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I have a MySQL database with a table containing a BINARY(16) column.

When I write binary data via ODBC from my C++ application, the data is treated like a Null-terminated string, i.e. it is truncated at the first Null byte in the data.

In my C++ application I bind an unsigned char [16] array using SQLBindParameter like this:

SQLBindParameter(statementHandler, paramCount, SQL_PARAM_INPUT, SQL_C_BINARY, SQL_BINARY, MAX_NOTIFICATION_OUT_IP_BIN_LEN, 0, _notificationOutDstIP, MAX_NOTIFICATION_OUT_IP_BIN_LEN, 0);

MAX_NOTIFICATION_OUT_IP_BIN_LEN is 16.

How can I make sure that 16 bytes are written to the database, even if the binary data contains Null values?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From the MSDN documentation for SQLBindParameter:

If StrLen_or_IndPtr is a null pointer, the driver assumes that all input parameter values are non-NULL and that character and binary data is null-terminated.

Instead, set that argument to be a pointer to the data length:

SQLBindParameter(statementHandler,
                 paramCount,
                 SQL_PARAM_INPUT,
                 SQL_C_BINARY, SQL_BINARY,
                 MAX_NOTIFICATION_OUT_IP_BIN_LEN,
                 0,
                 _notificationOutDstIP,
                 MAX_NOTIFICATION_OUT_IP_BIN_LEN,
                 &MAX_NOTIFICATION_OUT_IP_BIN_LEN
);
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Obv, this assumes MAX_NOTIFICATION_OUT_IP_BIN_LEN is an int (const or otherwise); if it's a macro, you will first need to assign it to some variable which you reference. –  eggyal May 11 '12 at 9:30
    
Thanks a lot! Now it works :) –  Robert Hegner May 11 '12 at 12:59

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