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I have a class of multiple 'DIV' elements and inside it are list of 'p' elements. See below:

<div class="container">
    <p>This is content 1</p>
    <p>This is content 2</p>
    <p>This is content 3</p>
</div>
<div class="container">
    <p>This is content 1</p>
    <p>This is content 2</p>
    <p>This is content 3</p>
</div>

Here's my jquery code on calling the 'p' elements through hover:

$('.container').children('p').hover(function(){
    //get the nth child of p from parent class 'container'
});

How can i get the nth child number of the element 'p' from its parent container class 'container'?

Like if you hover

This is content 1

it should trigger output as 1;

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Linked: stackoverflow.com/q/1442925/55209 –  Artem Koshelev May 11 '12 at 7:37
1  
@ArtemKoshelev that's the wrong way around - this question is 'given an element, tell me n', not 'given n, tell me the element'. –  Alnitak May 11 '12 at 7:38
    
@Alnitak oh, now I see, this pointed me to the wrong way “How can i get the nth child number of the element 'p' from its parent container class 'container'?” –  Artem Koshelev May 11 '12 at 7:41
    
oh. is it am sorry then..! –  Philemon philip Kunjumon May 11 '12 at 7:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 31 down vote accepted

You can use jQuery's index function for that. It tells you where the given element is relative to its siblings:

var index = $(this).index();

Live example | source

The indexes are 0-based, so if you're looking for a 1-based index (e.g., where the first one is 1 rather than 0), just add one to it:

var index = $(this).index() + 1;

If you're not using jQuery and came across this question and answer (the OP was using jQuery), this is also quite simple to do without it. nth-child only considers elements, so:

function findChildIndex(node) {
    var index = 1;                         // nth-child starts with 1 = first child
    // (You could argue that you should throw an exception here if the
    // `node` passed in is not an element [e.g., is a text node etc.]
    // or null.)
    while (node.previousSibling) {
        node = node.previousSibling;
        if (node && node.nodeType === 1) { // 1 = element
            ++index;
        }
    }
    return index;
}
share|improve this answer
    
you've forgotten to add 1 to the index... –  Alnitak May 11 '12 at 8:59
    
@Alnitak: Thanks, I suppose the OP did specifically say they wanted 1 for the first one, didn't they? Updated. –  T.J. Crowder May 11 '12 at 9:04
    
Would the recent downvoter please share some helpful feedback? Why did you feel this answer was "not useful" to use the downvote button's terminology? (Esp. as the OP clearly felt it was.) –  T.J. Crowder Jul 18 '12 at 16:10
    
have an upvote to make up :) –  Alnitak Jul 18 '12 at 17:33
1  
@Alnitak: LOL. I was just curious why. Seems so...random... :-) –  T.J. Crowder Jul 18 '12 at 17:57

Use the parameter-less version of the .index() method to find the position of the element relative to its siblings:

$('.container').children('p').hover(function() {
     var index = $(this).index() + 1;
});

Note that the result of .index() will be zero-based, not one-based, hence the + 1

share|improve this answer
$('.container').children('p').hover(function(){
    //get the nth child of p from parent class 'container'
    var n = 1;
    var child = $(this).parent().find("p:eq("+n+")");
});

Should work!

Or if you want to know the index of the hovered element:

$('.container').children('p').each(function(index,element) {
    // use closure to retain index
    $(element).hover(function(index){
        return function() { alert(index); }
    }(index);
}

See http://api.jquery.com/each/

share|improve this answer
4  
wow that's over complicated... –  Alnitak May 11 '12 at 7:38
    
Yes it probably is. I didn't know about .index(). It doesn't really make a difference in performance either: jsperf.com/index-vs-each. So I learned something today :-) –  Willem Mulder May 11 '12 at 12:03
    
it's not just performance, it's memory efficiency. Your version creates a new closure for every single matching element on the page. –  Alnitak May 11 '12 at 12:20
    
I know, but it might be efficient if you want to store the index somewhere and .index() did not exist. Another option would be to store the index on the element itself. But it doesn't really matter: my option is certainly not optimal :-) –  Willem Mulder May 11 '12 at 20:01

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