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As far as I can tell, there's no way to know that it's specifically a timeout that has occurred. Am I not looking in the right place, or am I missing something bigger?

string baseAddress = "http://localhost:8080/";
var client = new HttpClient() 
{ 
    BaseAddress = new Uri(baseAddress), 
    Timeout = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1) 
};
try
{
    var s = client.GetAsync("").Result;
}
catch(Exception e)
{
    Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
    Console.WriteLine(e.InnerException.Message);
}

This returns:

One or more errors occurred.

A task was canceled.

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3 Answers 3

You need to await the GetAsync method. It will then throw a TaskCanceledException if it has timed out. Additionally, GetStringAsync and GetStreamAsync internally handle timeout, so they will NEVER throw.

string baseAddress = "http://localhost:8080/";
var client = new HttpClient() 
{ 
    BaseAddress = new Uri(baseAddress), 
    Timeout = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(1) 
};
try
{
    var s = await client.GetAsync();
}
catch(Exception e)
{
    Console.WriteLine(e.Message);
    Console.WriteLine(e.InnerException.Message);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I tested this, and GetStreamAsync threw a TaskCanceledException for me. –  Sam Feb 18 '13 at 5:12
2  
How can I tell if TaskCanceledException is caused by HTTP timeout and not, say direct cancellation or other reason? –  UserControl Mar 26 at 5:51
1  
@UserControl check TaskCanceledException.CancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested. If false, you can be reasonably certain it was a timeout. –  Todd Menier Apr 28 at 22:29

From http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.net.http.httpclient.timeout.aspx

A Domain Name System (DNS) query may take up to 15 seconds to return or time out. If your request contains a host name that requires resolution and you set Timeout to a value less than 15 seconds, it may take 15 seconds or more before a WebException is thrown to indicate a timeout on your request.

You then get access to the Status property, see WebExceptionStatus

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2  
Hm, I'm getting back an AggregateException with a TaskCancelledException inside. I must be doing something wrong... –  Benjol May 11 '12 at 8:34
    
Are you using catch(WebException e)? –  Stijn May 11 '12 at 8:37
    
Nope, and if I try, the AggregateException is unhandled. If you create a VS console project, add a reference to System.Net.Http and drop the code into main, you can see for yourself (if you want to). –  Benjol May 11 '12 at 8:40
    
I won't have access to a VS11 machine for another 5 hours or so, sorry. –  Stijn May 11 '12 at 8:43
1  
If the wait period exceeds the task's timeout period, you'll get a TaskCanceledException. This seems to be thrown by the TPL's internal timeout handling, at a higher level than the HttpWebClient. There doesn't seem to be a good way to distinguish between a timeout cancellation and a user cancellation. The upshot of this is that you may not get a WebException within your AggregateException. –  JT. Nov 18 '12 at 22:21

I am reproducing the same issue and it's really annoying. I've found these useful:

HttpClient - dealing with aggregate exceptions

Bug in HttpClient.GetAsync should throw WebException, not TaskCanceledException

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