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I need help solving the problem below.

I am creating a Windows Forms Application with a MDI interface. In my application, I made a class that basically handles all opening / closing of all child forms, let’s call it FManage. In addition, it also checks to see if a form instance is open. If so, it doesn’t let the user open another instance of the form. This is where my issue lies. When a window is asked to be opened by a user, FManage the following code:

if (frm1 == null)
{
    frmOne = new frm1();
    frmOne.MdiParent = Main.ActiveForm; //Main is the parent form
}
frmOne.Show();

Now this code works fine when the window is first opened. Say frm1 is closed and asked to be opened again. The code above is executed again, however, frm1 does not equal NULL. I’ve set a break point at the code above in the FManage class and it shows frm1 != null, even though frm1 was closed. I believe the issue is that frm1, since it is stored as a reference in FManage, is not telling FManage it is null. FManage just stores its initial state of the form, similar to a static variable. I am new to OOP and am really looking for the best way to solve this issue.

My first solution is that before frm1 closes, possibly in the FormClosing event, send a message back to the FManage class to set frm1 to null; however, in order to do this, the frm1 class would need to know about FManage, which right now it doesn’t. FManage knows about frm1, not the other way around. Sharing is not mutual. Just for reference, frm1 is defined as a method after my class is defined:

public class FManage
{
    frmOne frm1;
 ...
}

Any suggestions on how to solve this issue would be greatly appreciated.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The key to solve your problem is the subclassing of the FormClosing event.
Set an handler for that event just when you open the form.
Then in that event (if you agree to close) set your global var to null.
This will reset correctly your logic to open a new INSTANCE of frmOne.
Don't confuse frmOne (the class) with frm1 (the instance of frmOne)

public class FManage 
{ 
    frmOne frm1; 
    ... 

    // Here test on frm1 and create a new instance of frm1
    if (frm1 == null) 
    { 
        frm1 = new frmOne(); 
        frm1.FormClosing += fManage_FormOneClosing;
        frm1.MdiParent = Main.ActiveForm; 
    } 
    frm1.Show(); 

    ...

    public void fManage_FormOneClosing(object sender, FormClosingEventArgs e) 
    {
        ... (check if you agree to close the form frm1

        // set the instance of frmOne captured in the global var to null....
        frm1 = null;
    }
} 
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This worked perfectly. This is exactly what I needed. My first time actually handing an Event. I wish I could accept multiple answers as yours, Steve Wong's, Dark Falcons advice was actually what I needed. –  brazc0re May 10 '12 at 18:07

A Form is an object just like any other object. Its lifetime is controlled by whether it is still reachable. Hence, hiding (closing) a form will never destroy an object or set anything to null.

You need to handle the FormClosed event of the form to know when it has been closed.

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From MSDN:

When a form is closed, all resources created within the object are closed and the form is disposed. You can prevent the closing of a form at run time by handling the Closing event and setting the Cancel property of the CancelEventArgs passed as a parameter to your event handler. If the form you are closing is the startup form of your application, your application ends.

The two conditions when a form is not disposed on Close is when (1) it is part of a multiple-document interface (MDI) application, and the form is not visible; and (2) you have displayed the form using ShowDialog. In these cases, you will need to call Dispose manually to mark all of the form's controls for garbage collection.

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Thank you. I should have referred to the documenatation first. Since the form is part of an MDI interface, it is not disposed when it is closed. This helps. –  brazc0re May 10 '12 at 17:58

One option is to handle the FormClosing event as you have described. You don't need the form to "know" about FManage. You could have FManage subscribe to the event like so:

frm1.FormClosing += this.FormClosing; // this is FManage

Another option is to check if the Visible property of the form is true when you are creating the child forms.

if (frmOne == null || !frmOne.Visible)
{
    frmOne = new frm1();
    frmOne.MdiParent = Main.ActiveForm; //Main is the parent form
}
else
{
    // form is already created.  maybe bring to front?
    frmOne.BringToFront();
}
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Thank you. Yes I approached the answer by subscribing to frm1's FormClose event. –  brazc0re May 10 '12 at 18:06

If frmOne hasn't passed out of scope, it wouldn't get disposed. It will retain whatever value you gave it (in this case an instance of frm1). You can create a new frm1 object every time you need to display one if you want.

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Another solution is to iterate through My.Application.OpenForms collection to check wich Forms are open.
They are removed from this collection when their onFormClosed internal method/event gets called.

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You can use lambda:

public class FManage 
{ 
    frmOne frm1; 
    ... 

    // Here test on frm1 and create a new instance of frm1
    if (frm1 == null) 
    { 
        frm1 = new frmOne(); 
        frm1.FormClosing += (sndr, evnt) => { frm1 = null; };
        frm1.MdiParent = this; 
    } 
    frm1.Show(); 

    ...

} 
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