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So I have a function like this:

function music(song) {
var audio = new Audio("audio/" + song + ".ogg");
audio.play();
}

And the problem I'm having is that audio.play() works perfectly, but if I try audio.pause() later (after defining the same variable), it doesn't work. However, if I do this:

function music() {
var audio = document.getElementById("songname");
audio.play();
}

Then I can define the variable and later use audio.pause() to pause the track. The problem is that I want to do this within javascript because I have a lot of tracks and I don't want to create audio elements for each one.

Why doesn't the first piece of code allow me to pause the audio later? Is there any way I can let it pause the audio later? If not, are there any alternatives that involve playing the audio from javascript by passing a parameter which is the song title? I don't want to have to include the src in the html.

I suspect that jQuery might have an easy solution for this but form what I've researched I couldn't find anything.

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How are you pausing the track, can you show that? –  Starx May 11 '12 at 3:23
    
For example, I have an element; <audio id="song" src="audio"> and I use Javascript to play it like so: function play() { document.getElementById("song").play(); } and to pause: function pause() { document.getElementById("song").pause(); } Sorry the formatting is bad, for some reason my line breaks don't show up in the comment. –  Panini Raman May 11 '12 at 3:48
    
It should work like that then. –  Starx May 11 '12 at 14:56

2 Answers 2

audio only exists inside the function. if you need access to it outside the function then return the instance of the Audio object you are creating:

function getAudio(song, play) {
var audio = new Audio("audio/" + song + ".ogg");
  if(play) {
    audio.play();
  }

  return audio;
}

var theTrack = getAudio('my_song', true);
theTrack.pause(); // pause the song
theTrack.play();  // play the song

The second example refers to what i assume is an audio element which in turn exposes the functionality of the Audio object. The reason the second function works anywhere is because the DOM element is always present in the DOM and you are referencing that to get at the underlying Audio API, as opposed to a using the Audio object/API directly.

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Ah, I see. That's why the above example with setTimeout works. Thanks for your help, is there any way to give 'thanks' or 'kudos' here? –  Panini Raman May 11 '12 at 3:30
    
You can "vote up" an answer by clicking on the arrow above the question. If an answer effectively answers your question then select it as the answer by clicking the check mark. –  prodigitalson May 11 '12 at 12:01

I just tested a snippet and it works as such

function music(song) {

    var audio = new Audio("audio/" + song + ".ogg");
    audio.play();
    setTimeout(function() { audio.pause(); }, 5000);

}
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