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Say you got a table view like this

seed_id     name           country
-------     ----------     -------

1           John           America
2           Jose           Mexico
3           Khan           Pakistan

and you'd like to paint the HMTL vertically as follows;

seed_id     1             2           3
name        John          Jose        Khan
country     America       Mexico      Pakistan

This kind of view comes very handy in two cases.

You want to print the table view or you want to compare fields side by side.

In print view, on a table with 50 fields, even printing a single record view does not get you a viewable print out. The paper will cut out the print proably at the 10th field or so.

but with a vertical view, it does not matter how many fields the table have.

Similarly, when you compare records side by side, like in this beautiful example

http://www.dpreview.com/products/compare/side-by-side?products=nikon_d90&products=nikon_d3&products=nikon_d4&sortDir=ascending

you get a very useful view.

I can sit down write this library function now but don't have the time at this moment. But I'm sure someone out there has either the time for it, or already has written it. Would you please share it please?

getview ($dbh,"select * from tableX where 1=1","vertical");

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3 Answers 3

You can use \G flag.

SELECT * FROM mytbl \G

UPD: sample article: http://slaptijack.com/software/enabling-vertical-g-output-in-the-mysql-client/

share|improve this answer
    
That's client-specific (it works in the mysql command line tool, but probably not in PHP?). –  eggyal May 11 '12 at 6:06
    
I'm not quite sure, it's better to try. –  deadrunk May 11 '12 at 6:07
    
This must be for a command line interface. Cause when I tried that in a mysql_query in PHP code, it comes back with a syntax error. –  Average Joe May 11 '12 at 6:30
    
I gave you +1 for the link. but I rather handle this programamtically rather than at the server level config changes. –  Average Joe May 11 '12 at 6:51
    
Thanks. Just tried this method using mysql php extension and got an error too. –  deadrunk May 11 '12 at 6:52

There's probably a better way that looping...

$table = array();
foreach($result_row as $row)
{
  foreach(array('seed_id','name','country') as $index)
  {
    $table[$index][] = $row[$index];
  }
}

Something like that should re-organise your array into the structure you'd need

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1  
See stackoverflow.com/a/3423692/623041 –  eggyal May 11 '12 at 6:04
    
Ha, that is quite funky! –  Scuzzy May 11 '12 at 6:07

eggyal I'm not answering my question. but this is the only way that I know at stackoverflow to repost a code as a follow up to my original question.

Anyway, I tried your link. ( that is Transposing multidimensional arrays in PHP ) But, it does not work for my case.

You can try it yourself and see. I attached two function needed to try this out. All you need is a mysql $dbh connection to give this function a go. You will see that in my function, I tapped into that flipdiagonally function that was up voted 24 times in that link.

When you call the function with the $direction_v_or_h being set to h, it works. but that's not news to us. It's the v mode I'm after.

Try it with limit like this

SQL_getview($dbh, "select * from yourTable limit 2","h"); 

and

SQL_getview($dbh, "select * from yourTable limit 2","v"); 

The error that I get is this; repeated for every single field in the table

Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in D:\Hosting\5291100\html\blueprint\sql.php on line 739



function SQL_getview($dbh,$sql,$direction_v_or_h = 'h')

{

    $result = $result = mysql_query($sql,$dbh);

    $fields_num = mysql_num_fields($result);

    if ($direction_v_or_h == "h"):
        echo "<table border='1'><tr>";
        // printing table headers
        for($i=0; $i<$fields_num; $i++)
        {
                $field = mysql_fetch_field($result);
                echo "<td>{$field->name}</td>";
        }
        echo "</tr>\n";
        while($row = mysql_fetch_row($result))
        {
                echo "<tr>";
                foreach($row as $cell)
                        echo "<td>$cell</td>";
                        echo "</tr>\n";
        }
        echo "</table>";
    else:
        if (1):    //turn this to 0 to see the good old print_r workaround
            echo "<table border='1'><tr>";
            // printing table headers
            for($i=0; $i<$fields_num; $i++)
            {
                    $field = mysql_fetch_field($result);
                    echo "<td>{$field->name}</td>";
            }
            echo "</tr>\n";
            while($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($result)) 
            {
                    echo "<tr>";
                        $row = flipDiagonally($row);                

                    foreach($row as $cell)
                            echo "<td>$cell</td>";
                            echo "</tr>\n";
            }
            echo "</table>";
        else:
            while($row = mysql_fetch_assoc($result)) 
            {
                    echo "<tr>";
                    echo "<pre>";
                    print_r ($row);
                    echo "</pre>";
                    echo "<hr>";
            }

        endif;
    endif;
    mysql_free_result($result); 
}


function flipDiagonally($arr) {
    $out = array();
    foreach ($arr as $key => $subarr) {
        foreach ($subarr as $subkey => $subvalue) {
                $out[$subkey][$key] = $subvalue;
        }
    }
    return $out;
}
share|improve this answer
    
FYI If you want to add a follow-up like this, you can edit your original question and include it there. Firstly, your flipDiagonally function isn't the code from the answer to which I linked (which uses array_map to transpose the array); secondly, you would need to call flipDiagonally on an array of the entire resultset, not on a single row (using the mysql_* library, I think you first need to build such an array by looping over the results; but if you use PDO instead - and you really should - then you can just use fetchAll) –  eggyal May 11 '12 at 7:22

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