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I'm wondering if someone knows/has a C macro to compute a static Unix time from a hard coded date and time as in:

time_t t = UNIX_TIMESTAMP(2012, 5, 10, 9, 26, 13);

I'm looking into that because I want to have a numeric static timestamp. This will be done hundred of times throughout the software, each time with a different date, and I want to make sure it is fast because it will run hundreds of times every second. Converting dates that many times would definitively slow down things (i.e. calling mktime() is slower than having a static number compiled in place, right?)

[made an update to try to render this paragraph clearer, Nov 23, 2012]

Update

I want to clarify the question with more information about the process being used. As my server receives requests, for each request, it starts a new process. That process is constantly updated with new plugins and quite often such updates require a database update. Those must be run only once. To know whether an update is necessary, I want to use a Unix date (which is better than using a counter because a counter is much more likely to break once in a while.)

The plugins will thus receive an update signal and have their on_update() function called. There I want to do something like this:

void some_plugin::on_update(time_t last_update)
{
  if(last_update < UNIX_TIMESTAMP(2010, 3, 22, 20, 9, 26)) {
    ...run update...
  }
  if(last_update < UNIX_TIMESTAMP(2012, 5, 10, 9, 26, 13)) {
    ...run update...
  }
  // as many test as required...
}

As you can see, if I have to compute the unix timestamp each time, this could represent thousands of calls per process and if you receive 100 hits a second x 1000 calls, you wasted 100,000 calls when you could have had the compiler compute those numbers once at compile time.

Putting the value in a static variable is of no interest because this code will run once per process run.

Note that the last_update variable changes depending on the website being hit (it comes from the database.)

Code

Okay, I got the code now:

// helper (Days in February)
#define _SNAP_UNIX_TIMESTAMP_FDAY(year) \
    (((year) % 400) == 0 ? 29LL : \
        (((year) % 100) == 0 ? 28LL : \
            (((year) % 4) == 0 ? 29LL : \
                28LL)))

// helper (Days in the year)
#define _SNAP_UNIX_TIMESTAMP_YDAY(year, month, day) \
    ( \
        /* January */    static_cast<qint64>(day) \
        /* February */ + ((month) >=  2 ? 31LL : 0LL) \
        /* March */    + ((month) >=  3 ? _SNAP_UNIX_TIMESTAMP_FDAY(year) : 0LL) \
        /* April */    + ((month) >=  4 ? 31LL : 0LL) \
        /* May */      + ((month) >=  5 ? 30LL : 0LL) \
        /* June */     + ((month) >=  6 ? 31LL : 0LL) \
        /* July */     + ((month) >=  7 ? 30LL : 0LL) \
        /* August */   + ((month) >=  8 ? 31LL : 0LL) \
        /* September */+ ((month) >=  9 ? 31LL : 0LL) \
        /* October */  + ((month) >= 10 ? 30LL : 0LL) \
        /* November */ + ((month) >= 11 ? 31LL : 0LL) \
        /* December */ + ((month) >= 12 ? 30LL : 0LL) \
    )

#define SNAP_UNIX_TIMESTAMP(year, month, day, hour, minute, second) \
    ( /* time */ static_cast<qint64>(second) \
                + static_cast<qint64>(minute) * 60LL \
                + static_cast<qint64>(hour) * 3600LL \
    + /* year day (month + day) */ (_SNAP_UNIX_TIMESTAMP_YDAY(year, month, day) - 1) * 86400LL \
    + /* year */ (static_cast<qint64>(year) - 1970LL) * 31536000LL \
                + ((static_cast<qint64>(year) - 1969LL) / 4LL) * 86400LL \
                - ((static_cast<qint64>(year) - 1901LL) / 100LL) * 86400LL \
                + ((static_cast<qint64>(year) - 1601LL) / 400LL) * 86400LL )

