Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a class defined like so:

class GameState:

    def __init__(self, state=None):
        if state is None:
            self.fps = 60
            self.speed = 1
            self.bounciness = 0.9
            self.current_level = None

            self.next_frame_time = 0
            self.init_time = 0
            self.real_time = 0
            self.game_time = 0

            self.game_events = []
            self.real_events = []
        else:
            # THIS being the key line:
            self.__dict__.update(**state)

Is there an interface I can define, such that this works (i.e. the ** operator works on my class):

>>> a = GameState()
>>> b = GameState(a)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: update() argument after ** must be a mapping, not GameState

Essentially, I want b to take on all of the attributes of a.

I didn't think it would work, but I tried defining __getitem__ without any luck.

EDIT: I want to avoid using b's __dict__, as I want to also be able to pass a dictionary as an argument, and potentially use ** on GameState objects elsewhere.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

in order for **obj to work, you have to implement (or inherit) the __getitem__() and keys() methods.

def __getitem__(self, item):
    return self.__dict__[item] # you maybe should return a copy
def keys(self):
    return self.__dict__.keys() # you could filter those
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, this is what I was looking for! :) –  Darthfett May 10 '12 at 17:33

let GameState inherit from dict :

class GameState(dict) 

and rewrite the __setattr function like this :

def __setattr__(self,name,value) :
    self.__dict__[name] = value
    self[name] = value
share|improve this answer
    
Does this use the __dict__ for everything, or would I need to define a custom __getattr__ to look up a name using self[name] in order to get my existing __init__ to work? –  Darthfett May 10 '12 at 17:20
1  
with the setattr addition, it will be both a dict and a normal object –  Emil M May 10 '12 at 17:27
    
Ah, thanks! I'm not sure what other functionality dict would provide, so since I'm trying to be as lightweight as possible, I will be using ch3ka's solution, which provides the minimal interface. Upvote for the useful answer, though. :) –  Darthfett May 10 '12 at 17:32

you could do that by updating the b's dict with that of a when creating b. Try this out:

class GameState:

    def __init__(self, state=None):
        if state is None:
            self.fps = 60
            self.speed = 1
            self.bounciness = 0.9
            self.current_level = None

            self.next_frame_time = 0
            self.init_time = 0
            self.real_time = 0
            self.game_time = 0

            self.game_events = []
            self.real_events = []
        else:
            if type(state) is dict:
                self.__dict__.update(**state)
            else:
                self.__dict__.update(**state.__dict__)

a = GameState() 
b = GameState(a)

you might want to create a deepcopy of the dict because you have a list object as part of the attributes. This is safer as there is no sharing of objects.

share|improve this answer
    
I should have put in this in the question (see my edit), but I was hoping to avoid using a's __dict__, as I want the ** operator to work on the object. –  Darthfett May 10 '12 at 17:13
    
you could test for the type of state. If it is an object of type Gamestate then you use __dict__ else you just use as a normal dict. –  cobie May 10 '12 at 17:17
    
I wouldn't want to have to do this anywhere GameState might be used. I also think try: self.__dict__.update(**state); except TypeError: self.__dict__.update(**state.__dict__) might be more pythonic. Using type is the wrong way to check an object's type. –  Darthfett May 10 '12 at 17:28
    
+1 for "you might want to create a deepcopy of the dict because you have a list object as part of the attributes. This is safer as there is no sharing of objects." -- Although using copy.deepcopy isn't good (I don't want it to go too deep), I have a use-case for keeping the old object. –  Darthfett May 10 '12 at 18:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.