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How would you guys go around with storing passwords for an online password manager in a MySQL database? Nothing big, just a few users. I can't really hash them or something because it's irreversible right? How do programs like KeePass achieve this?

Thanks in advance!

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Usually the users' passwords are encrypted using a master password before transmission to you; you would then store the encrypted password and return it to the user upon their request: they would then decrypt on their own machine using their master password. At no point do you handle the master password or the unencrypted passwords, therefore you are totally unable to access the underlying passwords you store. –  eggyal May 10 '12 at 18:13
    
@eggyal how would I do this via PHP? I understand I need a master password but how would I reverse a hashed string with this master password? –  Cas Cornelissen May 10 '12 at 18:19
    
Well, if you're following the pattern I describe, you won't perform the encryption in PHP (which is server-side) - you should do it on the client-side. If your application is web-based, you could do it in Javascript (although you should be very wary of XSS and browser security vulnerabilities) - the Stanford Javascript Crypto Library is a good place to start. –  eggyal May 10 '12 at 18:21
    
Ah, now I reread it I do understand what you mean. I will look into the Crypto Library although I am a novice programmer (and new to StackOverflow) and it will probably take a while to discover how I would do this. Anyway, thanks for the answer! I can't set comments as accepted answers so what do I need to do now? –  Cas Cornelissen May 10 '12 at 18:26
    
I've posted as an answer. :) –  eggyal May 10 '12 at 18:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

(Upgrading to an answer)

Usually users' passwords are encrypted using a master password before transmission to you, the password manager; you would store such encrypted passwords and return them to the user upon their request: they would then decrypt on their own machine using their master password. At no point do you handle the master password or the unencrypted passwords, therefore you are totally unable to access the underlying passwords you store.

If your application is web-based, you could perform the crypto operations in Javascript (although you should be very wary of XSS and browser security vulnerabilities) - the Stanford Javascript Crypto Library is a good place to start.

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Thanks for this fast & awesome answer! –  Cas Cornelissen May 10 '12 at 18:29

Hashing a password is, indeed, irreversible. But you hash a password for exactly that reason:

  1. Hash the password. Insert into database.
  2. User tries to log in, provides password. User-provided password is hashed. If it matches what is in the database, authenticate user.

Programs generally provide the following:

setPassword(user, password); //puts the (hashed) password into a database table associated with user
authenticate(user, password); //for given user, checks to see if password is valid

That said, this question is very broad and will likely get downvoted. You're not asking a specific question or saying what you've tried thus far.

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This isn't very applicable to a password manager application. –  eggyal May 10 '12 at 18:14
    
I indeed want a password manager application and thus I need to know what passwords are stored. I need it to be reversible. –  Cas Cornelissen May 10 '12 at 18:18
    
Ah, I misunderstood what you were attempting. The crypto schemes for that are much more intense and I don't know them offhand. –  Nathaniel Ford May 10 '12 at 18:34

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