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I am facing a problem to extract a particular numeric value from an input string.

Say, I had one string "this23 is 67 test 56 string 45", and i have to fetch number 67 from the string then how can i extract this using regular expresseion?

I only have to use regular expression.

Do you have any idea about it?

Thanks in advance,

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1  
What have you tried so far that isn't working? While we try to be very helpful here, we do expect you to put some effort into doing things yourself. When you try something that doesn't work, post the code here and explain how it's not working like you'd expected, and we'll try and help you figure out what's wrong. :) –  Ken White May 11 '12 at 3:23
    
+1 to your comment @KenWhite.. cheers! –  sha256 May 11 '12 at 3:30
    
@ken you are correct. i should be providing my findings first before looking for any help. i will keep this in mind from next time.. meantime i will look into the solutions provided and get back with the findings... –  nadeem khan May 11 '12 at 4:13
    
@KenWhite: That's the most polite "What have you tried?" comment I've seen in some time. ;) –  Li-aung Yip May 11 '12 at 6:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

[^\d]*[\d]+[^\d]+([\d]+)

The first chunk is 0 or more non-digits, followed by 1 or more digits, followed by 1 or more non-digits, followed by 1 or more digits. In parentheses so that you can capture it in whatever language you're using.

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Nice job in getting the original poster to show his own work first. You missed a good teaching experience by just providing the answer. :( –  Ken White May 11 '12 at 3:25
    
@happydave Thanks dave this worked.... –  nadeem khan May 11 '12 at 10:39
  • ignore any non-digit
  • ignore any digit (first number)
  • again ignore any non-digit
  • capture the second number

[\D]*[\d]+[\D]+([\d]+)

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try this:

^\D*\d+\D+(\d+)

I test this using Rubular -> the 67 is in the first group.

It is possible write a Regular expression with a look-behind command (?<=expression) but it is not possible to use * or + inside (at least in Ruby and Perl it is not possible).

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