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I'm trying to create a bit vector set from a given array. Not sure how to start it off. For example given the array: int rows[] = {1, 2, 5} I need to make a function unsigned short MakeBitVector(int values[], int nValues) You're allowed to assume that the range for the elements in the array is 1-9. Here's what I have so far:

unsigned short MakeBitVector(int values[], int nValues)
{
  (55)unsigned short int set = calloc(nValues, sizeof(unsigned short));
  for(int i = 0; i < nValues; i++){
    (57)set[i] = values[i];
  }
  return set;
}

I keep getting warnings and errors:

bits.c:55: warning: initialization makes integer from pointer without a cast

bits.c:57: error: subscripted value is neither array nor pointer

Any ideas on how to fix this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You definitely need your set to be a pointer:

unsigned short int* set = calloc(nValues, sizeof(unsigned short));

And you have to change the return type of the function to pointer as well.

Edit: if you want to pack everything into one int, you can go on in a simpler way:

unsigned short MakeBitVector(int values[], int nValues)
{
    unsigned short int set = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < nValues; i++)
        set |= 1 << values[i];
    return set;
}

You don't need to allocate a single int, returning the copy is just fine.

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1  
Dear silent downvoter, any courage to comment? –  Vlad May 10 '12 at 20:43
    
This works. but is there any way that I can allocate memory without having to change everything to a pointer.I don't want to have to change the return type to a pointer. –  user1386132 May 10 '12 at 20:47
    
@Vlad: That was me -- A bit-vector is a set of values represented by a binary string (eg {1,2,5} is represented as 11001}. There is no need for dynamic allocation to make one of these (if the array is known to only contain elements in the range 1-9), and this answer taken on its own will end up with the rest of the code indexing into the set by a short at a time, rather than by a bit at a time. –  Mankarse May 10 '12 at 20:48
    
@Mankarse: I cannot guess the semantics of values, it might be the copy of the bit vector as well. For the bit vector, I would not stay at just one int, as this restricts the set capacity to max of 64. So the bit vector's underlying structure has to be a kind of array. –  Vlad May 10 '12 at 20:50
    
@Vlad: From the question "You're allowed to assume that the range for the elements in the array is 1-9". So restricting the capacity is not a problem. –  Mankarse May 10 '12 at 20:52

I don't think you need dynamic allocation at all; calloc is just confusing things. Also, you will need to operate on single bits somewhere which your code isn't at present. What about this:

unsigned short MakeBitVector(int values[], int nValues) {
  unsigned short int set = 0;
  for(int i = 0; i < nValues; i++){
    set |= 1 << values[i];
  }
  return set;
}

Obviously the output of this is undefined if the input contains indices >= 16, but you said that shouldn't be a problem (and you could easily extend it to 32 anyway).

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set isn't a pointer. Change that to a pointer instead. You would also need to return a pointer as well.

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