Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can I access my nestedMap in my iterator when the nestedMap is created in the put() method, like this:

@Override
public String put(final String row, final String column, final String value) {
    /**
     * Second map which is contained by centralMap, that contain Strings as
     * Keys and Values.
     */
    Map<String, String> nestedMap;

    if (centralMap.containsKey(row))
        nestedMap = centralMap.get(row);
    else
        nestedMap = new HashMap<String, String>();
    if (!nestedMap.containsKey(column))
        counter++;
    centralMap.put(row, nestedMap);
    return nestedMap.put(column, value);
}

and the centralMap is declared as an Object-Variable,

private final Map<String, Map<String, String>> centralMap;

but instantiated just in the constructor, like this:

centralMap = new HashMap<String, Map<String, String>>();

the method i'm trying to implement is the remove method:

@Override
    public void remove() {
        for (Map<String, String> map : centralMap.values()) {
            map = centralMap.get(keyName);
            iteratorNested.remove();
            if (map.size() <= 0)
                iteratorCentral.remove();
        }
    }

Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
    
    
Is it really a nested map? It looks like yet another method local variable to me. –  adarshr May 10 '12 at 20:13
1  
Access in which iterator? Show an example of what you mean please. –  Jim Garrison May 10 '12 at 20:15
    
if you had such a Map, centralMap<String,Map<String,String> and a nestedMap as described above, created just in the put method, how would you access it? you can do a for-each loop, like for(Map<String,String> map : centralMap.values()) map = ... but when i dont want to use a loop, must I change my method and make the nestedMap as an object-variable in my class or is there another way like centralMap.get(****), i don't know, any other solution to acces that nestedMap instanciated as above? Thanks! –  ZelelB May 10 '12 at 20:27

1 Answer 1

Not sure what you're asking exactly, but I think this is a little easier to read:

@Override
public String put(final String row, final String column, final String value) {
    /**
     * Second map which is contained by centralMap, that contain Strings as
     * Keys and Values.
     */
    Map<String, String> nestedMap = centralMap.get(row);
    if (nestedMap == null) {
      nestedMap = new HashMap<String, String>();
      centralMap.put(row,nestedMap);
    }

    if (!nestedMap.containsKey(column))
        counter++;
    centralMap.put(row, nestedMap);
    return nestedMap.put(column, value);
}

I can't quite understand what you're doing in the second stanza, so can't help you improve that. And I don't see an iterator as referred to in your question.

You're making me guess, but maybe ELSEWHERE in your program (it would really help to see more code, and a specific function prototype or statement of behavior you're seeking) you want to be able to iterate through the contents of the centralMap instance, and nested instances of nestedMap. Yes you can.

public void iterateOverAllNested()
{
   for (Map.Entry<String,Map<String,String>> nested : centralMap) {
     final String centralKey = nested.key();
     final Map<String,String> nestedMap = nested.value();
     System.out.println("Central map row/column: "+centralKey);
     for (Map.Entry<String,String> entry : nestedMap) {
       System.out.println(" key="+entry.key()+", value="+entry.value());
     }
   }
}

Note that this smells. Nested maps of untyped Strings are probably wrong. Any chance you've been writing Perl recently? I suggest you write a second SO question asking about a good data structure for your specific problem. You can include this code as your starting place, and folks will likely offer a cleaner solution.

share|improve this answer
    
From OP's earlier question: "We have a homework, to implement a class, that creates an Object that will be a 2Dimensional Map of Strings." –  Marko Topolnik May 10 '12 at 21:16
1  
@Marko: I guess I'll take my hat and go home. –  andersoj May 10 '12 at 21:40
    
this is the method im trying to implement: @Override public void remove() { for (Map<String, String> map : centralMap.values()) { map = centralMap.get(keyName); iteratorNested.remove(); if (map.size() <= 0) iteratorCentral.remove(); } } –  ZelelB May 10 '12 at 21:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.