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I came across this problem in javabat(http://www.javabat.com/prob/p183562):

We want to make a row of bricks that is goal inches long. We have a number of small bricks (1 inch each) and big bricks (5 inches each). Return true if it is possible to make the goal by choosing from the given bricks. This is a little harder than it looks and can be done without any loops.

makeBricks(3, 1, 8) → true
makeBricks(3, 1, 9) → false
makeBricks(3, 2, 10) → true

I came up with this solution:

public boolean makeBricks(int small, int big, int goal) {
    if (goal > small + big * 5)
        return false;
    else if (goal % 5 == 0) 
        return goal / 5 <= big;
    else
        return goal % 5 <= small;
}

This passed the test. But I found a counter-example myself: makeBricks(10, 0, 10) -> true. My logic will return false. How should I fix my logic? Or is there a better way to do this?

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do we want to make the goal exactly or can we exceed it? I assume we want >=. –  Victor Jun 28 '09 at 1:24
    
my assumption was wrong :p –  Victor Jun 28 '09 at 1:56
    
This is of course ... one of the practice problems on a Java and Python learning website ... codingbat.com –  user688652 Apr 2 '11 at 5:43

9 Answers 9

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I think you can just remove your second test. I would try this:

public boolean makeBricks(int small, int big, int goal) {
    if (goal > small + big * 5)
        return false;
    else
        return goal % 5 <= small;
}
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Your logic is incorrect. This should do it:

public boolean makeBricks(int small, int big, int goal) {
  if (goal < 0 || big < 0 || small < 0) {
    throw new IllegalArgumentException();
  } else if (goal > big * 5 + small) {
    return false;
  } else if (goal % 5 <= small) {
    return true;
  } else {
    return false;
  }
}

is sufficient. This can be simplified to:

public boolean makeBricks(int small, int big, int goal) {
  if (goal < 0 || big < 0 || small < 0) {
    throw new IllegalArgumentException();
  } else {
    return goal <= big * 5 + small && goal % 5 <= small;
  }
}

Of course, the sanity check on negative goal, small or big is not strictly required but recommended. Without those checks, the result can simply be obtained by:

public boolean makeBricks(int small, int big, int goal) {
  return goal <= big * 5 + small && goal % 5 <= small;
}
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I don't think so - for example, your logic would produce true for makeBricks(0, 5, 4), where you can't actually make a four-inch goal line using only a five-inch brick. –  Tim Jun 28 '09 at 1:18
11  
Um, no it wouldn't. Is goal <= big * 5 + small? Yes. But goal % 5 is 4. Small is 0 so it returns false. Please try it before incorrectly stating it's wrong. –  cletus Jun 28 '09 at 1:24

The second test is entirely unnecessary. The first one checks to see that you have enough total length, and all is good.

But the second one again checks if you have enough total length (return goal / 5 <= big;) but this ignores the length added by small bricks. The issue is you are checking if it is a multiple of 5, and automatically assuming that you are going to use only large bricks if it is. In reality, you could use five small bricks instead. (or, as in your example, 10 small bricks.) The last check is correct, testing if you have enough granularity to get the right length, assuming you have enough length.

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I tried some other scenarios: "makeBricks(8, 1, 13)" "makeBricks(1, 2, 6)" where either you have not enough or too many big bricks, but you need some. To account for both possibilities You would need something like:

public boolean makeBricks(int small, int big, int goal) {
  /* Not enough bricks to make the goal so don't bother */
  if (goal > small + big * 5)
     return false;

  /* How many big bricks can we use */
  int bigBricksToUse = Math.min(big, (goal / 5) );

  /* If we use that many bigs, do we have enough small */
  return goal - (bigBricksToUse * 5) <= small;
 }
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it's returning false because your second check is only comparing it to the bigs, which in your counter example you have zero of.

so 2<=0 is false.

here's a good way to do it:

return (Math.min(goal/5,big)*5 + small) >= goal;

This way you're sure to use only as many large bricks as you need, but no more, guaranteeing that the only way to reach the goal is if you have enough small bricks.

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here's another practice problem i thought of that's fairly similar to this problem, just thought i'd post it and see if it works for people:

you are given an int SO starting reputation and an int SO goal reputation that is higher than the starting rep. You only answer questions so you can gain reputation only by either 10 or 15. you can also down vote so you can lose reputation by 1 as well. what is the minimum amount of reputation that you should lose to reach the target reputation?

example: you start with 715 and you want to reach 888. the answer is 2.

to increase the challenge change the ints to longs and don't use a loop.

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Here is my original answer; it didn't work for the other tests, but at the time I couldn't figure out how it did not(still really can't), and the correct answer pisses me of because even though it checks out it sucks balls that it actually works because a certain statement is damn false. Rant rant rant, well any way here:

public boolean makeBricks(int small, int big, int goal) {

if(goal<=((big*5)+small) && goal%(big*5)<=small){ return true; } return false; }

Correct answer here, though it can suck it:

public boolean makeBricks(int small, int big, int goal) {

if(goal<=((big*5)+small) && goal%5<=small){ return true; } return false; }

if small is >= the remainder, it should be true, and always will be, and if it is not then it cannot be true. Why does my way not work, and this way work in its imperfection? Yes the previous statement (goal<=((big*5)+small)) chops off all instances where it does not work, but I made that blanket statement to cancel out that anything not equal to the total sum of inches is false, not for that purpose, I derived it from the old math problem in every mathematical subject I have had so far, which gets broken down in simplest form to this: w=(ax+bx) where w= whole a= a number(in this case 5) value an operation larger than the number represented by b(in this case 1) and x is the LCF between the two values being found(in this case 1 again) most adequately by this geometrical algebraic problem an angle is 36 degrees greater than two twice its supplementary angle(x=2(180-x)+36;x=396-2x;3x=396;x=132).Normally a hint is given as to one groups amount though, not just variables. And what is wrong with mine, where is the instance where it does not work?

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This is my answer.

private static boolean makeBricks (int small, int big, int goal) {

    return ((big * 5 + small) >= goal) && (goal % big <= small);
}
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Welcome to Stack Overflow! Would you consider adding some narrative to explain why this code works, and what makes it an answer to the question? –  Andrew Barber May 11 '12 at 2:29
    
This solution fails when there are more big bricks than needed, and also has a / by zero exception for makeBricks(20, 0, 19) –  dansalmo Dec 20 '13 at 20:13
    
return !(big*5 + small < goal || goal%5 > small); works –  dansalmo Dec 20 '13 at 20:18
private boolean makeBricks (int small, int big, int goal) {
    return !(big*5 + small < goal || small < goal%5);
}

Uses only boolean operators to check for the absence of both failure cases !(fail || fail). The obvious, not enough bricks to make the goal big*5 + small < goal. The less obvious, not enough small bricks when goal is not an even multiple of 5 small < goal%5.

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