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I have installed Ubuntu 12.04 and PG 9.1 with lc_collate, lc_ctype = es_PE.UTF-8 but it doesn´t collate as expected (u = ü = ú = U = Ú = Ü).

If I:

CREATE TABLE testing (id integer PRIMARY KEY, dad text, mum text, name text);
INSERT INTO testing VALUES
  (1, 'león','valencia', 'josé'),
  (2, 'leon', 'mendoza', 'juan'),
  (3, 'león', 'valárd', 'jose'),
  (4, 'león','válencia', 'jos'),
  (5, 'león', 'mendoza', 'jua'),
  (6, 'leon', 'valencia', 'josie'),
  (7, 'león', 'valencia', 'josie'),
  (8, 'leo','zara', 'juan'),
  (9, 'león','Valencia', 'jos');
SELECT * FROM testing ORDER BY dad, mum, name;

Then I obtain:

 id | dad  |   mum    | name
----+------+----------+-------
  8 | leo  | zara     | juan
  2 | leon | mendoza  | juan
  6 | leon | valencia | josie
  5 | león | mendoza  | jua
  3 | león | valárd   | jose
  1 | león | valencia | josé
  7 | león | valencia | josie
  9 | león | Valencia | jos
  4 | león | válencia | jos
(9 rows)

How do I have to configure it to obtain:

 id | dad  |   mum    | name
----+------+----------+-------
  8 | leo  | zara     | juan
  5 | león | mendoza  | jua
  2 | leon | mendoza  | juan
  3 | león | valárd   | jose
  9 | león | Valencia | jos
  4 | león | válencia | jos
  1 | león | valencia | josé
  7 | león | valencia | josie
  6 | leon | valencia | josie
(9 rows)

This is done in MySQL without any problem. But I can´t configure it in PG 9.1

Thanks in advance...

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Just to confirm, when you run SHOW lc_collate; and SHOW lc_ctype; in your database, both return es_PE.UTF-8? –  kgrittn May 10 '12 at 21:53
    
Yes @kgrittn even the cluster is created like that. Reading your answer the second form you proposed puts "leo" at the end which is not expected. I will investigate to test your first proposal but Make ú = u is not the purpose of collation? In this case it should use the second field then the third to order... as it is doing correctly by MySQL. –  TJC May 10 '12 at 23:20

1 Answer 1

PostgreSQL uses the operating system's collations; however, it never leaves the ordering of distinct values random -- if two strings are equal according to the collation, it essentially falls back on the C collation as a tie-breaker.

You have two possibilites: you can sort on strings which have been unaccented, or you can sort on a concatenation of the string columns.

For the first option, you need to install the unaccent feature in the database, like this:

CREATE EXTENSION unaccent;

That having been done, you could run this:

SELECT * FROM testing ORDER BY unaccent(dad), unaccent(mum), unaccent(name);

For the second option you wouldn't need to install anything else, but you could run something like this:

SELECT * FROM testing ORDER BY dad || ', ' || mum || ' ' || name;

In our shop we do something similar to this, but we use a "generated column" to ensure consistency. Something along these lines:

CREATE FUNCTION search_name(rec testing)
  RETURNS text
  LANGUAGE SQL
AS $$ SELECT $1.dad || ', ' || $1.mum || ' ' || $1.name; $$;

That allows a simpler selection like this:

SELECT * FROM testing t ORDER BY t.search_name;
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