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Rails 3.1, Ruby 1.9.2

I am trying to adapt Railscasts episode 345 (HSTORE) to an application I am building -- This issue is not HSTORE centric...as I'd also run into it if I were serializing the Properties hash.

Here is the code I have a question on:

Class Product < ActiveRecord::Base

has_many :properties

%w[author rating runtime].each do |key| #  *****--> PLEASE SEE BELOW!
  attr_accessible key
  scope "has_#{key}", lambda { |value| where("properties @> (? => ?)", key, value) }

  define_method(key) do
    properties && properties[key]
  end

  define_method("#{key}=") do |value|
    self.properties = (properties || {}).merge(key => value)
  end
end

* Now, here's the twist. The product class has many properties that are assigned by an administrator on creation. This is done in a joined model called Property.

So, instead of the array of properties, I would like to search a joined has_many model called Property and have the array be populated with a collection of the property ids.

I have tried replacing the declared array of %w[author rating runtime] with

self.properties.collect{ |property| "property_#{property.id}" }.each do |key|

but that does not work!! I get an undefined method error on the properties relationship (I assume it's because the model isn't instantiated yet?) I'm fairly new to programming and know nothing about metaprogramming.

EDIT - I've tried to move all of this into an after_find hook and this doesn't work either (along with the dozens of other unsuccessful attempts.) So lost...

Any help is greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
the method properties is only available for an instance of product. Are you wanting to completely replace the semantics of @product.properties? (i.e. eliminate has_many :properties), or do you want to keep the normal semantics and supplement it in some way? – RadBrad May 11 '12 at 16:03
    
Thanks for the reply - I'd like to keep the normal semantics (because I'd like to still be able to query @product.properties) but add to them. For example, if product 1 only has properties author and rating assigned, I'd like to keep the runtime attribute out of the accessible attributes list for this instance. On the other hand, if the product has all properties assigned through the join, I'd like to have all the properties available as accessible... – Angelo Chrysoulakis May 11 '12 at 16:08
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well, after a couple of days of hacking, I think I finally figured this out.

Any and ALL pinions on how 'sound' this solution is are greatly appreciated!

In short, all I did was wrap the above block of code (beginning with the % sign) into a method like so:

def dynamic_accessible_and_setters(*details)
  details.each do |key| # I placed the details variable here instead of the %w[]
    attr_accessible key
    scope "has_#{key}", lambda { |value| where("properties @> (? => ?)", key, value) }

    define_method(key) do
      properties && properties[key]
    end

    define_method("#{key}=") do |value|
      self.properties = (properties || {}).merge(key => value)
    end
  end
end

Then, in the controller, I just called the method from the class and assigned the array of attributes:

def edit
  PRODUCT.dynamic_accessible_and_setters("author", "rating", "runtime")
  ...
end

And now I have dynamically built getters, setters and attr_accessible, custom for each instance of the class (or, so, I think?!)

I hope this helps someone! And now off to see the performance tradeoff of multiple db writes vs. serialization and one write.

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