from an order table in the database. I need to display the results in a gridview on a web form. First, I need to modify some of the results. For instance, the "Quote" field should be changed to blank when the "Order" field has a value. It is likely I might have to do more elaborate manipulation of the results. In the past, it was possible to loop through arrays, and modify them, but today's programming seems to not want loops happen. At the moment the results seem to be read-only, as if I am doing something wrong by needing to modify the list.

protected void fillGridView()
{
    using (CqsDataDataContext cqsDC = new CqsDataDataContext())
    {
        var orderlist = from x in cqsDC.MasterQuoteRecs
                        where x.CustomerNumber == accountNumber && x.DateCreated > DateTime.Now.AddDays(howfar)
                        orderby x.DateCreated descending
                        select new
                        {
                            customer = x.customername,
                            order = x.OrderReserveNumber,
                            quote = x.Quote,
                            date = Convert.ToDateTime(x.DateCreated).ToShortDateString(),
                            project = x.ProjectName,
                            total = x.Cost,
                            status = x.QuoteStatus
                        };


        // I would like to loop thru list and make changes to it here

        GridView1.DataSource = orderlist;
        GridView1.DataBind();

    }
}
share|improve this question
    
If you want to make changes, change the query. Btw, this is not a list. –  Tim Schmelter May 10 '12 at 16:30
    
The changes (down the road) I need to make might not be possible in a query. What is the object called as opposed to list? –  Dave May 10 '12 at 16:31
1  
Are you trying to make changes in the DB, or just for display? If you're trying to make changes in the DB, change it to select x, make the changes you want, and at the end do cqsDC.SubmitChanges();. If just for display, make it quote = x.Order == null ? x.Quote : null. –  Tim S. May 10 '12 at 16:34
    
It is just for display. I'd be happy to change the query for now, and thanks for the help with that. I am just predicting a lot of crazy requests for changes that might be hard to do in queries. But this works for now. –  Dave May 10 '12 at 16:36
    
Also, in regard to your confusion about looping being discouraged: an IQueryable that represents a DB connection is only processed (which is very expensive) when you actually loop through it, so you shouldn't loop through it willy-nilly. –  Tim S. May 10 '12 at 16:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You end up with an IQueryable<anonymoustype> with your current query. Since they're anonymous types they're readonly and can't be changed anyway.

Your best option, especially if you intend to have more complex manipulations that can't be done in the query by the database, is to use a class instead. You'll also want to add a ToList() at the end of your query so you end up with a List<YourClass> and can then loop over it as you usually would and change the objects.

So make a class that has all your properties, for example MasterQuote, and use that in your query instead:

var query = from x in cqsDC.MasterQuoteRecs
                where x.CustomerNumber == accountNumber && x.DateCreated > DateTime.Now.AddDays(howfar)
                orderby x.DateCreated descending
                select new MasterQuote
                {
                    Customer = x.customername,
                    Order = x.OrderReserveNumber,
                    Quote = x.Quote,
                    Date = Convert.ToDateTime(x.DateCreated).ToShortDateString(),
                    Project = x.ProjectName,
                    Total = x.Cost,
                    Status = x.QuoteStatus
                };

var orderList = query.ToList();

foreach (var item in orderList)
{
    if (item.OrderReserveNumber > 0)
    {
        item.Quote = "";
    }
}

Your MasterQuote class would look something like:

public class MasterQuote
{
    public string Customer { get; set; }
    public int Order { get; set; }
    // and so on
}

Of course for your given example you could probably accomplish the Quote manipulation in your query as seth mentioned.

share|improve this answer
    
That sounds like my best option. Do you have any link on how to do this? I'm obivously a little new to Linq. –  Dave May 10 '12 at 16:38
    
Haven't yet tried it, but this looks like it will work. Thanks. –  Dave May 10 '12 at 16:41

Just use a ternary operator.

select new
{
    customer = x.customername,
    order = x.OrderReserveNumber,
    quote = x.OrderReserveNumber != null ? string.Empty : x.Quote,
    date = Convert.ToDateTime(x.DateCreated).ToShortDateString(),
    project = x.ProjectName,
    total = x.Cost,
    status = x.QuoteStatus
};
share|improve this answer

Depends on how complex the changes are really, but the one you mentioned could be done with a simple method on a static class.

Of you could just chain linq statements together, and do the equivalent of sql case for the quote column.

It seems unlikely that OrderList doesn't implement IEnumerable so if all the linq gets too messy foreach will do the job.

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