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class c {
    private:
        int n[10];
    public:
        c();
        ~c();
        int operator()(int i) { return n[i];};
};

class cc {
    private:

    public:
        c *mass;
        cc();
        ~cc();
        c& operator*() const {return *mass;};
};
int somfunc() {
    c *c1 = new c();

    cc * cc1 = new cc();

    (*cc1->mass)(1);



    delete c1;
}

I've got a pointer into class cc to class c.

Is there any way to get rid of record like this:

(*cc1->mass)(1);

and write somethink like that:

cc1->mass(1);

is it impossible?

share|improve this question
1  
Why have so many pointers in the first place? It might be more constructive to fix the coding style rather than to worry about why a really ugly piece of code looks... really ugly. –  Kerrek SB May 10 '12 at 17:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When I saw the tags "c++" and "operator overloading", my mind alarm turns ON.

C++ operator overloading is complex, and some operators like "()" or "->" make it more difficult.

I suggest, before overloading operators, making either a global function or method with the same purpouse, test it works, and later replace it with the operator.

Global friend function example:

class c {
    private:
        int n[10];      

    public:
        c();
        ~c();

        // int operator()(int i) { return n[i]; } 

        // there is a friend global function, that when receives a "c" object,
        // as a parameter, or declares a "c" object, as a local variable,
        // this function, will have access to the "public" members of "c" objects,
        // the "thisref" will be removed, when turned into a method
        friend int c_subscript(c thisref, int i) ;
};

int c_subscript(c* thisref, int i)
{
  return c->n[i];
}

int main()
{
  c* objC() = new c();
  // do something with "objcC"

  int x = c_subscript(objC, 3);
  // do something with "x"

  return 0;
} // int main(...)

Local function ( "method" ) example:

class c {
    private:
        int n[10];      

    public:
        c();
        ~c();

        // int operator()(int i) { return n[i]; }

        int subscript(int i) ;
};

int c::subscript(int i)
{
  return this.n[i];
}

int main()
{
  c* objC() = new c();
  // do something with "objcC"

  int x = c->subscript(objC, 3);
  // do something with "x"

  return 0;
} // int main(...)

And, finally use the overloaded operator:

class c {
    private:
        int n[10];      

    public:
        c();
        ~c();   

        int subscript(int i) ;

        int operator()(int i) { return this.subscript(i); }
};

int c::subscript(int i)
{
  return this.n[i];
}

int main()
{
  c* objC() = new c();
  // do something with "objcC"

  int x = c->subscript(3);
  // do something with "x"

  int x = c(3);
  // do something with "x"

  return 0;
} // int main(...)

Note that in the final example, I keep the method with a unique identifier.

Cheers.

share|improve this answer

Could always do this:

class cc {
    private:
        c *_mass;

    public:
        c& mass() const {return *_mass;};
};

Now..

cc1->mass()(1);
share|improve this answer

If mass were an object, not a pointer, you could use the syntax you want:

class cc {
  private:

  public:
    c mass;
    cc();
    ~cc();
    const c& operator*() const {return mass;};
};

…

    cc1->mass(1);
share|improve this answer
    
i want to use something like this : c* mass; –  meteor May 10 '12 at 20:18
    
If you make mass a pointer, then you must dereference it before you can use the function syntax. If you make mass an object, then you may use the function syntax directly. You'll have to decide which feature you want more. –  Robᵩ May 10 '12 at 20:21

You can with

(*(*cc1))(1)

because operator() is applied to an object, not a pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
@Nim ideone.com/kEhU6 dani's doesn't compile. –  Luchian Grigore May 10 '12 at 17:14
    
aww crap - it's a pointer! DOH.. –  Nim May 10 '12 at 17:16
    
@Nim exactly... –  Luchian Grigore May 10 '12 at 17:16

You can use

(**cc1)(1);

Or

cc1->mass->operator()(1);
share|improve this answer
    
doesn't compile ideone.com/kEhU6 –  Luchian Grigore May 10 '12 at 17:15
    
@LuchianGrigore: fixed –  Dani May 10 '12 at 17:17

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