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So ive been given an assignment in my university of "fixing" XPath and get it to return the nodes in the correct order.

Ive been trying to find a way around writing a very long code and breaking each expression into little peaces and putting it back together again.

Ive thought of a few ideas but i need help making them happen :)

  1. Find the method in the XPath jar that sorts the nodes and delete it - problem is i dont know if its possible to see the XPath jar code , and didnt find it online.- if you can point me to it , that would be great !

  2. Ive found this option which looks like it should do the trick http://cafeconleche.org/books/xmljava/chapters/ch16s06.html
    but it demands dom implementation of XPath 3.0 and i cant find that dom anywhere - any idea if there is such thing ?

  3. If you have any other idea i would love to hear !

For example : for this xml

 <library> 
 <book name="book1"> 
  hello 
 </book> 
 <book name="book2"> 
  world 
 </book>
 <book name="book3">
  !!! 
 </book>
 </library>

and this expression : /library/book[3]/preceding-sibling::book Im getting

book1 book2

insted of :

book2 book1

I can use anything as long as i do it in a java program

Thank you for all your help :)

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2  
Point taken , all changes made. :) –  Drau May 11 '12 at 7:31
    
What is the correct order? If you mean sorted, could you use XSLT? –  Greg Inozemtsev May 11 '12 at 7:36
    
Added an example . I can use anything as long as im writing it inside of a java code I didnt understand ,how the XSLT can help ? –  Drau May 11 '12 at 7:49
    
XSLT could produce a document with the nodes sorted in any order you wish. But as far as I can tell you just always want reverse order? –  Greg Inozemtsev May 11 '12 at 8:12
    
I need the order according to the expression Im evaluating, My input is a xml file- I dont know the structure of the file , i cant change that to XSLT. –  Drau May 11 '12 at 8:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In XPath 1.0, there are no node sequences, only node sets. The XPath 1.0 specification doesn't define the order of nodes in a node set. Many APIs don't define it either, but invariably they return the nodes in the node-set in document order - not because XPath requires it, but because XSLT requires it, and XSLT has set the expectations for how XPath engines should behave.

If you want node sequences with control over the ordering, you will have to move to XPath 2.0 (or XQuery 1.0, which is a superset of XPath 2.0). In XPath 2.0, the following expression returns what you want:

reverse(/library/book[3]/preceding-sibling::book)
share|improve this answer
    
Alright, and how can i move to XPath 2.0/XQuery 1.0 ? Where can i find the jar ? Looked for it already. will this also work on complex expressions ? or only knows how to reverse order of nodes ? (1,2,3,4,5 into 5,4,3,2,1) –  Drau May 11 '12 at 8:46
1  
@Drau: One possibility is to obtain Saxon -- whose sole developer is Michael Kay. And of course, get a good book on XPath 2.0 and start learning. –  Dimitre Novatchev May 11 '12 at 12:29
1  
There are several products that implement XQuery 1.0 or XPath 2.0 for Java, of which Saxon is one. Like Dimitre, I suggest you do some reading on the spec before asking any detailed questions; it's very powerful –  Michael Kay May 11 '12 at 14:56
1  
Sorry about that. If someone asks for help repairing a gas boiler, then before answering the question I will try and work out in my own mind whether they would be well advised to attempt the task. Of course, I don't have much to go on, so I might well get it wrong. –  Michael Kay May 13 '12 at 18:20
1  
@yedidyak: If you have a problem, then start a new question that explains the problem. –  Michael Kay Jun 6 '13 at 18:18

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