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I wanted to see that a dynamically loaded library (loaded with dlopen etc.) really uses its own new an delete operators and not these ones defined in the calling program. So I wrote the following library.cpp

#include <exception>
#include <new>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio>
#include "base.hpp"
void* operator new(size_t size) {
	std::printf("New of library called\n");
	void *p=std::malloc(size); 
	if (p == 0) // did malloc succeed?
		throw std::bad_alloc(); // ANSI/ISO compliant behavior
	return p;
}
void operator delete(void* p) {
	std::printf("Delete of library called\n");
	std::free(p);
}
class Derived : public Base {
public:
	Derived() : Base(10) { }
};
extern "C" {
	Base* create() {
		return new Derived;
	}
	void destroy(Base* p) {
		delete p;
	}
}

and compiled it with

g++ -g -Wall -fPIC -shared library.cpp -o library.so

or as Employed Russian suggested to try (but in the end nothing changed)

g++ -g -Wall -fPIC -shared -Wl,-Bsymbolic library.cpp -o library.so

The class Base is only holding an int value and a function get_value() to get this value. After that I wrote client.cpp like this

#include <exception>
#include <new>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstdio>
#include <dlfcn.h>
#include "base.hpp"
void* operator new(size_t size) {
	std::printf("New of client called\n");
	void *p=std::malloc(size); 
	if (p == 0) // did malloc succeed?
		throw std::bad_alloc(); // ANSI/ISO compliant behavior
	return p;
}
void operator delete(void* p) {
	std::printf("Delete of client called\n");
	std::free(p);
}
typedef Base* create_module_t();
typedef void destroy_module_t(Base *);

int main() {
	void* handle = dlopen("./library.so", 
		RTLD_LAZY);
	if (handle == NULL) {
		std::cout << dlerror() << std::endl;
		return 1;
	}
	create_module_t* create_module = NULL;
	void* func = dlsym(handle, "create");
	if (func == NULL) {
		std::cout << dlerror() << std::endl;
		return 1;
	} else create_module = (create_module_t *)func;
	destroy_module_t* destroy_module = NULL;
	func = dlsym(handle, "destroy");
	if (func == NULL) {
		std::cout << dlerror() << std::endl;
		return 1;
	} else destroy_module = (destroy_module_t *)func;
	Base* a = create_module();
	std::cout << "Value: " << a->get_value() << std::endl;
	destroy_module(a);
	return 0;
}

and compiled it with

g++ -Wall -g -o client -ldl client.cpp

Executing client I only get a "New of client called" and a "Delete of client called". Even if I use the compiler switch -Bsymbolic for the library like Employed Russian suggested.

Now: What went wrong? I thought shared library are using their own new/delete and therefore you have to provide next to the factory create a destructor destroy in the library code.

Supplementary question: Why do I need the destroy(Base* p) function? If this function only calls the delete-operator of the client I could also do it by myself, i.e "delete a" instead of destroy_module(a) in the next to last line.

Answer I found: The library can also provide a new/delete-operator pair. So if I use first the library's new and later the client's delete I can probably step into a pitfall. Sadly until now I never saw my library using it's own new or delete... So the original question still isn't answered.

Supplement: I'm only referring to the Linux platform.

Edit: The important parts are in the comments to Employed Russian's Answer. So I'm giving the main clue in a nutshell: If one calls the gcc this way

g++ -Wall -g -fPIC -shared library.cpp -o library.so -Wl,-Bsymbolic

the library will use it's own new/delete operators. Otherwise results

g++ -Wall -g -fPIC -shared library.cpp -o library.so

in a library that's using the new/delete operators of the calling program. Thanks to Employed Russian!

share|improve this question
    
How did you "used it in my test program" ? Did you try LD_PRELOAD? –  J-16 SDiZ Jun 28 '09 at 10:51
    
I stated the "used it in my test program" a bit more precisely in my post. But I still don't know what you mean with LD_PRELOAD. –  phlipsy Jun 28 '09 at 11:27
    
Why is that sad? Doesn't this prove that is was using its own new and delete? That is what you were testing for wasn't it? –  0xC0DEFACE Jun 28 '09 at 13:22
    
I think you need to update your original question to avoid the confusion I see down below. Make it clear that the new/delete live in your .dll, and show the implementation of your "create" function (which I imaging just calls "new" on something). Also, what platform are you running on? If it's what I am suspecting, printf won't work. –  Jim Buck Jun 28 '09 at 16:57
    
Ok, I edited my question and added a few more information. I hope it's now more clear. –  phlipsy Jun 29 '09 at 8:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that on most UNIX platforms (unlike on Win32 and AIX) all symbol references by default bind to the first definition of the symbol visible to the runtime loader.

