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FYI, I am using Tmux through the Mac OS X Terminal app.

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This worked for me: notes.jerzygangi.com/… – Mike Feb 29 at 11:32
up vote 94 down vote accepted

This same question has been plaguing me for quite some time. Here's the best I've come up with. Put this into your .tmux.conf file:

bind -n C-k clear-history

This binds ctrl-k to the tmux clear-history command. The -n after bind makes it so you don't have to issue the tmux command prefix (ctrl-b by default). I use bash, so ctrl-l already does the equivalent of typing "clear" at the command line. With these two keys I get a nice ctrl-l, ctrl-k combo, which moves all the scroll buffer off the screen (the "clear") and then deletes all that history (the tmux "clear-history" command).

It's not quite as nice as Terminal's, iTerm's, or Konsole's 1-key combos for clearing it out, but it's a world better than typing in clear-history all the time.

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perfect, thanks. – Daya Sharma May 11 '12 at 21:56
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Nice. I've been doing bind k send-keys "clear"\; send-keys "Enter" for the clearing part, but using the built-in ctrl+l is simpler, and clear-history to get rid of the scrollback history is a good addition. – Henrik N Jul 15 '12 at 10:33
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this binding screws my panes up, removing all text from all panes and removes the borders around them! Any ideas on whats up with that? – Ian Vaughan May 13 '13 at 12:15
    
Yikes. What shell program do you use? Does it by chance already have some behavior defined for ctrl+k? – juanpaco May 13 '13 at 12:17
    
iTerm2. Just seen that ctrl+k already does this without the tmux binding set, so it must be an iTerm2 mapping. – Ian Vaughan May 13 '13 at 12:21

As @juanpaco correctly stated, clear-history is the command to clear the scrollback buffer.
I'll add that I like to also clear what's on the screen in the same command. Issuing a send-keys -R resets (clears) the screen, so I use the following in my .tmux.conf

bind-key b send-keys -R \; clear-history

This clears the screen AND the scrollback buffer.

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this doesn't quite work for me: my tmux doesn't know about any such "-R" option for send-keys... – gatoatigrado Oct 13 '12 at 0:18
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Directly from tmux documentation on send-keys: "The -R flag causes the terminal state to be reset." You probably just need to update. – z5h Oct 13 '12 at 15:59
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The drawback of using -R is that your current input-line becames hidden, differently from when you clear your terminal with Ctrl+l. What I did is bind -n C-l send-keys C-l \; clear-history – volpato Mar 26 '14 at 16:44
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For those of you who don't know (like I didn't), to arrive at the state to enter the clear-history command, press Ctrl+B, and then start the command with a colon (:). – palswim May 19 '14 at 23:11
    
@volpato I like your approach,but I find it still leaves one 'screen' of the buffer in the scroll back. No idea why. -R blanks out the prompt, but I 'resolved' it by adding an extra C-m at the end (but then that puts it on the second line). – Gdogg Feb 5 '15 at 20:02

I found using send-keys -R to be a little slow - here is another way to clear screen and history with a single command

bind-key C send-keys "clear && tmux clear-history" \; send-keys "Enter"  

A nested tmux call is used as the more obvious

bind-key C send-keys "clear" \; send-keys "Enter" \; clear-history

fails to clear the screen's current text from the history - the clear-history command appears to run in a separate thread to send-keys.

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there's one caveat with this approach and it's that it only works on local shells, because it sends the tmux clear-history as string to be written to the active pane. I've adapted it to: bind-key E send-keys "C-k" \; send-keys "C-u" \; send-keys "clear" \; send-keys "Enter" \; run-shell "sleep .3s; tmux clear-history" – Santi P. Oct 23 '13 at 19:09

If you want to combine CTRL-L plus clear-history, add this to your ~/.tmux.conf:

bind u send-keys C-l \; run-shell "sleep .3s" \; clear-history

This even works if you're in a MySQL shell for instance.

