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Suppose I want to parse the file

$ cat toParse.txt
1 2 3 4 5
1 "2 3" 4 5
1 2" 3 " 4 5 

The first two lines are easy to parse: Text::CSV can handle it. For instance, I tried:

use strict; 
use Text::CSV; 
while() { 
    chomp $_; 
    my $csv = Text::CSV->new({ sep_char => ' ', quote_char => '"' , binary => 1});
    $csv->parse($_); 
    my @fields = $csv->fields(); 
    my $badArg = $csv->error_input(); 
    print "fields[1] = $fields[1]\n"; 
    print "Bad argument: $badArg\n\n"; 
}

However, CSV gets very confused if the quote character is contained within the tokenized field.

The above program prints out:

fields[1] = 2
Bad argument:

fields[1] = 2 3
Bad argument:

fields[1] =
Bad argument: 1 2" 3 " 4 5

Does anyone have any suggestions? I'd like the final fields[1] to be populated with 2" 3 " ... in other words, I want to split the line on any whitespace that is not contained in a quoted string.

share|improve this question
    
I'd like to split each line on the space character " ", whenever the whitespace is not contained in a quoted string. –  asf107 May 10 '12 at 22:01
    
I think allow_loose_quotes => 1 will do it. –  ikegami May 11 '12 at 5:00
    
allow_loose_quotes => 1 definitely helps, but if there is a sep_char inside the loose quotes, the parser will still break. –  asf107 May 11 '12 at 13:00
    
The "I think" bit was because I didn't know what would happen in that circumstance. Ah well. As someone said, Text::CSV(_XS) is not the right tool anyway. And you have a very weird format on your hands. –  ikegami May 11 '12 at 17:17
    
yeah, I know its weird, but unfortunately I have to deal with stuff that looks like this all the time; data is not always smartly constructed :) I always use regex to handle it, but I guess I was hoping for a cleaner solution. –  asf107 May 14 '12 at 1:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you want is not CSV, so you need to code your own parsing.

This should work for your particular case:

use strict;

while (<DATA>) { 
    chomp $_;
    my @fields = /([^\s"]+|(?:[^\s"]*"[^"]*"[^\s"]*)+)(?:\s|$)/g;
    print "$_\n" for @fields;
    print "\n";
}

__DATA__

1 2 3 4 5
1 "2 3" 4 5
1 2" 3 " 4 5 
1 2" 3 "4 5 
1 2" 3 "4" 5" 6
1 2" 3 "4"" 5"" 6

...and its output is:

1
2
3
4
5

1
"2 3"
4
5

1
2" 3 "
4
5

1
2" 3 "4
5

1
2" 3 "4" 5"
6

1
2" 3 "4""
5""
6

Click here to test it.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. I've been using reg-ex to parse (bad) data that looks like this, and I guess I was wondering if there is a cleaner way to do it. –  asf107 May 11 '12 at 13:02

Change quote_char to something other that " and the third line would be

1
2"
3
"
4
5

However the second line will now be

1 
"2
3"
4
5

So you would appear to have one line where " is the quote delimiter and one where it isn't.

So the file you are parsing is broke, and you are going to have to get clever.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd like to use a " quote delimiter for all three lines, which would make my desired output looking like : fields[1] = 2, fields[1] = 2 3, and fields[1] = 2" 3 " respectively –  asf107 May 10 '12 at 22:04
    
Eh 2" 3 " isn't happening imagine if the field delimiter was a comma –  Tony Hopkinson May 10 '12 at 22:15
    
To illustrate the the difficulty you are causing the parser. With a quote delimiter of ' Then 1 '2 3' 4 and 1 '2" 3 "' 4 would work. –  Tony Hopkinson May 10 '12 at 22:32

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