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Java allows the calculation of the (set theoretic) difference and the intersection of two Collection objects, via the removeAll() and retainAll() methods of the Collection interface.

The implementation of these 2 methods in the AbstractCollection class of Java 6 is

public boolean removeAll(Collection<?> c) { // Difference
boolean modified = false;
Iterator<?> e = iterator();
while (e.hasNext()) {
    if (c.contains(e.next())) {
    e.remove();
    modified = true;
    }
}
return modified;
}

public boolean retainAll(Collection<?> c) { // Intersection
boolean modified = false;
Iterator<E> e = iterator();
while (e.hasNext()) {
    if (!c.contains(e.next())) {
    e.remove();
    modified = true;
    }
}
return modified;
}

Is there any way of implementing or executing the above (obviously expensive) operations faster?

For example, would there be any overall performance gain from sorting a Collection before calculating the differences or the intersection?

Is there any class of the Collections framework preferable (performance-wise) for using these operations?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, there is a faster method possible. The code you supplied loops through c for every element of e. With two arrays of 100 elements, it would compare approximately 100,000 elements.

If you sort both arrays first, you only have to keep comparing the top two elements. This would do a couple hundred comparisons. This would be similar to merge sort. Do to do an intersection of the sorted collections left and right:

function intersect(left, right)
    var list result
    while length(left) > 0 and length(right) > 0
        if first(left) == first(right)
            append first(left) to result
            left = rest(left)
            right = rest(right)
        else if first(left) < first(right)
            left = rest(left)
        else
            right = rest(right)
    end while
    return result
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Hmmm... The implementation of the rest() method could be equally a bottleneck. –  PNS May 11 '12 at 7:51
1  
Yes, instead of making a new list every time with rest(), you could keep an index on both lists. Instead of calling rest() you would increment the index, and instead of comparing first() you would compare the elements at the indices. –  Sjoerd May 11 '12 at 7:57

These implementations are in AbstractCollection and therefore they are very generic since at this level of abstraction very little is know about the collections and the number of available operations is very limited. It's hard to anything much smarter given only what the Collection interface allows and not knowing anything about the kind of collection and its implementation details. Sorting may or may not be effective depending on size and type of collection in question, which at this level the code can't know.

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But if sorting costs, say, O(nlogn), shouldn't the overall performance always be faster than O(nn) if the 2 collections are "completely unsorted"? –  PNS May 11 '12 at 7:47
1  
It depends on the constant factors and N. The big-O notation represents the asymptotic case (very big N), in practice often constants play an important role, for some algorithms even for N into the thousands (like in the different matrix multiplication algorithms). –  Michał Kosmulski May 11 '12 at 9:40
1  
Plus there are memory costs. If sorting is to be O(n*log(n)), it needs a constant-time access container, like an array. Since you don't know what the collection is like, you would have to copy it into an array, meaning you double the memory usage (and quicksort if used takes yet another O(log(n)) memory by itself in most implementations). –  Michał Kosmulski May 11 '12 at 9:44
    
Sure. I am thinking of using an ArrayList for the union of all values from the maps, for fastest performance. –  PNS May 11 '12 at 13:39

Reading the javadoc of AbstractCollection:

To implement an unmodifiable collection, the programmer needs only to extend this class and provide implementations for the iterator[...]

So I believe that you should check how the Iterator is implemented for a specific class, to really understand the performance of those methods.

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Is there any way of implementing or executing the above (obviously expensive) operations faster?

How expensive these operations really are depends on how the collection passed as argument implements contains(). If it's a HashSet, contains is a constant (expected) time operation, causing removeAll or retainAll to complete in linear (expected) time.

Sorting would be more expensive that.

And well, it is reasonable that set operations are most efficient when done on a Set, isn't it?

If the elements in the collection are enums or dense integers, you can get more speed with an EnumSet or a BitSet.

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Quite right, especially about the constant time. The application scenario I need to use the above requires reading a large number of objects from different HashMaps, putting them all in the same collection, sorting them and then applying removeAll() or retainAll(). What would be the fastest way of doing all that? Is TreeSet the way to go? –  PNS May 14 '12 at 9:44

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