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I have a class that derives from a C struct. The class does not do anything special, other than initialization in the constructor, deinitialization function during the destructor, and a few other methods that call into C functions. Basically, it's a run-of-the-mill wrapper. Using GCC, it complained that my destructor was not virtual, so I made it that. Now I run into segfaults.

/* C header file */
struct A
{
  /* ... */
}

// My C++ code
class B : public A
{
public:
  B() { /* ... init ... */ }
  virtual ~B() { /* ... deinit ... */ }

  void do()
  {
    someCFunction(static_cast<A *>(this));
  }
};

I was always under the assumption that the static_cast would return the correct pointer to the base class, pruning off the virtual table pointer. So this may not be the case, since I get a segfault in the C function.

By removing the virtual keyword, the code works fine, except that I get a gcc warning. What is the best work around for this? Feel free to enlighten me :).

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1  
Can you make A::~A virtual? –  Captain Giraffe May 10 '12 at 19:18
    
No, I cannot. It's a public C header. –  MarkP May 10 '12 at 19:19
    
Why not use a class instead of a struct? The difference is obvious yet the same goal is achieved. –  Poni May 10 '12 at 19:20
1  
@MarkP: No, it doesn't. A B* will automatically, and safely, convert to an A*. The cast is redundant. –  Puppy May 10 '12 at 19:32
2  
One more thing: Any time you're trying to reason about the language C++ and how to use it correctly, and you find yourself thinking about a "vtable", you're probably Thinking About It Wrong. There's no "vtable" in the language. –  Kerrek SB May 10 '12 at 19:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Both the explicit and implicit conversion to A* are safe. There is neither need for an explicit cast, nor is it going to introduce vtables anywhere, or anything like that. The language would be fundamentally unusable if this were not the case.

I was always under the assumption that the static_cast would return the correct pointer to the base class, pruning off the virtual table pointer.

Is absolutely correct.

The destructor need be virtual only if delete ptr; is called where ptr has type A*- or the destructor invoked manually. And it would be A's destructor that would have to be virtual, which it isn't.

Whatever the problem is in your code, it has nothing to do with the code shown. You need to expand your sample considerably.

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1  
This is probably the only sensible answer in the light of the poorly presented and researched question. –  Kerrek SB May 10 '12 at 19:39

The destructor of base classes should be virtual. Otherwise, there's a chance that you run into undefined behavior. This is just a speculation, as the code is not enough to tell the actual reason.

Try making the destructor of A virtual and see if it crashes.

Note that a class and a struct are the same thing, other than default access level, so the fact that one's a class and the other a struct has nothing to do with it.

EDIT: If A is a C-struct, use composition instead of inheritance - i.e. have an A member inside of B instead of extending it. There's no point of deriving, since polymorphism is out of the question.

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I cannot, it's defined in a public C header. –  MarkP May 10 '12 at 19:19
    
@MarkP ok, see edited answer. –  Luchian Grigore May 10 '12 at 19:20
1  
Could you provide an explanation as to why inheriting from a C struct is not desired? I understand that when a virtual keyword is introduced, the virtual table is added. Does that also add a vtable to the struct? (as in, when doing a static_cast, does it return A with a vtable?) –  MarkP May 10 '12 at 19:23
1  
Why undef behavior if ~A is not virtual? At least if he uses A* to handle a B object, the memory occupied by B will not be deallocated when the object is destroyed. I cannot see the undefined behavior implication! (just real curiosity). –  Vincenzo Pii May 10 '12 at 19:38
1  
@puller it's undefined behavior if you call delete on an A*. That's why I said it's possible, not certain. –  Luchian Grigore May 10 '12 at 19:54

That's not how static_cast works. A pointer to an object continues to be the same pointer, just with a different type. In this case, you're converting a pointer to a derived type (B) into a pointer to the base type (A).

My guess is that casting the pointer does not actually change the pointer value, i.e., it's still pointing to the same memory address, even though it's been cast into an A* pointer type. Remember that struct and class are synonyms in C++.

As @Luchian stated, if you're mixing C and C++, it's better to keep the plain old C structs (and their pointers) as plain old C structs, and use type composition instead of inheritance. Otherwise you're mixing different pointer implementations under the covers. There is no guarantee that the internal arrangement of the C struct and the C++ class are the same.

UPDATE

You should surround the C struct declaration with an extern "C" specification, so that the C++ compiler knows that the struct is a pure C struct:

extern "C"
{
    struct A
    {
        ...
    };
}

Or:

extern "C"
{
#include "c_header.h"
}
share|improve this answer
    
So does inheriting from a C struct with a class that is virtual change the layout of the struct itself? –  MarkP May 10 '12 at 19:30
    
If nothing else, it adds a hidden vtable member. –  David R Tribble May 10 '12 at 19:34
    
@Loadmaster: no, the struct will not have a vtable. static_cast should return a pointer to the A, without the vtable. The static_cast should not be an issue. –  Mooing Duck May 10 '12 at 19:53
    
I'll try adding the extern statement around my include. Perhaps it will help. Otherwise, I'll end up encapsulating the struct instance instead of inheriting from it. –  MarkP May 10 '12 at 23:32

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