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The following [c#] code will not compile with the error "operator == cannot be applied to operands of type 'T' and 'T'".

public class Widget<T> where T: IComparable
{
    public T value;
    public Widget(T input) { value = input; }
    public bool Equals<T>(Widget<T> w) where T : System.IComparable
    {
        return (w.value == value);
    }
}

Is there a way to constrain the type T of the w input parameter to be the same type T as the object being compared thus guaranteeing they can be compared against each other and eliminating the compiler error? Using (dynamic) in front of value as below allows it to compile but it seemed like there would be a better way that would catch an issue at compile time:

public bool Equals<T>(Widget<T> w) where T : System.IComparable { return (w.value == (dynamic) value); }

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1  
What exactly do you want == to check? Reference equality? Value equality? –  Jon Skeet May 10 '12 at 19:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming you're really interested in value equality here, you can just use EqualityComparer.Default:

EqualityComparer<T> comparer = EqualityComparer<T>.Default;
return comparer.Equals(w.value, value);

Note that currently your Equals method is generic too, trying to declare another type parameter T. I don't think you really want to do that.

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Thanks. This took care of the issue. –  user1387916 May 10 '12 at 20:16

Is this what you want?

public class Widget<T> : IEquatable<Widget<T>>, IComparable<Widget<T>>
    where T : IEquatable<T>, IComparable<T>
{
    public T value;
    public Widget(T input) { value=input; }
    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if(obj is Widget<T>)
        {
            return Equals(obj as Widget<T>);
        }
        return false;
    }
    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return value.GetHashCode();
    }
    public bool Equals(Widget<T> other)
    {
        return value.Equals(other.value);
    }

    public int CompareTo(Widget<T> other)
    {
        return value.CompareTo(other.value);
    }
    public static bool operator==(Widget<T> a, Widget<T> b)
    {
        return a.Equals(b);
    }
    public static bool operator!=(Widget<T> a, Widget<T> b)
    {
        return !a.Equals(b);
    }
    public static bool operator<(Widget<T> a, Widget<T> b)
    {
        return a.CompareTo(b)==-1;
    }
    public static bool operator>(Widget<T> a, Widget<T> b)
    {
        return a.CompareTo(b)==1;
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Widget<int> a=new Widget<int>(100);
        Widget<int> b=new Widget<int>(200);

        if(a==b||a>b)
        {
        }
    }
}
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You'll need to null check value and w –  Servy May 10 '12 at 19:38
    
I do need to check for value, but not other or obj as Equals() and CompareTo() check for null also. –  ja72 May 10 '12 at 19:49
    
in the line return value.Equals(other.value); if other is null you'll get a null pointer error. other.value can be null, but if other is null your code blows up. The same issue applies to the same line in CompareTo. –  Servy May 10 '12 at 19:57
    
No it wont. Because the override will only hit if other is of type Widget<T> and not null. Otherwise it will go to the generic Equals(object other) where null is checked. Try it! –  ja72 May 10 '12 at 20:23
    
Widget<int> a = null; Widget<int> b=new Widget<int>(200); bool result = b.Equals(a); That will crash. Likewise a == b and b == a will also crash. Go run the program if you don't believe me. If the Equals(Widget<T>) method was private then you would be forced to go through the Equals(Object) method to do the null checking, as is, you are not. The compiler always chooses the type closest to the parameter when it has several options, so you would need to cast the Widget<T> to an object to get the object overload. –  Servy May 10 '12 at 20:34
public class Widget<T> where T: IComparable
{
    public T value;
    public Widget(T input) { value = input; }
    public bool Equals(Widget<T> other)
    {
        if(value == null)
        {
          return other == null || other.Value == null;
        }
        if(other == null) return false; //ensure next line doesn't get null pointer exception
        return value.CompareTo(other.Value) == 0;
    }
}

You may need to play around with the null checking logic based on how you want it to behave with various permutations of value, other, and other.value being null.

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That's assuming the comparison is consistent with equals - it may not always be. –  Jon Skeet May 10 '12 at 19:29
    
@JonSkeet Agreed. Considering the OP went to all the effort to ensure T is IComparable I assumed that the comparable implementation mattered more than the Equals implementation. –  Servy May 10 '12 at 19:30
public class Widget<T> where T: IEquatable<T>
{
    public T value;
    public Widget(T input) { value = input; }
    public bool Equals(Widget<T> w)
    {
        return (w.value.Equals(this.value));
    }
}

If you need equality comparison, then you should use IEquatable. IComparable is more appropriate for when you want order comparisons as well (less than, greater than).

I think that your main mistake is that you’re introducing a new type parameter in your Equals<T> method. Don’t; rather, let the T in your Widget<T> parameter be the same type that the class was instantiated with. This guarantees that w.Value would be of the same type as this.value.

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you need to null check w and w.value. –  Servy May 10 '12 at 19:59
    
@Servy: That wasn’t the point of the question. If we wanted to get pedantic, then the value field should be private, the Widget(T) constructor should throw ArgumentNullException if input is null, and the IEquatable<T>.Equals method implementation should return false if its parameter is null. So no, I don’t “need” to null check w or w.value. –  Douglas May 10 '12 at 20:08
    
Well you don't "need" to do anything. It would be best to null check those values. Not doing so has a reasonably high probability of causing exceptions that you are capable of preventing. If nothing else, it's a note to the OP that he should add null checking even if the answer doesn't. As for value being private, that would indeed be a better design, but not doing it won't cause the program to crash, which is also the case for not throwing an ArgumentNullException. (In fact, it may be perfectly acceptable for input to be null.) –  Servy May 10 '12 at 20:17
    
@Servy: It would make sense to null-check those values only if they are allowed, by design, to be null. If not, then you should use ArgumentNullException when introducing them, and refrain from littering your code with redundant null reference checks. You could argue that redundant null checks are still worth including just in case the class’s design changes in the future, but like I said, this whole argument is beyond the point of the original question. –  Douglas May 10 '12 at 20:54
    
It's not an error to compare null with a concrete value. The two are not equal. If two nulls are passed in then they are equal. There is no need to crash, throw ArgumentNullException, etc. There is a legitimate true/false answer for each case. –  Servy May 10 '12 at 21:58

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