If you define 'operator new' in the main a.out, everything will bind to that definition (as Neil Butterworth's example shows), because a.out is the very first image runtime loader searches.

If you define it in a library which is loaded after libC.so (or libstdc++.so in case you are using GCC), then your definition will never be used. Since you are dlopen()ing your library after the program has started, libC is already loaded by that point, and your library is the very last one the runtime loader will search; so you lose.

On ELF platforms, you may be able to change the default behavior by using -Bsymbolic. From man ld on Linux:

 -Bsymbolic
   When creating a shared library, bind references to global symbols
   to the definition within the shared library, if any. Normally, it
   is possible for a program linked against a shared library to override
   the  definition within the shared library. This option is only meaningful
   on ELF platforms which support shared libraries.

Note that -Bsymbolic is a linker flag, not a compiler flag. If using g++, you must pass the flag to the linker like this:

  g++ -fPIC -shared library.cpp -o library.so -Wl,-Bsymbolic
share|improve this answer
    
But is this also the case if I explicitly overload the new/delete-operator in my library? I edited my original question so the problem is a bit more clear to see. –  phlipsy Jun 29 '09 at 15:42
1  
Yes, this is still the case. As far as runtime loader is concerned, you just defined two instances of a global function called _Znwj: one in the main executable, one in library.so. The first one runtime loader sees is the one it will use. As far is why -Bsymbolic didn't work; most likely you made a mistake: did you do 'g++ -g -Bsymbolic -Wall -fPIC -shared library.cpp -o library.so'? The '-Bsymbolic' is a linker switch, to pass it to the linker use '-Wl,-Bsymbolic'; otherwise it may be interpreted by GCC (which has a totally different meaning for -B... flags). –  Employed Russian Jun 30 '09 at 3:36
    
Ok, so I called "g++ -g -Wall -fPIC -shared -Wl,-Bsymbolic library.cpp -o library.so" and the client as I Wrote it in my question. But then again only the client's new/delete were called. I loaded the library dynamically, the client isn't linked to it at all. Is the linker switch "-Bsymbolic" also meant for this situation? –  phlipsy Jun 30 '09 at 6:37
    
You never revealed what your OS is. Here is what I see on Linux: $ g++ -g -Wall -fPIC -shared library.cpp -o library.so $ g++ -g client.cpp -ldl $ ./a.out New of client called Value: 10 Delete of client called $ g++ -g -Wall -fPIC -shared library.cpp -o library.so -Wl,-Bsymbolic $ ./a.out New of library called Value: 10 Delete of library called –  Employed Russian Jun 30 '09 at 16:45
    
That's it, now I see it too! And yes, I'm using Linux too. Thank you for your patience. –  phlipsy Jun 30 '09 at 17:17

The following code works as expected. Are you expecting your dynamic library code to use the new/delete you provide? I think you will be disappointed.

#include <memory>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstdlib>
using namespace std;;

void* operator new(size_t size) {
        std::printf("New...\n");
        void *p=std::malloc(size); 
        if (p == 0) // did malloc succeed?
                throw std::bad_alloc(); // ANSI/ISO compliant behavior
        return p;
}

void operator delete(void* p) {
        std::printf("Delete...\n");
        std::free(p);
}

int main() {
    int * p = new int(42);
    delete p;
}
share|improve this answer
    
No, I didn't provide a new new/delete in the "client" program for the library. I defined in my library file a new new/delete and wanted to see that the library uses its own, i.e. this new new/delete. –  phlipsy Jun 28 '09 at 11:08
    
@ph, how can you expect new to be called if you don't use it? i don't see this, i must have had a bad stand up this morning. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 28 '09 at 14:03
    
@litb: a thought the library uses it's own new/delete-operators than these ones defined in the client program. I defined in my library and in my client program different new new/delete-operators. But the only new/delete-operators called are these ones in the client program. Is this intended? –  phlipsy Jun 29 '09 at 15:39

Look into RTLD_DEEPBIND

share|improve this answer

I think the problem is that operator overloading in C++ is a compile-time, not link-time, feature. The DLL has been compiled without knowledge of overloaded new() so it won't work correctly.

Another possibility is that on your platform it would work used with linking (like in your example) but that the DLL does not resolve symbols from your executable file.

share|improve this answer
    
Probably I stated my question a bit unclear: I defined in my library a new new/delete-operator and was surprised that the library anyhow uses the new/delete-operator of the client. See also my edited question. –  phlipsy Jun 29 '09 at 15:49

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