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This is what I wanted. – Bjorn Tipling Jun 3 '14 at 15:48
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This doesn't seem to work during, say, tail -f some.log, right? Is there a way to combine ctrl-Z with this? Can seem to get it right. – Aaron Gibralter Jun 22 '15 at 21:37

I've used some of the above plus other sources to come up with:

bind k send-keys C-u \; send-keys C-k \; send-keys " clear && tmux clear-history" \; send-keys "Enter" \; run-shell "sleep .3s" \; send-keys "Up" \; send-keys C-u 

The leading space in " clear && tmux clear-history" prevents the command from being written to the history file (providing you have your shell setup to treat leading spaces this way; google "hist ignore space" + the name of your shell for more info). I like to have this command not show up in my history since this is more inline with ctrl-k in the Terminal.

The first send-keys C-u and send-keys C-k will clear whatever is currently typed at the prompt to ensure that the " clear && tmux clear-history" is successful (e.g., if you've typed "ABCDEFG" at the prompt and have your cursor between the D and the E, this ensures that "ABCD clear && tmux clear-historyEFG" is not sent to the shell, which would fail).

The send-keys "Up" and last send-keys C-u clears out the last items from your shells internal history. Even with the trailing space mentioned above the internal history of the shell will include the " clear ..." line. Sending up and Ctrl-u gets rid of this.

Lastly, in iTerm I set ctrl-k to map to ctrl-a k (I have my tmux prefix set to ctrl-a), so I can type ctrl-k which is what my hands want to do from so many years of doing so. I do this, by going to iTerm > Preferences > Profiles > Keys and adding a shortcut to send the hex code "0x01 0x6B". There's a great article here which gives more info on using hex codes with tmux and iTerm: http://tangledhelix.com/blog/2012/04/28/iterm2-keymaps-for-tmux/

That pretty much gives me ctrl-k with tmux. The only thing that still kinda nags at me is that the real ctrl-k without tmux doesn't have problems if you currently have something typed at the prompt and will preserve what you've typed while clearing the screen. As mentioned, this approach needs to clear what's typed so the " clear ..." command doesn't fail. But it's pretty damn close!

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why not? bind -n C-l send-keys C-l

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I would like to know to me too if there's a reason to no recommend this. – Gaston Sanchez Aug 31 '15 at 22:10
    
First of all, that's not necessary: -n C-l basically says ‘catch this’, and then you're immediately passing that same thing through. (i.e. this is a no-op.) … Second, your intent is off, because ⌃L clears the screen, not the scroll back: if you hit ⌃B [ and then scroll up, you'll see that all of the scrollback is still recorded; the goal of this question is to clear that (tmux's) scrollback, not the visible terminal. – ELLIOTTCABLE Dec 8 '15 at 16:13

Way simpler than most, I just created a shell script called cls, and run it whenever I want to clear my screen and scrollback buffer.

All it is is this:

cls

clear;
tmux clear-history;
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So, I've been using plu's approach from above for a while, but I got fed-up with the limitations thereof (basically, the ⌃L passed through is meaningless unless piped to a program that understands it.)

So I've improved upon the various approaches in different answers to this thread; although complex, this approach works with both shells and other commands:

# ⌃K: Clears the current pane (from <http://stackoverflow.com/a/34162098>)
bind-key -n C-k \
   if-shell "test \"$(printf '#{pane_current_command}' | tail -c 2)\" = sh" \
      "send-keys C-l ; run-shell 'sleep .3s' ; clear-history" \
      "split-window -vp 100 ; clear-history -t ! ; kill-pane"

Try it with tail -f /private/var/log/system.log or something!


Caveats:

There's one important note here: this is invisibly resizing the pane being cleared, if it's not a shell. This can trigger resizing behaviour in some command-line applications listening for SIGWINCHes; but my reasoning is that this isn't a big problem, because those are programs you're very likely not going to be trying to ‘clear’ anyway.

In addition, the shell-quoting situation is already a mess, and can easily become more of one when embedding #{pane_current_command}, so be careful, you may have to modify this based on your default-command setting.

The same applies to my testing of the end of that command matching "sh"; if you have a default-command of something like /bin/bash --login or something complicated involving exec, the actual command may not end with "sh"; use ⌃B : to execute display-message '#{pane_current_command}' if you want to see what is being tested against.

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