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How would you push each id value in an array from an array of hashes?

I have this array:

@friends = [ 
   {'id' => 1, 'last_name' => 'Fo', 'first_name' => 'fa' }, 
   {'id' => 3, 'last_name' => 'pa', 'first_name' => 'pi' }, 
   {'id' => 2, 'last_name' => 'ma', 'first_name' => 'mi' } 
];

I want to create an array of value id like this: @friend_ids = [1, 3, 2], using push.

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Probably with map - something like map { push @friend_ids, $$_{id} } @friends;. Can't test it now so I don't want to make an answer though. –  Rob I May 10 '12 at 19:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You probably have @friends = ( ... ) and want @friend_ids = (1, 3, 2). Square brackets are used for array references, not lists. You can create such an array like this:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my @friends = ( {id => 1, last_name => 'Fo', first_name => 'fa' },
                {id => 3, last_name => 'pa', first_name => 'pi' },
                {id => 2, last_name => 'ma', first_name => 'mi' } );
my @friend_ids;
push @friend_ids, $_->{id} for @friends;
print "@friend_ids\n";

But you can achieve the same without push more easily:

my @friend_ids = map $_->{id}, @friends;

If you need to remove duplicates, and sort the keys, you can use:

my @friend_ids = sort {$a <=> $b} uniq map $_->{id}, @friends;

if all IDs are numbers or just

my @friend_ids = sort uniq map $_->{id}, @friends;

if some IDs are not numeric (uniq is from List::MoreUtils).

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2  
The push method would be: «push @friend_ids, $_->{id} for @friends;» or «push map $_->{id}, @friend_ids;». No reason to use both map and for. –  ikegami May 10 '12 at 19:20
    
@ikegami: corrected, thank you. Retyping code from a command line... –  choroba May 10 '12 at 19:22
    
wow thanks y'all –  mamesaye May 10 '12 at 20:01
    
@choroba - my bad, it is an array references (Square brackets) not a list.how does that change the answer? –  mamesaye May 10 '12 at 20:31
2  
@mamesaye: if the reference is kept in a scalar, just use @$ref to dereference it. If you really use an array to keep the reference, the reference is kept in its zeroth member $array[0], so use @{ $array[0] } to dereference it. –  choroba May 10 '12 at 20:43

I would use a hash for that, so as to remove duplicates and make the result easily sortable (if needed):

my @friends = ( {id => 1, last_name => 'Fo', first_name => 'fa' },  
                {id => 3, last_name => 'pa', first_name => 'pi' },  
                {id => 2, last_name => 'ma', first_name => 'mi' } );  

my %id = map { $_->{id} => 1 } @friends;
my @friend_ids = sort { $a <=> $b } (keys %id); 
print "@friend_ids\n";

You can test this script on Ideone.

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Since the ids are numeric, you should use numeric sort. Also, note my %id = map { $_->{id} => 1 } @friends; –  Sinan Ünür May 10 '12 at 19:39
    
@SinanUnur - thanks for optimization... –  Ωmega May 10 '12 at 19:43
    
The question does not require sort, so using an intermediate hash is resource waste. –  dolmen May 11 '12 at 8:57

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