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I've ran into some problems in an application where the .net process is running out of memory. One change I made in the application has been adding a lot of Linq to Sql classes. I'm wondering if there is an issue on how I'm creating my DataContext.

I could create my datacontext by creating the datacontext when I need it. Obviously if I was changing data, I would create a variable and hold the datacontext, because I would need the same data context in multiple statements.

Technique 1

public class SchoolRepository
{

    DataBaseDataContext GetCtx()
    {
        return new DataBaseDataContext();
    }

    public List<School> GetSchools()
    {
        return GetCtx().Schools.ToList();
    }
}

Here is another way I could create the DataContext. In this case I have a class field which holds a reference to a DataContext.

Technique 2:

    public class SchoolRepository
    {
        private DataBaseDataContext _ctx = null;
        DataBaseDataContext ctx
        {
            get { return _ctx = (_ctx ?? new DataBaseDataContext()); }
        }

        public List<School> GetSchools()
        {
            return ctx.Schools.ToList();
        }

    }

I have been using the second way (with a class variable), and I'm wondering if that could be causing the context to stick around longer than the first way--- because it would stick around as long as an instance of my class stuck around.

Perhaps I'm grasping at straws here-- but I'm wondering if one way is "safer" than the other way.

share|improve this question
    
One suggestion is to make sure that the connection being used by the datacontext is getting closed. I believe that the datacontext cannot be disposed until then. Check the remarks section on this page: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb292288(v=vs.110).aspx –  Dan Ling May 10 '12 at 21:23
    
Also, if have disabled deferred loading, that could be blowing up your memory if you have many related entities. –  Dan Ling May 10 '12 at 21:27
    
Thanks Dan, I'll check it out-- we're using LinqToSql, which frankly seems a bit more conservative when it comes to deferred loading than entity framework-- but I'm still investigating that. –  ek_ny May 11 '12 at 13:09

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