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I have never done this before, and while I can't think of a specific reason that it would break, I'd like to verify that it is valid to use an out variable as follows:

void Main()
{
    var types = new [] { typeof(A), typeof(B) };
    bool b = false;
    var q = from type in types
            from property in type.GetProperties()
            let propertyName = GetName(property, out b)
            select new {
                TypeName = type.Name,
                PropertyName = propertyName,
                PropertyType = property.PropertyType.Name,
                IsNullable = b
            };
    q.Dump();
}

private string GetName(PropertyInfo property, out bool isNullable)
{
    string typeName;
    isNullable = false;
    var type = property.PropertyType;
    if (type.IsGenericType && type.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(Nullable<>))
    {
        isNullable = true;
        typeName = type.GetGenericArguments().First().Name;
    }
    else
    {
        typeName = property.Name;
    }
    return typeName;
}
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2  
This would be considered worst practice. –  asawyer May 10 '12 at 21:48
    
@asawyer, What, in particular, causes you to say that? –  sblom May 10 '12 at 21:49
    
@asawyer, as opposed to what? –  Aaron Anodide May 10 '12 at 21:50
    
I was typing a response but I see Reed covered it nicely. –  asawyer May 10 '12 at 21:50
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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This will work - provided you actually fully evaluate the query.

However, the behavior will be very odd, and would be something I would strongly avoid. Since the out parameter is being used directly within the query, the behavior will be fairly normal here (provided you don't do anything else with this), but that is specific to this use case, not a general "rule" with using out mixed with LINQ.

The problem is that LINQ's deferred execution will cause the out parameter to get set, but only when you use the resulting enumerable, not when you declare it. This can cause very unexpected behavior, and lead to difficult to maintain and understand software.

I would personally just write a separate method, and use it to allow your query to be written as:

var q = from type in types 
        from property in type.GetProperties() 
        let propertyName = GetName(property)
        let nullable = GetIsNullable(property)
        // ...

This is much more clear, and less prone to mistakes and errors. It will also work with parallelization (ie: PLINQ via .AsParallel()) and other techniques if somebody tries to change this later.

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3  
There's also a huge caveat around anything that could cause concurrent evaluation, such as Parallel, since the b is shared. –  Marc Gravell May 10 '12 at 21:51
    
@MarcGravell Definitely - I edited to show an alternative that won't have those problems for exactly that reason. –  Reed Copsey May 10 '12 at 21:54
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It's semantically legal to do this but whether or not it's safe is very dependent upon how you do it. The fundamental danger here is you are combing the assignment of a local with an expression that is delay, and possibly never, executed.

The call to GetName may actually never happen in this case if the collection is empty. Hence it may always maintain it's original value of false (this is also exactly why the C# compiler forces you to declare a default value here). If this semantic is OK with your program then the out use of b is perfectly fine. Indeed it appears to be in this scenario since b is only used after the method is called.

However this is something I would avoid in general. It's very easy to get this wrong in such a way that it would only fail in corner cases.

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This will work, just about, but for every wrong reason (and it is a bad habit to pick up, as it is not safe in the more general case). A safer idea would be a tuple:

        let info = GetInfo(property)
        select new {
            TypeName = type.Name,
            PropertyName = info.Item1,
            PropertyType = property.PropertyType.Name,
            IsNullable = info.Item2
        };

....

private Tuple<string,bool> GetInfo(PropertyInfo property)
{
    string typeName;
    bool isNullable = false;
    ...
    return Tuple.Create(typeName, isNullable);
}

For more complex scenarios, a type with sensibly named properties would be even better.

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Hi, I went with the voting majority for marking the answer but wanted tell you that I like your solution alot as it circumvents the issue that caused me to resort to an out var in the first place –  Aaron Anodide May 11 '12 at 21:01
    
@Aaron no problem; 2 options are better than 1 anyway :) –  Marc Gravell May 11 '12 at 21:18
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