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I'm not sure if I'm using classes correctly. I'm attempting to build a simple menu using pygame. This is my first foray into gui stuff. I have no idea how to structure my code.

I found that I could make a general Button class to handle all of the mouse over/mouse click stuff, and then I can subclass that for each button, and override the do_action method to give each button a specific action.

class Button(pygame.sprite.Sprite):
    global screen_flags
    def __init__(self, images, pos):
        pygame.sprite.Sprite.__init__(self)
        self.images = images
        self.image = images[0]
        self.rect  = self.image.get_rect()
        self.rect.move_ip(pos)


    def update(self, events, surface):
        # if not screen_flags['config']:
        for event in events:
            if event.type == MOUSEMOTION:
                if self.rect.collidepoint(event.pos):
                    self.image = self.images[1]
                else:
                    self.image = self.images[0]
            elif event.type == MOUSEBUTTONDOWN:
                if event.button == 1 and self.rect.collidepoint(event.pos):
                    self.image = self.images[-1]
                    screen_flags['config'] = 1
                    self.do_action()
                    self.set_flag()

            elif event.type == MOUSEBUTTONUP:
                self.image = self.images[0]


        screen.blit(self.image, self.rect)

    def do_action(self):
        pass
    def set_flag(self):
        pass


class CheckBox(Button):
    def __init__(self, images, pos):
        Button.__init__(self, images, pos)
        self.is_clicked = False

    def update(self, events, surface):
        for event in events:
            if event.type == MOUSEMOTION:
                if not self.is_clicked:
                    if self.rect.collidepoint(event.pos):
                        self.image = self.images[1]
                    else:
                        self.image = self.images[0]
            elif event.type == MOUSEBUTTONDOWN:
                if event.button == 1 and self.rect.collidepoint(event.pos):
                    if not self.is_clicked:
                        self.image = self.images[-1]
                        self.is_clicked = True
                    else:
                        self.image = self.images[0]
                        self.is_clicked = False
        screen.blit(self.image, self.rect)


class Cancel(Button):
    def do_action(self):
        screen_flags['config'] = 0

So, as you can see,they don't really do anything yet. I can toggle the check box on and off, and open and close one 'config' window, but that's as far as I've gotten. The rest of the code:

global count
global sTime



config_button_img = load_sliced_images(25, 25, c_buttons)
config_button = Button(config_button_img, (608,4))

input_bar = load_sliced_images(351,33, inpt_bar)
text_box = Textbox(input_bar, (144,155))

s_button = load_sliced_images(110,32, sbmt_bttn)
submit = Button(s_button, (241,301))

c_button = load_sliced_images(110,32, cncl_bttn)
cancel = Cancel(c_button, (385, 301))

c_boxes = load_sliced_images(20,19, chk_box)
check_box = CheckBox(c_boxes, (200,200))    

try:
    while True:
        # ****************************
        # Pygame section
        events = pygame.event.get()
        for event in events:
            if event.type == QUIT:
                screen_flags['alert'] = 1
                ding.play(0,1000)
            elif event.type == MOUSEBUTTONDOWN:
                text_box.set_focus(event.button, event.pos)





        screen.blit(background, (0,0))
        screen.blit(client_logo, (0,30))
        screen.blit(tag, (174,462))

        if screen_flags['config']:
            screen.blit(config_window_img, (0,0))

            submit.update(events, screen)
            cancel.update(events, screen)
            check_box.update(events, screen)
        if screen_flags['alert']:
            screen.blit(alert_dialog, (0,0))

        config_button.update(events, screen)
        pygame.display.update()   








except KeyboardInterrupt:
    try: 
        pygame.quit()
    except:
        pass

So this works kind of as expected. I'm unsure where to go from here. Do I continue to wrap up logic inside of the classes? For instance, the next thing I'm attempting to do is make it so that when the "cancel" button is clicked it unchecks the check box.

I tried changing the Cancel class to do just that.

class Cancel(Button):
    def do_action(self):
        screen_flags['config'] = 0
        check_box.is_clicked=False

However, this is giving me a GlobalName Error. How do I target an instance method from within a different class? Is this even the correct way to go about it? Or have only some logic, like the update() stuff to take care of the mouse, in then handle what the classes do by passing variables to and from the different classes fro main()? Should I have all of the classes use global variables?

Is there any good articles on gui practices. Things like how to structure code etc..?

Hopefully the above makes sense.

share|improve this question
    
Just get a reference to the class A object and call the method? –  Jeff Mercado May 10 '12 at 18:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Personally, I would make it so that each of my classes accepted screen_flags as an argument to the constructor (__init__). Then each of your classes would have a handle on the "global" data that they need. A real easy way to do this is...

class Cancel(Button):
      def __init__(self,*args,**kwargs):
          self.screen_flags=kwargs.pop('screen_flags')
          Button.__init__(self,*args,**kwargs)  #Some might advise you to use super here...

      def do_action(self):
          self.screen_flags['config'] = 0

#now use the cancel class
cancel=Cancel(c_button, (385, 301),screen_flags=screen_flags)

Of course, depending on what the shared data looks like (how many different variables you have, etc), you might want to pass a dictionary, or other object to make it so you don't need to pass 5000 different pieces of shared data around.

Another way of dealing with this is to define your "global" data in a class as "class variables" and then inherit from that class.

class GlobalData(object):
   stuff=None

class FooButton(Button,GlobalData):
   def do_action(self):
       print self.stuff
       #If you do something in here, don't do:  self.stuff = blah
       #instead, you *should* do: GlobalData.stuff = blah
       #However, it is fine to change mutable objects in place.
       #         e.g. self.stuff["dict_key"]=blah

#Now we can assign to GlobalData and instances of 
#FooButton will see the differences immediately.
cancel=FooButton(c_button, (385, 301))
cancel.do_action()
GlobalData.stuff="Cows say Moo"
cancel.do_action()

I hope this helps. There was a lot in you post, so sorting through it all was a little difficult.

EDIT

In case you don't understand how class variables are handled, see the comments in do_action. Basically, you need to be careful that you don't lose a handle on your data...

share|improve this answer
    
This is cool. Thanks! I really like the GlobalData Class idea. Seems like it'll be easy to keep track of everything. Thanks!! –  Zack May 10 '12 at 18:39
    
@Zack -- No problem. Glad to help. I've never used pygame, I'm a Tkinter guy myself. It's interesting to see some of the different ways of doing things. There is one downfall of the GlobalData class that i just thought of...I'll edit. –  mgilson May 10 '12 at 18:42

GUI stuff can be done nicer.

Yes, do wrap your control in classes.

I'd recommend to try this.

First, define logical interface for your controls. Forget about implementation details for a minute. Any control can be clicked; define method onClick(pos). Check boxes can be checked or unchecked; define setChecked(bool). Windows can be shown or hidden, define setVisible(bool), etc.

Create a common ancestor for clickable controls. Within its event handler, call onClick(event.pos). The default implementation would do nothing. Now you can call onClick() of a control when you want to imitate a click. You will want onMouseDown and onMouseUp to do things like click animation, onMouseIn and onMouseOut for hover events, etc. The only place where you'll care about the gory details of event dispatch will be your common ancestor.

Don't refer directly to global state; it leads to all sorts of unpleasant things. Instead, let every control know its state and how to change it (we're doing OOP anyway). So, the check box gets a isChecked() method, etc.

Now Cancel button would only have to override its onClick method and constructor. In constructor, pass the CheckBox instance; in cancel_button.onClick just call Button.onClick and then self.check_box.setChecked(False).

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