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I have a file address.txt containing
`0x0003FFB0'
at line 1 and column 2
i want to paste it in another file 'linker.txt' at line 20 and column 58
How can i do that using bash scripting?
Note that the content of the input file can be random , doesn't have to be same each time.
But the length of the word to be copied will always be the same

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can use SED

sed -i.old '20s/^.{58}/&0x0003FFB0/' file

it will produce a file.old with the original content and file will be updated with this address. Quickly explain

sed '20command'    file  # do command in line 20
sed '20s/RE/&xxx/' file  # search for regular expression, replace by the original text (&) + xxx

to read the address and put in this sed, cut it possible

ADDRESS=$(head -1 address.txt | cut -f2)
sed -i.old "20s/^.{58}/&${ADDRESS}/" file 
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ADDRESS=$(head -1 address.txt | cut -f2) sed -i.old "20s/^.{58}/&${ADDRESS}/" file how will this code change if the input text be at line 2 and column 2 @Tiago Peczenyj –  Nikhilesh Sharma May 11 '12 at 3:19
    
this command is not working –  Nikhilesh Sharma May 11 '12 at 3:37
    
Perhaps you have a different version of sed. Try with sed -r and/or change the .{58} to .......................................................... literally. –  tripleee May 11 '12 at 4:13
    
sorry. use sed '20s/.\{58\}/ -- i forget this detail in sed –  Tiago Peczenyj May 11 '12 at 4:19

You can use a combination of head and tail to get any line number. To get line 2, get the last line (using tail) of the first two lines (using head):

ADDRESS=$(head -2 address.txt | tail -1 | cut -f2)

For the third line:

ADDRESS=$(head -3 address.txt | tail -1 | cut -f2)

And so on.

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