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How to reverse regular expression in Java? For example, 'ab.+de' => 'ed.+ba'.

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Why do you need to do this? –  Ismail Badawi May 11 '12 at 3:58
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I need to do this to implement backwards search. –  Michael May 11 '12 at 9:08
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

wow.

You need to build a parser for regular expression and reverse all of the tokens/parts.

in this case

ab.+de is

a , b, .+ , d , e

and reverse this is

e, d, .+, b, a

now imagine groups

((ab)(.+de))

the reverse is

((ed.+)(ba))

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+1 Seems like a recursive function could be a good solution: Keep recursively reversing subgroups and then concatenating subgroups together (in reverse) on the way back up the stack. –  Paulpro May 11 '12 at 4:22
    
special regular expressions like (?<= expression) needs a special attention because it is a look behind. But in java... well... probably it is not work –  Tiago Peczenyj May 11 '12 at 4:55
    
Yeah, I would implement this just for real regular expressions for regular languages. Which is basically just concatenation (.abc), alternation .|a|b|c, and finite counting (.{2}a+b?c{,3}). –  Paulpro May 11 '12 at 5:34
    
how about backreference? –  Tiago Peczenyj May 11 '12 at 5:39
    
Nope, those aren't part of a real regular language either. Unless you can implement it just with the three rules concatenation, alternating, and finite counting (grouping can also be used in combination with any of those), it's not a real regular expression because it defines something more expressive than a regular language. –  Paulpro May 11 '12 at 5:42
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It would actually be much easier to reverse the haystack than the needle. And since Matcher takes a CharSequence instead of a String, you can do so with trivial overhead by simply wrapping the String (see the answers to Reverse a string in Java, in O(1)?).

With this knowledge, you can create an alternate version of Matcher that can appear to be reversing the pattern, but is really just reversing the input.

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