WARNING: Do not use these macros to dynamically compute a date. It is SLOWER than mktime(). This being said, if you have a hard coded date, then the compiler will compute the time_t value at compile time. Slower to compile, but faster to execute over and over again.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The formula is in POSIX:

tm_sec + tm_min*60 + tm_hour*3600 + tm_yday*86400 +
    (tm_year-70)*31536000 + ((tm_year-69)/4)*86400 -
    ((tm_year-1)/100)*86400 + ((tm_year+299)/400)*86400

Source: XBD 4.15 Seconds Since the Epoch http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/basedefs/V1_chap04.html#tag_04_15

share|improve this answer
    
R.. that is perfect! Exactly what I was looking for. I wrote date conversions before and was wary of the "complex" computations that the tm_year requires to determine Feb. # of days. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregorian_calendar –  Alexis Wilke May 10 '12 at 17:56
    
By the way, "yday" does take a bit of trouble to compute from month/mday since it requires knowing the number of days in February. But you should be able to derive that from the last 3 terms in the formula without much trouble. I'd factor your macro into a couple macros - first one to compute the # of days in feb for a given year, then a julian (yday) macro for a given year based on that, and finally plug those values into the above formula in a third macro. –  R.. May 11 '12 at 2:57
    
The Algorithm to compute a leap year is well defined on Wikipedia. This at least works with the Gregorian calendar from before 1970. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leap_year#Algorithm –  Alexis Wilke May 11 '12 at 6:09

If you measured that it's actually too slow, then here is a practical simple workaround solution:

void myfun() {
  static time_t t = 0;
  if (t == 0)
    t = slow_unix_timestamp(2012, 5, 10, 9, 26, 13);
}

Now it's calculated only once.

share|improve this answer
    
Dammit, you beat me to it :-) –  Eitan T May 10 '12 at 16:42
    
-1, this is not C. static storage duration objects requires constant expressions as their initializers. –  R.. May 10 '12 at 16:59
    
I will potentially have thousands of dates and I don't want to parse each one of them at compile time! Each one will be checked only once too. So there is no need for a static in my case. What I really want is a number at compile time. –  Alexis Wilke May 10 '12 at 17:18
    
sorry, what you wrote ("I want to make sure it is fast because it will run hundreds of times every second") suggested you recalculate these... –  Karoly Horvath May 10 '12 at 23:38
    
@R..: fixed it. –  Karoly Horvath May 10 '12 at 23:40

Not a macro, but the timestamp will only be initialized once, subsequent calls to get_timestamp() will simple be a memory access. You pay the initialization penalty at runtime, but only the first time get_timestamp() is called, knowing that you can initialize it early in your program and allow subsequent calls to be effectively "free".

time_t initialize_timestamp(int y, int m, int d, int h, int min, s)
{
   tm t;
   t.tm_year = y - 1900;
   t.tm_mon = m;
   t.tm.mday = d;
   t.tm_hour = h;
   t.tm_min = min;
   t.tm_sec = s;

   return mktime(&t);
}

time_t get_static_timestamp()
{
   static time_t ts = initialize_timestamp(2012, 5, 10, 9, 26, 13);
   return ts;
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1, this is not C. static storage duration objects requires constant expressions as their initializers. –  R.. May 10 '12 at 17:00
    
When I answered, the question was tagged as C++. That has recently changed :(. –  Chad May 10 '12 at 17:01
    
OK, -1 removed. It's still not a good answer though; it just moves the overhead to run before main instead of after main starts, and leaves the data non-constant (and non-shareable) in memory. –  R.. May 10 '12 at 17:02
    
Oddly, the question title said C all along... –  R.. May 10 '12 at 17:02
    
I also thought I tagged my question as C++ since I'm writing C++. I guess Crazy Eddie changed that. I think C++ tag is more appropriate if C++ allows for such simplifications. Anyway, I will potentially have thousands of dates and I don't want to parse each one of them at compile time! –  Alexis Wilke May 10 '12 at 17:17

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