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I'm attempting to reduce the min and max of an array of values using Thrust and I seem to be stuck. Given an array of floats what I would like is to reduce their min and max values in one pass, but using thrust's reduce method I instead get the mother (or at least auntie) of all template compile errors.

My original code contains 5 lists of values spread over 2 float4 arrays that I want reduced, but I've boiled it down to this short example.

struct ReduceMinMax {
    __host__ __device__
    float2 operator()(float lhs, float rhs) {
        return make_float2(Min(lhs, rhs), Max(lhs, rhs));
    }
};

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){

    thrust::device_vector<float> hat(4);
    hat[0] = 3;
    hat[1] = 5;
    hat[2] = 6;
    hat[3] = 1;

    ReduceMinMax binary_op_of_dooooom;
    thrust::reduce(hat.begin(), hat.end(), 4.0f, binary_op_of_dooooom);
}

If I split it into 2 reductions instead it of course works. My question is then: Is it possible to reduce both the min and max in one pass with thrust and how? If not then what is the most efficient way of achieving said reduction? Will a transform iterator help me (and if so, will the reduction then be a one pass reduction?)

Some additional info: I'm using Thrust 1.5 (as supplied by CUDA 4.2.7) My actual code is using reduce_by_key, not just reduce. I found transform_reduce while writing this question, but that one doesn't take keys into account.

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3  
The binary operator function can't have a different return type from its argument type. Why are you using thrust::reduce for this anyway? Can't you use thrust::minmax_element ? –  talonmies May 10 '12 at 18:36
3  
@gpu: You really should disclose that you work at AccelerEyes whenever you do a plug for ArrayFire. –  Roger Dahl May 10 '12 at 20:43
2  
@gpu: Saying that ArrayFire is freely available is misleading as you don't know if the person asking the question needs to distribute across multiple GPUs or needs any of the other features that would cause them to fall outside the requirements for the free version. Then, the price is $2,500 per year per 2 GPUs. –  Roger Dahl May 10 '12 at 20:51
    
@RogerDahl Duly noted. For reductions on a single GPU, ArrayFire is ~13X faster than Thrust and can be coded in ~8X fewer lines of code. So, for papaboo, if you only need 1 GPU, you might consider that. Of course, I'm biased towards ArrayFire because I work on it. Many of the other commentors here work on Thrust and are biased as well. Benchmark yourself to make see :) –  arrayfire May 13 '12 at 22:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As talonmies notes, your reduction does not compile because thrust::reduce expects the binary operator's argument types to match its result type, but ReduceMinMax's argument type is float, while its result type is float2.

thrust::minmax_element implements this operation directly, but if necessary you could instead implement your reduction with thrust::inner_product, which generalizes thrust::reduce:

#include <thrust/inner_product.h>
#include <thrust/device_vector.h>
#include <thrust/extrema.h>
#include <cassert>

struct minmax_float
{
  __host__ __device__
  float2 operator()(float lhs, float rhs)
  {
    return make_float2(thrust::min(lhs, rhs), thrust::max(lhs, rhs));
  }
};

struct minmax_float2
{
  __host__ __device__
  float2 operator()(float2 lhs, float2 rhs)
  {
    return make_float2(thrust::min(lhs.x, rhs.x), thrust::max(lhs.y, rhs.y));
  }
};

float2 minmax1(const thrust::device_vector<float> &x)
{
  return thrust::inner_product(x.begin(), x.end(), x.begin(), make_float2(4.0, 4.0f), minmax_float2(), minmax_float());
}

float2 minmax2(const thrust::device_vector<float> &x)
{
  using namespace thrust;
  pair<device_vector<float>::const_iterator, device_vector<float>::const_iterator> ptr_to_result;

  ptr_to_result = minmax_element(x.begin(), x.end());

  return make_float2(*ptr_to_result.first, *ptr_to_result.second);
}

int main()
{
  thrust::device_vector<float> hat(4);
  hat[0] = 3;
  hat[1] = 5;
  hat[2] = 6;
  hat[3] = 1;

  float2 result1 = minmax1(hat);
  float2 result2 = minmax2(hat);

  assert(result1.x == result2.x);
  assert(result1.y == result2.y);
}
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